unrecognizable (adj.) Look up unrecognizable at Dictionary.com
1817, from un- (1) "not" + recognizable (see recognize (v.)). Related: Unrecognizably.
unreconciled (adj.) Look up unreconciled at Dictionary.com
mid-15c., from un- (1) "not" + past participle of reconcile (v.).
unreconstructed (adj.) Look up unreconstructed at Dictionary.com
1867, "not reconciled to the outcome of the American Civil War," from un- (1) "not" + past participle of reconstruct (v.). See Reconstruction.
unredeemed (adj.) Look up unredeemed at Dictionary.com
1540s, "unsaved;" 1805, "not balanced by any good quality," from un- (1) "not" + past participle of redeem (v.).
unredorded (adj.) Look up unredorded at Dictionary.com
1580s, from un- (1) "not" + past participle of record (v.).
unrefined (adj.) Look up unrefined at Dictionary.com
1590s, "not refined in manners," from un- (1) "not" + past participle of refine (v.). Meaning "not free from gross matter" is recorded from 1610s.
unreformed (adj.) Look up unreformed at Dictionary.com
1520s, from un- (1) "not" + past participle of reform (v.).
unregenerate (adj.) Look up unregenerate at Dictionary.com
1610s, from un- (1) "not" + regenerate (adj.).
unrelated (adj.) Look up unrelated at Dictionary.com
1660s, "not akin," from un- (1) "not" + past participle of relate (v.). Meaning "not in any relationship" is attested from 1660s; that of "not told" is from 1764.
unrelenting (adj.) Look up unrelenting at Dictionary.com
1580s, from un- (1) "not" + present participle of relent (v.). Related: Unrelentingly.
unreliable (adj.) Look up unreliable at Dictionary.com
1835 (Fanny Kemble), from un- (1) "not" + reliable (adj.).
unrelieved (adj.) Look up unrelieved at Dictionary.com
"monotonous, unvarying," 1764, from un- (1) "not" + past participle of relieve (v.).
unremarkable (adj.) Look up unremarkable at Dictionary.com
1610s, from un- (1) "not" + remarkable (adj.). Related: Unremarkably.
unremitted (adj.) Look up unremitted at Dictionary.com
1640s, from un- (1) "not" + past participle of remit (v.).
unremitting (adj.) Look up unremitting at Dictionary.com
1728, from un- (1) "not" + present participle of remit (v.). Related: Unremittingly.
unrepairable (adj.) Look up unrepairable at Dictionary.com
1610s, from un- (1) "not" + repairable (adj.). Related: Unrepairably.
unrepentant (adj.) Look up unrepentant at Dictionary.com
late 14c., from un- (1) "not" + repentant (adj.).
unrequited (adj.) Look up unrequited at Dictionary.com
1540s, from un- (1) "not" + past participle of requite (v.). The earliest reference is to love.
unreserved (adj.) Look up unreserved at Dictionary.com
1530s, "not restricted or withheld," from un- (1) "not" + past participle of reserve (v.). From 1713 as "open, frank." Related: Unreservedly.
unresisting (adj.) Look up unresisting at Dictionary.com
1620s, from un- (1) "not" + present participle of resist (v.).
unresolved (adj.) Look up unresolved at Dictionary.com
1570s, "undecided" (of questions), from un- (1) "not" + past participle of resolve (v.). Meaning "uncertain in opinion" is attested from 1590s.
unresponsive (adj.) Look up unresponsive at Dictionary.com
1660s, "unable to reply," from un- (1) "not" + responsive (adj.). Meaning "not responding" is from 1775. Related: Unresponsiveness.
unrest (n.) Look up unrest at Dictionary.com
mid-14c., from un- (1) "not" + rest (n.). Similar formation in West Frisian onrest, Middle Low German unreste, German unrast, Middle Dutch onruste.
unrestrained (adj.) Look up unrestrained at Dictionary.com
1580s, from un- (1) "not" + past participle of restrain (v.). Related: Unrestrainedly.
unrestricted (adj.) Look up unrestricted at Dictionary.com
1766, from un- (1) "not" + restricted.
unrewarded (adj.) Look up unrewarded at Dictionary.com
early 15c., from un- (1) "not" + past participle of reward (v.).
unrighteous (adj.) Look up unrighteous at Dictionary.com
1520s; see un- (1) "not" + righteous (adj.). In Middle English, the word was unrightwis, from Old English unrihtwis. Related: Unrighteously; unrighteousness.
