news (n.)
late 14c., "new things," plural of new (n.) "new thing," from new (adj.); after French nouvelles, used in Bible translations to render Medieval Latin nova (neuter plural) "news," literally "new things." Sometimes still regarded as plural, 17c.-19c. Meaning "tidings" is early 15c. Meaning "radio or television program presenting current events" is from 1923. Bad news "unpleasant person or situation" is from 1926. Expression no news, good news can be traced to 1640s. Expression news to me is from 1889.

The News in the Virginia city Newport News is said to derive from the name of one of its founders, William Newce.
news (v.)
"to tell as news," 1640s, from news (n.). Related: Newsed; newsing.