Etymology
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armed (adj.)
"equipped for battle," early 13c., past-participle adjective from arm (v.).
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gunny (n.2)
1940s, Armed Forces slang, short for gunnery sergeant.
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Wehrmacht (n.)

"the armed forces of Germany," 1935, from German Wehrmacht (name of the armed forces 1921-1945), from Wehr "defense" (from PIE root *wer- (4) "to cover") + Macht "might" (from PIE root *magh- "to be able, have power").

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skosh 
"a little bit," Korean War armed forces slang, from Japanese sukoshi "few, little, some."
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re-up (v.)

"re-enlist," by 1906, U.S. armed forces slang, from re- "back, again" + up (v.) "enlist." Related: Re-upped; re-upping.

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volunteerism (n.)
1844, with reference to armed forces; from volunteer + -ism. In reference to volunteer labor in community activities, by 1977.
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yardbird (n.)
"convict," 1956, from yard (n.1) + bird (n.1), from the notion of prison yards; earlier it meant "basic trainee" (World War II armed forces slang).
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combat (n.)

1560s, "a fight," originally especially "a fight between two armed persons" (later distinguished as single combat, 1620s), also in a general sense of "any struggle or fight between opposing forces," from French combat (see combat (v.)).

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gold-brick (n.)
"gold in the form of a brick," 1853, from gold (adj.) + brick (n.). Meaning "shirker" is from 1914, World War I armed forces slang, from earlier verb meaning "to swindle, cheat" (1902) from the old con game of selling spurious "gold" bricks (attested by 1881).
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goof (v.)
1922, "waste time;" 1941; "make a mistake," from goof (n.). Goof off is from 1941, originally World War II armed forces, "to make a mistake at drill;" by 1945 as "to loaf, waste time," also as a noun for one who does this. Related: Goofed; goofing.
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