unripe (adj.) Look up unripe at Dictionary.com
Old English unripe "premature" (in reference to death), from un- (1) "not" + ripe (adj.). Meaning "immature, not fully developed (of fruit, etc.) is recorded from mid-13c. Similar formation in Middle Dutch onrijp, Old High German unrifi, German unreif.
unrivalled (adj.) Look up unrivalled at Dictionary.com
also unrivaled, 1590s, from un- (1) "not" + past participle of rival (v.).
unroll (v.) Look up unroll at Dictionary.com
early 15c. (transitive), from un- (2) + roll (v.). Intransitive sense from 1580s. Related: Unrolled; unrolling.
unromantic (adj.) Look up unromantic at Dictionary.com
1731, from un- (1) "not" + romantic (adj.).
unruffled (adj.) Look up unruffled at Dictionary.com
1650s in figurative sense, from un- (1) "not" + past participle of ruffle (v.). Literal meaning, in reference to feathers, leaves, etc., is recorded from 1816.
unruly (adj.) Look up unruly at Dictionary.com
"disposed to resist lawful restraint," c.1400, from un- (1) "not" + obsolete ruly (adj.) "amenable to rule." Related: Unruliness.
unsafe (adj.) Look up unsafe at Dictionary.com
1590s, "involving risk or danger," from un- (1) "not" + safe (adj.).
unsaid (adj.) Look up unsaid at Dictionary.com
Old English unsæd, from un- (1) "not" + past participle of say (v.). Similar formation in Middle Dutch ongeseit, German ungesagt, Old Norse usagðr.
unsalted (adj.) Look up unsalted at Dictionary.com
mid-15c., from un- (1) "not" + past participle of salt (v.). Similar formation in North Frisian unsalted, Swedish osaltad, Danish usaltet.
unsanitary (adj.) Look up unsanitary at Dictionary.com
1871, from un- (1) "not" + sanitary (adj.).
unsatiable (adj.) Look up unsatiable at Dictionary.com
late 14c., from un- (1) "not" + satiable (adj.). Since 17c. the usual form is insatiable.
unsatisfactory (adj.) Look up unsatisfactory at Dictionary.com
1640s, from un- (1) "not" + satisfactory (adj.). Related: Unsatisfactorily; unsatisfactoriness.
unsatisfied (adj.) Look up unsatisfied at Dictionary.com
early 15c., from un- (1) "not" + satisfied (adj.).
unsaturated (adj.) Look up unsaturated at Dictionary.com
1756, from un- (1) "not" + past participle of saturate (v.).
unsavory (adj.) Look up unsavory at Dictionary.com
also unsavoury, early 13c., "tasteless, insipid," from un- (1) "not" + savory (adj.). Meaning "unpleasant or disagreeable to the taste" is attested from late 14c.; of persons, from c.1400. Related: Unsavoriness.
unscathed (adj.) Look up unscathed at Dictionary.com
late 14c., from un- (1) "not" + past participle of scathe (v.). Mainly in Scottish before 19c. Similar formation in Old Norse ostaðaðr, Swedish oskadad.
unschooled (adj.) Look up unschooled at Dictionary.com
1580s, "untrained," from un- (1) "not" + past participle of school (v.). A verb unschool is attested from 1820.
unscramble (v.) Look up unscramble at Dictionary.com
"restore to order," 1911, from un- (2) "reverse, opposite of" + scramble (v.). The original use is in a quip attributed to U.S. financier J.P. Morgan (1837-1913) about the impossibility of unscrambling an omelet.
Mr. Morgan is credited with the aphorism that the recent trust decisions are like an order to a cook to "unscramble" the eggs which have just been prepared. [Proceedings of the Academy of Political Science," January 1912]
Related: Unscrambled; unscrambling.
unscriptural (adj.) Look up unscriptural at Dictionary.com
1650s, from un- (1) "not" + scriptural (adj.).
unscrupulous (adj.) Look up unscrupulous at Dictionary.com
1803, from un- (1) "not" + scrupulous (adj.). Related: Unscrupulously; unscrupulousness.
unseal (v.) Look up unseal at Dictionary.com
early 15c., from un- (2) "reverse, opposite of" + seal (v.). Similar formation in Middle Dutch ontsegelen, Old High German intsigilan. Related: Unsealed (late 14c.).
unsearchable (adj.) Look up unsearchable at Dictionary.com
late 14c., from un- (1) "not" + searchable (adj.).
unseasonable (adj.) Look up unseasonable at Dictionary.com
mid-15c., "inopportune," from un- (1) "not" + seasonable (adj.). In reference to weather, "not appropriate to the time of year," it is recorded from 1510s. Related: Unseasonably.