pallor (n.) Look up pallor at Dictionary.com
c. 1400, from Old French palor "paleness, whiteness" (12c.) and directly from Latin pallor, from pallere "be pale, turn pale," related to pallus "dark-colored, dusky," from PIE root *pel- (2) "pale; gray" (source also of Sanskrit palitah "gray," panduh "whitish, pale;" Greek pelios "livid, dark," polios "gray;" Old English fealo "dull-colored, yellow, brown;" Welsh llwyd "gray").
[P]aleness in the Mediterranean is not so much the lack of color as a sickly, yellowish, sallow complexion, compered here to the hue of a gilded bronze statue. Sappho compared it to the color of dead grass. [Daniel H. Garrison, note on pallidor in poem 81 in "The Student's Catullus, 2nd ed., 1995]