shapely (adj.) Look up shapely at Dictionary.com
"well-formed, having a regular and pleasing shape," late 14c., from shape (n.) + -ly (1). Related: Shapeliness.
shard (n.) Look up shard at Dictionary.com
also sherd, Old English sceard "incision, cleft, gap; potshard, a fragment, broken piece," from Proto-Germanic *skardas (cognates: Middle Dutch schaerde "a fragment, a crack," Dutch schaard "a flaw, a fragment," German Scharte "a notch," Danish skaar "chink, potsherd"), a past participle from the root of Old English sceran "to cut" (see shear). Meaning "fragment of broken earthenware" developed in late Old English. Used late 14c. as "scale of a dragon." French écharde "prickle, splinter" is a Germanic loan-word.
share (n.1) Look up share at Dictionary.com
"portion," Old English scearu "a cutting, shearing, tonsure; a part or division," related to sceran "to cut," from Proto-Germanic *skaro- (cognates: Old High German scara "troop, share of forced labor," German Schar "troop, band," properly "a part of an army," Old Norse skör "rim"), from PIE root *(s)ker- (1) "to cut" (see shear (v.)).

Meaning "part of the capital of a joint stock company" is first attested c.1600. Share and share alike attested from 1560s. The same Old English noun in the sense "division" led to an obsolete noun share "fork ('division') of the body at the groin; pubic region" (late Old English and Middle English); hence share-bone "pubis" (early 15c.).
share (n.2) Look up share at Dictionary.com
"iron blade of a plow," Old English scear, scær "plowshare," properly "that which cuts," from Proto-Germanic *skar- (cognates: Old Frisian skere, Middle Low German schar, Old High German scar, German Schar, Dutch ploegschaar, Middle High German pfluocschar), from PIE root *(s)ker- (1) "to cut" (see shear).
share (v.) Look up share at Dictionary.com
1580s, "to apportion to someone as his share; to apportion out to others; to enjoy or suffer (something) with others," from share (n.1). Meaning "to divide one's own and give part to others" is recorded from 1590s. Meaning "confess one's sins openly" (1932, implied in sharing) is from "the language of Moral Rearmament" [OED]. Related: Shared; sharer; sharing.
sharecropper (n.) Look up sharecropper at Dictionary.com
also share-cropper, 1887, in a U.S. Southern context; from share + agent noun from crop (v.). Share-crop system attested from 1871. As a verb, share-crop is recorded by 1867. Sharecropping attested by 1936.
shareholder (n.) Look up shareholder at Dictionary.com
c.1830, from share (n.1) in the financial sense + agent noun from hold (v.).
shareware (n.) Look up shareware at Dictionary.com
by 1982, from share (v.) + ware.
sharia (n.) Look up sharia at Dictionary.com
Islamic religious law, 1855, from Arabic shari'ah "the revealed law," from shar' "revelation."
sharif (n.) Look up sharif at Dictionary.com
1550s, shereef, from Arabic sharif "noble, glorious," from sharafa "to be exalted." A descendant of Muhammad through his daughter Fatima.
shark (n.) Look up shark at Dictionary.com
1560s, of uncertain origin; apparently the word and the first specimen were brought to London by Capt. John Hawkins's second expedition (landed 1565; see Hakluyt).
There is no proper name for it that I knowe, but that sertayne men of Captayne Haukinses doth call it a 'sharke' [handbill advertising an exhibition of the specimen, 1569]
The meaning "dishonest person who preys on others," though attested only from 1599 (sharker "artful swindler" in this sense is from 1594), may be the original sense, later transferred to the large, voracious marine fish. If so, it is possibly from German Schorck, a variant of Schurke "scoundrel, villain," agent noun of Middle High German schürgen (German schüren) "to poke, stir."

But on another theory, the English word is from a Mayan word, xoc, which might have meant "shark." Northern Europeans seem not to have been familiar with sharks before voyages to the tropics began. A slightly earlier name for it in English was tiburon, via Spanish (where it is attested by 1520s), from the Carib name for the fish.

The English word was applied (or re-applied) to voracious or predatory persons, on the image of the fish, from 1707 (originally of pick-pockets); loan shark is attested from 1905. Sharkskin (1851) was used for binding books, etc. As the name of a type of fabric held to resemble it, it is recorded from 1932.
