Brazil has been in political turmoil for several years, and pictures of street protests there always show signs reading "fora _____!" There seems to be no good one-word translation of that in English: "down with" isn't quite right; "go out" is closer but not idiomatic; maybe the best approximation is the Southern imperative "git!" but it isn't typically used with a proper name.

Brazil has been in political turmoil for several years, and pictures of street protests there always show signs reading "fora _____!" There seems to be no good one-word translation of that in English: "down with" isn't quite right; "go out" is closer but not idiomatic; maybe the best approximation is the Southern imperative "git!" but it isn't typically used with a proper name.

Portuguese FORA seems to have not quite the broad range of senses in English GO, but to mean more "go out." What are fora's relatives in English? You expect it to come from Latin, and English gets most of its Latin from French.

But French changed the Latin -f- to an -h- (a habit more common in Spanish but occasional in French). So you get HORS in French. As in hors d'oeuvre (something "out of the ordinary" course of a meal) and hors de combat, literally "out of combat."

The Latin word is FORIS (adv.) "outside," literally "out of doors," from a prehistoric word meaning "door, doorway" (English DOOR, German Tür, also are in the family).

Medieval Latin had an adjective form of it, FORANEUS "on the outside, exterior," which passed into Old French as FORAIN, which in addition to "outer, external" also meant "strange." And this, about 1300, started being used in English in reference to places, "outside the boundaries of a country," and persons, "born in another country." It was spelled ferren, foran, foreyne at first, but eventually in the 17th century settled down as FOREIGN.

FOREST might also be another distant relative if its literal sense is "the outside woods," the trees "beyond the park," the park (Latin parcus) being the main or central fenced woodland, but that origin is lost in the mist and murk of the Merovingians.

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