Etymology
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environment (n.)

c. 1600, "state of being environed" (see environ (v.) + -ment); sense of "the aggregate of the conditions in which a person or thing lives" is by 1827 (used by Carlyle to render German Umgebung); specialized ecology sense first recorded 1956.

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environmental (adj.)

1887, "environing, surrounding," from environment + -al (1). Ecological sense by 1967. Related: Environmentally (1884).

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maladjustment (n.)

"faulty adjustment, lack of adjustment," 1823, from mal- + adjustment. In a psychological sense, "unsuccessful adaptation to one's social environment," by 1899.

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surroundings (n.)

"environment," 1857, plural verbal noun from surround (v.).

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maladaptive (adj.)

"not exhibiting adequate or appropriate adjustment to a situation or environment," 1912, from mal- + adaptive.

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atmospheric (adj.)

1777, "pertaining to or existing in the atmosphere," from atmosphere + -ic. In a sense of "creating a mood or mental environment" it is from 1908. Atmospherics "disturbances in wireless communication" is from 1905.

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eco- 

word-forming element referring to the environment and man's relation to it, abstracted from ecology, ecological; attested from 1969.

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maladjusted (adj.)

"inadequately adjusted," 1846, from mal- + adjusted (see adjust). In modern use, especially "inadequately adapted to one's social environment" (by 1930).

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milieu (n.)

"surroundings, medium, environment," 1854, from French milieu, "middle, medium, mean," literally "middle place" (12c.), from mi "middle" (from Latin medius, from PIE root *medhyo- "middle") + lieu "place" (see lieu).

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cyberspace (n.)

"the online world of computer networks and especially the Internet, the environment in which communication over computer networks occurs," 1982, often written as two words at first, coined by science fiction writer William Gibson (best known for "Neuromancer") and used by him in a short story published in 1982, from cyber- + space (n.).

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