antipathy (n.) Look up antipathy at Dictionary.com
c. 1600, "natural aversion, hostile feeling toward," from Latin antipathia, from Greek antipatheia, abstract noun from antipathes "opposed in feeling, having opposite feeling; in return for suffering;" also "felt mutually," from anti "opposite, against" (see anti-) + pathein "to suffer, feel" (see pathos).
An abuse has crept in upon the employment of the word Antipathy. ... Strictly it does not mean hate,--not the feelings of one man set against the person of another,--but that, in two natures, there is an opposition of feeling. With respect to the same object they feel oppositely. ["Janus, or The Edinburgh Literary Almanack," 1826]