poop (n.1)
"stern deck of a ship," c.1400, from Middle French poupe "stern of a ship" (14c.), from Old Provençal or Italian poppa, from Latin puppis "poop, stern," of uncertain origin. Poop deck attested by 1779.
poop (n.2)
"excrement," 1744, a children's euphemism, probably of imitative origin. The verb in this sense is from 1903. The same word in the sense "to break wind softly" is attested from 1721; earlier "to make a short blast on a horn" (late 14c.). Meaning "stupid or dull person" is from 1915. Pooper-scooper attested from 1970.
poop (n.3)
"up-to-date information," 1941, in poop sheet, U.S. Army slang, of unknown origin, perhaps from poop (n.2).
poop (v.)
"become tired," 1931, of unknown origin (see pooped). Related: Pooping.