orbit (n.) Look up orbit at Dictionary.com
late 14c., "the eye socket," from Old French orbite or directly from Medieval Latin orbita, transferred use of Latin orbita "wheel track, beaten path, rut, course, orbit" (see orb). Astronomical sense first recorded 1690s in English; it was in classical Latin, revived in Gerard of Cremona's translation of Avicenna.
orbit (v.) Look up orbit at Dictionary.com
1946, from orbit (n.). Related: Orbited; orbiting.