Etymology
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carnal (adj.)

c. 1400, "physical, human, mortal," from Old French carnal and directly from Latin carnalis "fleshly, of the flesh," from carnis "of the flesh," genitive of caro "flesh, meat," probably originally "a piece of flesh" (from PIE root *sker- (1) "to cut").

The meaning "sensual, pertaining to the passions and appetites of the flesh" is from early 15c.; that of "worldly, sinful, not spiritual" is from mid-15c. Carnal knowledge "sexual intercourse" is attested from early 15c. and was in legal use by 1680s. Medieval Latin carnalis meant "natural, of the same blood," a sense sometimes found in Middle English carnal.

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abuse (v.)
Origin and meaning of abuse

early 15c., "to misuse, misapply" (power, money, etc.), from Old French abuser "deceive, abuse, misuse" (14c.), from Vulgar Latin *abusare, from Latin abusus "an abusing; a using up," past participle of abuti "use up, consume," also "to misuse, abuse, misapply, outrage," from ab "off, away from" (see ab-) + uti "use" (see use).

Also in reference to forbidden sexual situations from early 15c., but originally meaning incest, masturbation (self-abuse), homosexuality, prostitution, etc. From 1550s specifically as "to misuse sexually, ravish," but OED 2nd ed. marks this obsolete and the modern use "subject (someone) to unwanted sexual activity" is likely a fresh coinage from late 20c. Specifically of drugs, from 1968. Meaning "attack with harsh language, revile" is from c. 1600. Related: Abused; abusing.

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abuse (n.)
Origin and meaning of abuse
mid-15c., "improper practice," from Old French abus (14c.), from Latin abusus "a using up" (see abuse (v.)). From 1570s as "violation, defilement" (surviving in self-abuse "masturbation," if at all). In reference to drugs by 1961. Modern use in reference to unwanted sexual activity is from late 20c. Earlier in Middle English was abusion "wicked act or practice, shameful thing, violation of decency" (early 14c.), "an insult" (mid-14c.), from Old French abusion, from Latin abusio.
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self-abuse (n.)

c. 1600, "self-deception, abuse of one's own person or powers," from self- + abuse (n.). As a synonym for "masturbation," it is recorded from 1728; an earlier term was self-pollution (1620s).

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fleshly (adj.)
Old English flæsclic "corporeal, carnal;" see flesh (n.) + -ly (1).
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sensualist (n.)

"one given to indulgence of appetites, one who finds happiness in carnal pleasures," 1660s, from sensual + -ist. Related: Sensualistic.

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carnalize (v.)
"despiritualize, sensualize," 1680s, from carnal + -ize. Related: Carnalized; carnalizing.
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carnalite (n.)
"worldly minded man, one addicted to fleshly practices," 1570s, from carnal + -ite (1). Carnalist (1620s) also was used.
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carnally (adv.)
late 15c., "sexually, according to the flesh;" 1530s, "corporeally, not spiritually;" from carnal + -ly (2).
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carnality (n.)
early 15c., "sensuality, fleshly lusts or desires," from Late Latin carnalitas, from Latin carnalis "of the flesh" (see carnal). Meaning "state of being flesh, fleshliness" is from mid-15c.
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