Etymology
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demonstration (n.)

late 14c., demonstracioun, "proof that something is true," by reasoning or logical deduction or practical experiment, from Old French demonstration (14c.) and directly from Latin demonstrationem (nominative demonstratio), noun of action from past-participle stem of demonstrare "to point out, indicate, demonstrate," figuratively, "to prove, establish," from de- "entirely" (see de-) + monstrare "to point out, reveal show," which is related to monstrum "divine omen, wonder" (source of monster). Both are derivatives of monere "to remind, bring to (one's) recollection, tell (of); admonish, advise, warn, instruct, teach," from PIE *moneie- "to make think of, remind," a suffixed (causative) form of the root *men- (1) "to think."

Sense of "exhibition and explanation of practical operations" is by 1807. Meaning "public show of feeling by a number of persons in support of some political or social cause," at first usually involving a mass meeting and a procession, is from 1839. Related: Demonstrational.

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demo (n.)

"music recording given out for promotional purposes," by 1958 in Billboard magazine headlines and advertisements, short for demonstration disk. The word was used earlier to mean "a public political demonstration" (1936).

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demonstrative (adj.)

late 14c., demonstratif, "characterized by logic, based on logic, showing or making manifest the truth or existence (of something)," from Old French démonstratif (14c.) and directly from Latin demonstrativus "pointing out, demonstrating," from demonstrat-, past-participle stem of demonstrare "to indicate, describe" (see demonstration).

The grammatical sense, "pointing out the thing referred to," is from mid-15c.; general sense of "having the quality of clearly showing, illustrative" is by 1520s. Meaning "given to or characterized by strong outward expressions of feelings" is from 1819. Related: Demonstratively; demonstrativeness.

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monstration (n.)

"a showing, a demonstration, proof," 1560s, from Latin monstrationem (nominative monstratio) "a showing," noun of action from past-participle stem of monstrare "to show" (see monster). Earlier was monstrance (early 14c., monstraunce).

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exemplification (n.)

mid-15c., exemplificacioun, "illustration or demonstration by example," from Anglo-French exemplificacion "attested copy or transcript of a document" (late 14c.) and directly from Medieval Latin exemplificationem (nominative exemplificatio), noun of action from past-participle stem of exemplificare "to illustrate" (see exemplify). Holinshed had a back-formation exemplificate.

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vindicate (v.)

1620s, "to avenge or revenge," from Latin vindicatus, past participle of vindicare "to stake a claim; to liberate; to act as avenger" (see vindication). Meaning "to clear from censure or doubt, by means of demonstration" is recorded from 1630s. Related: Vindicated, vindicating.

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probative (adj.)

"serving to test or prove; pertaining to proof or demonstration," mid-15c., probatiffe, from Old French probatif and directly from Latin probativus "belonging to proof," from probat-, past-participle stem of probare "show, prove, demonstrate" (see prove). Originally in terme probatiffe "a period of time assigned for the proving of an allegation."

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certification (n.)

early 15c., certificacioun, "notification;" mid-15c., "demonstration, proof," from Medieval Latin certificationem (nominative certificatio), noun of action from past-participle stem of Late Latin certificare "to make certain" (see certify). The meaning "act of providing with a legal certificate" is from 1881.

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persuade (v.)

"lead to the opinion or conclusion (that), make (one) believe or think, successfully urge the acceptance or practice of," 1510s, from French persuader (14c.), from Latin persuadere "to bring over by talking," (see persuasion). From 1530s as "prevail upon, as by demonstration, arguments, etc." Related: Persuaded; persuading.

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putt (v.)

1510s, Scottish, "to push, shove, butt" (a sense now obsolete), a special use and pronunciation of put (v.). Golfing sense of "strike the ball gently and carefully" is from 1743. Meaning "to throw" (a stone, as a demonstration of strength) in this spelling is from 1724; this also is the putt in shot-putting. Related: Putted; putting.

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