Etymology
Advertisement
option (n.)

c. 1600, "action of choosing;" 1630s, "power or liberty of choosing," from French option (Old French opcion), from Latin optionem (nominative optio) "choice, free choice, liberty to choose," from optare "to desire, pray for, choose," which is of uncertain origin. De Vaan derives it from Proto-Italic *opeje- "to choose, grab," from PIE *hopeie- "to choose, grab," and compares Hittite epp/app- "to take, grab," Sanskrit apa, Avestan apa "has reached."

The meaning "thing that may be chosen" is attested from 1885. The commercial transaction sense of "privilege secured by payment of a premium (on a stock or a certain produce at a specified time and at a specified price)" is recorded from 1755 (the verb in this sense is attested by 1880 in American English). As a North American football play in which the back may either pass the ball or run with it, it is recorded by 1953.

Related entries & more 
Advertisement
call (v.)

mid-13c., "cry out; call for, summon, invoke; ask for, demand, order; give a name to, apply by way of designation," from Old Norse kalla "cry loudly, summon in a loud voice; name, call by name," from Proto-Germanic *kall- (source also of Middle Dutch kallen "speak, say, tell," Dutch kallen "to talk, chatter," Old High German kallon "speak loudly, call"), from PIE root *gal- "to call, shout." Related: Called; calling.

Old English cognate ceallian "to shout, utter in a loud voice" was rare, the usual word being clipian (source of Middle English clepe, yclept). Old English also had hropan hruofan, cognate of German rufen.

The "heads-or-tails" coin-toss sense is from 1801; the card-playing sense "demand that the hands be shown" is from 1670s; the specific poker sense of "match or raise a bet" is by 1889. The meaning "make a short stop or visit" (Middle English) was literally "stand at the door and call." The "attempt a telephone connection with" sense is from 1882.

To call for "demand, require" is from 1530s (earlier in this sense was call after, c. 1400). To call (something) back "revoke" is from 1550s. To call (something) off "cancel" is by 1888; earlier call off meant "summon away, divert" (1630s). To call (someone) names is from 1590s. To call out someone to fight (1823) corresponds to French provoquer. To call it a night "go to bed" is from 1919.

Related entries & more 
call (n.)

early 14c., "a loud cry, an outcry," also "a summons, an invitation," from call (v.). From 1580s as "a summons" (by bugle, drum, etc.) to military men to perform some duty; from 1680s as "the cry or note of a bird." The sense of "a short formal visit" is from 1862; the meaning "a communication by telephone" is from 1878. It is attested from 1670s as "requirement, duty, right," hence, colloquially, "occasion, cause."

Related entries & more 
roll-call (n.)

also roll call, rollcall, "act of calling over a list of names," 1775, probably from the verbal phrase (to call (over) the roll is attested by 1680s); see roll (n.1) "list of names used to determine who is present" (a sense attested from 1590s) + call (v.).

Related entries & more 
call-girl (n.)

"prostitute who makes appointments by phone," 1928, from call (n.) + girl.

Related entries & more 
Advertisement
optional (adj.)

"depending on preference," hence "that may be done or not done according to one's choice," 1765, from option + -al (1).

Related entries & more 
clepe (v.)

"to call; to name" (archaic), from Old English cleopian, clipian "to speak, call; summon, invoke; implore," which is of uncertain origin.

Related entries & more 
convocate (v.)

"to convoke, call or summon to meet," 1540s, from Latin convocatus, past participle of convocare "to call together," from assimilated form of com "with, together" (see con-) + vocare "to call," a verbal derivative of vox "voice" (from PIE root *wekw- "to speak").

Related entries & more 
provocate (v.)

"to provoke, call forth," early 15c., provocaten, rare then and obsolete now, from Latin provocatus, past participle of provocare "to call out" (see provoke). Related: Provocated; provocating.

Related entries & more 
appeal (n.)

c. 1300, "proceeding taken to reverse a decision by submitting it to the review of a higher authority," from Old French apel "call, appeal in court" (Modern French appel), back-formation from apeler "call upon" (see appeal (v.)). The meaning "a call to an authority" is from 1620s; that of "attractive power" attested by 1904.

Related entries & more