There is the ordinary Brown Shark, or sea attorney, so called by sailors; a grasping, rapacious varlet, that in spite of the hard knocks received from it, often snapped viciously at our steering oar. [Herman Melville, "Mardi"]
shark (v.) Look up shark at Dictionary.com
c.1600, "to live by one's wits," of uncertain origin (see shark (n.)); according to OED, at least partly a variant of shirk. Meaning "obtain by sharking" is from 1610s. Related: Sharked; sharking.
sharn (n.) Look up sharn at Dictionary.com
Old English scearn "dung, muck," from Proto-Germanic *skarnom- (cognates: Old Frisian skern, Old Norse skarn, Danish skarn), a past participle form from *sker- "to cut" (see shear). Compare Old English scearnbudda "dung beetle," and Scottish Sharnie "a name given to the person who cleans a cow-house" [Jamieson].
Sharon Look up Sharon at Dictionary.com
fem. proper name; from the name of the fertile coastal plain between Jaffa and Mount Carmel, from Hebrew, short for yesharon, properly "the Plain," from stem of yashar "was straight, was even" (compare Hebrew mishor "level land, plain"). A top-10 list name for girls born in the U.S. between 1943 and 1949.
sharp (adj.) Look up sharp at Dictionary.com
Old English scearp "having a cutting edge; pointed; intellectually acute, active, shrewd; keen (of senses); severe; biting, bitter (of tastes)," from Proto-Germanic *skarpaz, literally "cutting" (cognates: Old Saxon scarp, Old Norse skarpr, Old Frisian skerp, Dutch scherp, German scharf "sharp"), from PIE *(s)ker- (1) "to cut" (cognates: Lettish skarbs "sharp," Middle Irish cerb "cutting;" see shear (v.)).

The figurative meaning "acute or penetrating in intellect or perception" was in Old English; hence "keenly alive to one's own interests, quick to take advantage" (1690s). Of words or talk, "cutting, sarcastic," from early 13c. Meaning "distinct in contour" is from 1670s. The adverbial meaning "abruptly" is from 1836; that of "promptly" is first attested 1840. The musical meaning "half step above (a given tone)" is from 1570s. Meaning "stylish" is from 1944, hepster slang, from earlier general slang sense of "excellent" (1940). Phrase sharp as a tack first recorded 1912 (sharp as a needle has been around since Old English). Sharp-shinned attested from 1704 of persons, 1813 of hawks.
sharp (n.) Look up sharp at Dictionary.com
"a cheat at games," 1797, short for sharper (1680s) in this sense. Meaning "expert, connoisseur" is attested from 1840, and likely is from sharp (adj.). Music sense is from 1570s. The noun was used 14c. as "a sharp weapon, edge of a sword."
sharpen (v.) Look up sharpen at Dictionary.com
1520s, "bring to an edge or point," from sharp (adj.) + -en (1). Related: Sharpened; sharpening. Old English verb scearpian meant "to score, scarify;" also compare scearpung "scarifying." To sharpen (one's) pencil "prepare to get to work" is from 1957, American English.
sharpener (n.) Look up sharpener at Dictionary.com
1630s, agent noun from sharpen.
sharper (n.) Look up sharper at Dictionary.com
1560s, "one who makes sharp," agent noun from obsolete verb sharp "to make sharp" (see sharp (adj.)). Meaning "swindler" is from 1680s, probably a variant of sharker (see shark (n.)). Shortened form sharpie is from 1942, also probably involving the "sharply dressed" sense of the adjective.
sharply (adv.) Look up sharply at Dictionary.com
Old English scearplice "acutely, keenly; painfully, severely; attentively, quickly;" see sharp (adj.) + -ly (2). Old English also had adverbial form scearpe "sharply."
sharpness (n.) Look up sharpness at Dictionary.com
Old English scearpnis; see sharp (adj.) + -ness.
Sharps (n.) Look up Sharps at Dictionary.com
type of breech-loading single-shot rifle, 1850, from J. Christian Sharps (1811-1874), U.S. gunsmith.
sharpshooter (n.) Look up sharpshooter at Dictionary.com
also sharp-shooter, 1800; see sharp (adj.) + shoot (v.). A translation of German Scharfschütze, from scharf (adj.) "sharp" + schütze "shooter," from schießen "to shoot." Related: Sharpshooting.
