earth (n.) Look up earth at Dictionary.com
Old English eorþe "ground, soil, dirt, dry land; country, district," also used (along with middangeard) for "the (material) world, the abode of man" (as opposed to the heavens or the underworld), from Proto-Germanic *ertho (cognates: Old Frisian erthe "earth," Old Saxon ertha, Old Norse jörð, Middle Dutch eerde, Dutch aarde, Old High German erda, German Erde, Gothic airþa), from extended form of PIE root *er- (2) "earth, ground" (cognates: Middle Irish -ert "earth"). The earth considered as a planet was so called from c.1400. Use in old chemistry is from 1728. Earth-mover "large digging machine" is from 1940.
earth (v.) Look up earth at Dictionary.com
"to commit (a corpse) to earth," late 14c., from earth (n.). Related: Earthed; earthing.