hawk (n.) Look up hawk at Dictionary.com
c.1300, hauk, earlier havek (c.1200), from Old English hafoc (W. Saxon), heafuc (Mercian), heafoc, from Proto-Germanic *habukaz (cognates: Old Norse haukr, Old Saxon habuc, Middle Dutch havik, Old High German habuh, German Habicht "hawk"), from a root meaning "to seize," from PIE *kap- "to grasp" (cognates: Russian kobec "a kind of falcon;" see capable). Transferred sense of "militarist" attested from 1962.
hawk (v.1) Look up hawk at Dictionary.com
"to sell in the open, peddle," late 15c., back-formation from hawker "itinerant vendor" (c.1400), from Middle Low German höken "to peddle, carry on the back, squat," from Proto-Germanic *huk-. Related: Hawked; hawking. Despite the etymological connection with stooping under a burden on one's back, a hawker is technically distinguished from a peddler by use of a horse and cart or a van.
hawk (v.2) Look up hawk at Dictionary.com
"to hunt with a hawk," mid-14c., from hawk (n.).
hawk (v.3) Look up hawk at Dictionary.com
"to clear one's throat," 1580s, imitative.