Shasta Look up Shasta at Dictionary.com
mountain in California, named for local native tribe, for whose name Bright offers no etymology.
shatter (v.) Look up shatter at Dictionary.com
early 14c., transitive, probably a variant of Middle English scateren (see scatter (v.)). Compare Old Dutch schetteren Low German schateren. Formations such as scatter-brained had parallel forms in shatter-brained, etc. Intransitive sense from 1560s. Related: Shattered; shattering. Carlyle (1841) used shatterment. Shatters "fragments" is from 1630s.
shattering (adj.) Look up shattering at Dictionary.com
1560s, present participle adjective from shatter (v.). Related: Shatteringly.
shave (v.) Look up shave at Dictionary.com
Old English sceafan (strong verb, past tense scof, past participle scafen), "to scrape, shave, polish," from Proto-Germanic *skaban (cognates: Old Norse skafa, Middle Dutch scaven, German schaben, Gothic skaban "scratch, shave, scrape"), from PIE *skabh-, collateral form of root *(s)kep- "to cut, to scrape, to hack" (see scabies). Related: Shaved; shaving. Original strong verb status is preserved in past tense form shaven. Specifically in reference to cutting the hair close from mid-13c. Figurative sense of "to strip (someone) of money or possessions" is attested from late 14c.
shave (n.) Look up shave at Dictionary.com
c.1600, "something shaved off;" from shave (v.); Old English sceafa meant "tool for shaving." Meaning "operation of shaving" is from 1838. Meaning "a grazing touch" is recorded from 1834. Phrase a close shave is from 1856, on notion of "a slight, grazing touch."
shaveling (n.) Look up shaveling at Dictionary.com
contemptuous term for a friar, literally "shaven person," 1520s, from shave + -ling. "Very common in 16th and 17th c." [OED]. Also as an adjective (1570s).
shaver (n.) Look up shaver at Dictionary.com
"one who shaves," early 15c., agent noun from shave (v.); sense of "fellow, chap" is slang from 1590s. Meaning "shaving tool" is from 1550s. Mad shaver (1610s) was 17c. slang for "a swashbuckler, roisterer."
Shavian (adj.) Look up Shavian at Dictionary.com
1903, "in the style or manner of George Bernard Shaw" (1856-1950), from Latinized form of his name. An earlier form was Shawian (1894).
shaving (n.) Look up shaving at Dictionary.com
"act of removing hair with a razor," also "thin slice taken off," late 14c., verbal noun from shave (v.).
shavuot (n.) Look up shavuot at Dictionary.com
1892, from Hebrew šabuot, plural of šabua "week."
shaw (n.) Look up shaw at Dictionary.com
"strip of wood forming the border of a field," 1570s, from Old English sceaga "copse," cognate with North Frisian skage "farthest edge of cultivated land," Old Norse skage "promontory," and perhaps with Old English sceaga "rough matted hair" (see shag (n.)). The Old English word also is the source of the surname Shaw (attested from late 12c.) and its related forms.
shawl (n.) Look up shawl at Dictionary.com
1660s, originally of a type of scarf worn in Asia, from Urdu and other Indian languages, from Persian shal, sometimes said to be named for Shaliat, town in India where it was first manufactured [Klein]. French châle, Spanish chal, Italian scialle, German Shawl (from English), Russian shal all are ultimately from the same source. As the name of an article of clothing worn by Western women, it is recorded from 1767.
shawm (n.) Look up shawm at Dictionary.com
"medieval oboe-like instrument," mid-14c., schalmeis (plural), also schallemele (late 14c.), from Old French chalemie, chalemel, from Late Latin calamellus, literally "a small reed," diminutive of Latin calamus "reed," from Greek kalamos, from PIE *kole-mo- "grass, reed" (cognates: Old English healm "straw," Latin culmus "stalk"). Mistaken as a plural and trimmed of its "-s" ending from mid-15c. Related: Shawmist.
