Etymology
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equipment (n.)

1717, "things equipped;" 1748, "action of equipping;" from equip + -ment, or from French équipement. Superseding earlier equipage.

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equipage (n.)

1570s, from French équipage (15c.), from équiper "to fit out" (see equip). Now largely replaced by equipment. In 18c. often especially tweezers, a toothpick, earpick, nail-cleaner, etc., carried on the person in a small case.

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automated (adj.)

"done by automatic equipment," 1952, American English, adjective based on automation.

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attire (n.)

c. 1300, "equipment of a man-at-arms; apparel, dress, clothes," from attire (v.).

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pot-holder (n.)

also potholder, "something to cover and protect the hand when handling hot kitchen equipment," the cloth variety so called by 1902, from pot (n.1) + holder.

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parrel (n.)

late 15c., pariel, "rope or chain that fixes the middle of a yard to a mast," from parel "equipment" (c. 1400), earlier "apparel" (early 14c.), a shortening of apparel (n.).

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spotlight (n.)

1904, from spot (n.) + light (n.). Originally a theatrical equipment; figurative sense is attested from 1916. The verb is attested by 1923.

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harness (n.)

c. 1300, "personal fighting equipment, body armor," also "armor or trappings of a war-horse," from Old French harnois, a noun of broad meaning: "arms, equipment; harness; male genitalia; tackle; household equipment" (12c.), of uncertain origin, perhaps from Old Norse *hernest "provisions for an army," from herr "army" (see harry (v.)) + nest "provisions" (see nostalgia). Non-military sense of "fittings for a beast of burden" is from early 14c. German Harnisch "harness, armor" is the French word, borrowed into Middle High German. The Celtic words are believed to be also from French, as are Spanish arnes, Portuguese arnez, Italian arnese. Prive harness (late 14c.) was a Middle English term for "sex organs."

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batboy (n.)

also bat-boy, 1910, "youth who has charge of the bats and other equipment of a baseball team," from bat (n.1) + boy.

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tack (n.2)

"horse's harness, etc.," 1924, shortening of tackle (n.) in sense of "equipment." Tack in a non-equestrian sense as a shortening of tackle is recorded in dialect from 1777.

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