luster (n.1)

"gloss, radiance, quality of shining by reflecting light," 1520s, from Middle French lustre "gloss, radiance" (14c.), common Romanic (cognates: Spanish and Portuguese lustre, Rumanian lustru, Italian lustro "splendor, brilliancy"), a noun ultimately from Latin lustrare "spread light over, brighten, illumine," which is related to lustrum "purification," from PIE *leuk-stro-, suffixed form of root *leuk- "light, brightness."

Especially "quality of glossiness or radiance in a textile material or fabric." Figurative meaning "radiant beauty" is from c. 1600; that of "splendor, renown" is from 1550s. Luster-ware is from 1825.

luster (n.2)

"one who feels intense longing desire," 1590s, agent noun from lust (v.).

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