Shawnee Look up Shawnee at Dictionary.com
Algonquian people, probably originally from what is now southern Ohio, 1670s, from Munsee sawanow, from Shawnee /ša:wanwa/, the people's self-designation, literally "person of the south."
shay (n.) Look up shay at Dictionary.com
1717, back-formation from chaise (q.v.), wrangled into English and mistaken for a plural.
shazam Look up shazam at Dictionary.com
invented word from "Captain Marvel" comics, 1940.
she (pron.) Look up she at Dictionary.com
mid-12c., probably evolving from Old English seo, sio (accusative sie), fem. of demonstrative pronoun (masc. se) "the," from PIE root *so- "this, that" (see the). The Old English word for "she" was heo, hio, however by 13c. the pronunciation of this had converged by phonetic evolution with he "he," which apparently led to the fem. demonstrative pronoun being used in place of the pronoun (compare similar development in Dutch zij, German sie, Greek he, etc.). The original h- survives in her. A relic of the Old English pronoun is in Manchester-area dialectal oo "she." As a noun meaning "a female," she is attested from 1530s.
she-devil (n.) Look up she-devil at Dictionary.com
"difficult woman," 1840, from she + devil (n.).
she-male (n.) Look up she-male at Dictionary.com
early 19c. U.S. colloquial, "a female, a woman," from she + male.
Davy Crockett's hand would be sure to shake if his iron was pointed within a hundred miles of a shemale. ["Treasury of American Folklore"]
This became obsolete, and by 1972 it had been recoined (disparagingly) for "masculine lesbian." The sense of "transsexual male" seems to date from c.1984.
sheaf (n.) Look up sheaf at Dictionary.com
Old English sceaf (plural sceafas) "large bundle of corn," from Proto-Germanic *skauf- (cognates: Old Saxon scof, Middle Dutch scoof, Dutch schoof, Old High German scoub "sheaf, bundle," German Schaub "sheaf;" Old Norse skauf "fox's tail;" Gothic skuft "hair on the head," German Schopf "tuft"), from PIE root *(s)keup- "cluster, tuft, hair of the head." Extended to bundles of things other than grain by c.1300. Also used in Middle English for "two dozen arrows." General sense of "a collection" is from 1728.
shear (v.) Look up shear at Dictionary.com
Old English sceran, scieran (class IV strong verb; past tense scear, past participle scoren) "to cleave, hew, cut with a sharp instrument; cut (hair); shear (sheep)," from Proto-Germanic *sker- "to cut" (cognates: Old Norse and Old Frisian skera, Dutch scheren, German scheren "to shear"), from PIE *(s)ker- (1) "to cut, to scrape, to hack" (cognates: Sanskrit krnati "hurts, wounds, kills," krntati "cuts;" Hittite karsh- "to cut off;" Greek keirein "to cut, shear;" Latin curtus "short;" Lithuanian skiriu "to separate;" Old Irish scaraim "I separate;" Welsh ysgar "to separate," ysgyr "fragment").
shear (n.) Look up shear at Dictionary.com
"act of clipping," 1610s, also as a unit of measure of the age of a sheep, from shear (v.). Scientific and mechanical sense "type of strain" is from 1850.
shears (n.) Look up shears at Dictionary.com
"large scissors," Old English scearra (plural) "shears, scissors," from Proto-Germanic *sker- "to cut" (cognates: Middle Dutch schaer, Old High German scara, German Schere; see shear (v.)). In 17c., also "a device for raising the masts of ships" (1620s). As "scissors," OED labels it Scottish and dialectal. Chalk is no shears (1640s) was noted as a Scottish proverb expressing the gap between planning and doing.
sheath (n.) Look up sheath at Dictionary.com
Old English sceað, scæð, from Proto-Germanic *skaithiz (cognates: Old Saxon scethia, Old Norse skeiðir (plural), Old Frisian skethe, Middle Dutch schede, Dutch schede, Old High German skaida, German scheide "a sheath, scabbard"), according to OED, possibly from root *skei- "divide, split" (see shed (v.)) on notion of a split stick with the sword blade inserted. Meaning "condom" is recorded from 1861; sense of "close-fitting dress or skirt" is attested from 1904.
sheathe (v.) Look up sheathe at Dictionary.com
c.1400, "to furnish (a sword, etc.) with a sheath," from sheath; meaning "to put (a sword, etc.) in a sheath" is attested from early 15c. Related: Sheathed; sheathing.
sheave (v.) Look up sheave at Dictionary.com
"to gather up in sheaves," 1570s; see sheaf. Related: Sheaved; sheaving. Earlier verb in this sense was simply sheaf (c.1500).
sheave (n.) Look up sheave at Dictionary.com
"grooved wheel to receive a cord, pulley" (mid-14c.), also "slice of bread" (late 14c.), related to shive (n.).