glory (n.) Look up glory at Dictionary.com
c.1200, gloire "the splendor of God or Christ; praise offered to God, worship," from Old French glorie (11c., Modern French gloire), from Latin gloria "fame, renown, great praise or honor," of uncertain origin.

Greek doxa "expectation" (Homer), later "opinion, fame," and ultimately "glory," was used in Biblical writing to translate a Hebrew word which had a sense of "brightness, splendor, magnificence, majesty," and this subsequently was translated as Latin gloria, which has colored that word's meaning in most European tongues. Wuldor was an Old English word used in this sense. Sense of "magnificence" is c.1300 in English. Meaning "worldly honor, fame, renown" of "the kingdom of Heaven," and of "one who is a source of glory" are from mid-14c. Latin also had gloriola "a little fame." Glory days was in use by 1970.
glory (v.) Look up glory at Dictionary.com
mid-14c., "rejoice," from Old French gloriier and directly from Latin gloriari "to boast, vaunt, brag, pride oneself," from gloria (see glory). Related: Gloried; glorying.