outrage (n.)
c.1300, "evil deed, offense, crime; affront, indignity," from Old French outrage "harm, damage; insult; criminal behavior; presumption, insolence, overweening" (12c.), earlier oltrage (11c.), from Vulgar Latin *ultraticum "excess," from Latin ultra "beyond" (see ultra-). Etymologically, "the passing beyond reasonable bounds" in any sense; meaning narrowed in English toward violent excesses because of folk etymology from out + rage. Of injuries to feelings, principles, etc., from 1769.
outrage (v.)
c.1300, "to go to excess, act immoderately," from outrage (n.). From 1580s with meaning "do violence to." Related: Outraged; outraging.