Etymology
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conventional (adj.)

late 15c., "of the nature of an agreement," from Late Latin conventionalis "pertaining to convention or agreement," from Latin conventionem (nominative conventio) "a meeting, assembly; agreement," noun of action from past-participle stem of convenire "unite, be suitable, agree, assemble," from assimilated form of com "with, together" (see con-) + venire "to come" (from PIE root *gwa- "to go, come").

Meaning "of the nature of a formal meeting of delegates" is from 1812, now rare; that of "established by social convention, arising out of custom or usage" is from 1761; sense of "following tradition" is from 1831. Of weapons, "non-nuclear," from 1955. Related: Conventionally.

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conventionalism (n.)

"mere adherence to convention," 1833, from conventional + -ism.

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conventionality (n.)

1834, "conventional thing or practice;" 1842, "conventional quality or state;" see conventional + -ity. Related: Conventionalities.

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unconventional (adj.)
1832, from un- (1) "not" + conventional (adj.). "A 19 cent. epithet for a certain type of affectation" [Weekley]. Related: Unconventionally.
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straight (adj.2)
"conventional," especially "heterosexual," 1941, a secondary sense evolved from straight (adj.1), probably suggested by straight and narrow path "course of conventional morality and law-abiding behavior," which is based on a misreading of Matthew vii.14 (where the gate is actually strait), and the other influence seems to be from strait-laced.
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rube (n.)

1896, reub, from shortened form of the men's proper name Reuben (q.v.), which is attested from 1804 as a conventional type of name for a country man.

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deschooling (n.)

"act or process of removing the function of education from conventional schools to non-institutional systems of learning," 1970, coined by Austrian-born U.S. anarchist philosopher Ivan Illich (1926-2002), from de- + schooling.

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beaux arts (n.)
"the fine arts," 1821, from French; also in reference to Ecole des Beaux-Arts, Paris, and the widely imitated conventional type of art and architecture advocated there.
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respectful (adj.)

1580s, "characterized by respect" (implied in respectfully), from respect (n.) + -ful. The meaning "full of outward civility" is attested by 1680s. Respectfully in conventional subscriptions of letters is attested by 1812. Related: Respectfulness.

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convenance (n.)

late 15c., "a covenant or agreement," from French convenance "convention, agreement, convenience," from convenant, present participle of convenir "to come together; join, fit, suit" (see convene). Meaning "conventional propriety" is from 1847.

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