jump (v.) Look up jump at Dictionary.com
1520s, perhaps imitative (compare bump); another theory derives it from words in Gallo-Roman dialects of southwestern France (compare jumba "to rock, to balance, swing," yumpa "to rock"), picked up during English occupation in Hundred Years War. Superseded native leap, bound, and spring in most senses. Meaning "to attack" is from 1789; that of "to do the sex act with" is from 1630s. Related: Jumped; jumping. To jump to a conclusion is from 1704. Jumping-rope is from 1805. Jump in a lake "go away and stop being a pest" attested from 1912.
jump (n.) Look up jump at Dictionary.com
1550s, "act of jumping," from jump (v.). Meaning "jazz music with a strong beat" first recorded 1937, in Count Basie's "One O'Clock Jump." Jump suit "one-piece coverall modeled on those worn by paratroopers and skydivers" is from 1948.