juice (n.)
c.1300, "liquid extract obtained by boiling herbs," from Old French jus "juice, sap, liquid" (13c.), from Latin ius "broth, sauce, juice," from PIE root *yeue- "to blend, mix food" (cognates: Sanskrit yus- "broth," Greek zyme "a leaven," Old Church Slavonic jucha "broth, soup," Lithuanian juse "fish soup"). Meaning "liquor" is from 1828; that of "electricity" is first recorded 1896.
juice (v.)
1630s, "to suffuse with juice," from juice (n.). Meaning "to enliven" attested by 1964; juiced "drunk" attested by 1946; in reference to steroids, by 2003. Related: Juiced; juicing.