schadenfreude (n.) Look up schadenfreude at Dictionary.com
"malicious joy in the misfortunes of others," 1922, German Schadenfreude, literally "damage-joy," from schaden "damage, harm, injury" (see scathe) + freude, from Old High German frewida "joy," from fro "happy," literally "hopping for joy," from Proto-Germanic *frawa- (see frolic).
What a fearful thing is it that any language should have a word expressive of the pleasure which men feel at the calamities of others; for the existence of the word bears testimony to the existence of the thing. And yet in more than one such a word is found. ... In the Greek epikhairekakia, in the German, 'Schadenfreude.' [Richard C. Trench, "On the Study of Words," 1852]
schatzi (n.) Look up schatzi at Dictionary.com
"German girlfriend," from German Schatzi, diminutive of Schatz, a term of endearment for a woman, literally "treasure," from Proto-Germanic *skatta- (cognates: Dutch schat "treasure," Gothic skatts "piece of money, money"), originally "cattle."
schedule (n.) Look up schedule at Dictionary.com
late 14c., sedule, cedule "ticket, label, slip of paper with writing on it," from Old French cedule (Modern French cédule), from Late Latin schedula "strip of paper" (in Medieval Latin also "a note, schedule"), diminutive of Latin scheda, scida "one of the strips forming a papyrus sheet," from Greek skhida "splinter," from stem of skhizein "to cleave, split" (see shed (v.)). Also from the Latin word are Spanish cédula, German Zettel.

The notion is of slips of paper attached to a document as an appendix (a sense maintained in U.S. tax forms). The specific meaning "printed timetable" is first recorded 1863 in railway use. Modern spelling is a 15c. imitation of Latin, but pronunciation remained "sed-yul" for centuries afterward; the modern British pronunciation ("shed-yul") is from French influence, while the U.S. pronunciation ("sked-yul") is from the practice of Webster, based on the Greek original.
schedule (v.) Look up schedule at Dictionary.com
"make a schedule of, 1855; include in a schedule, 1862; from schedule (n.). Related: Scheduled; scheduling.
Scheherezade Look up Scheherezade at Dictionary.com
also Scheherazade, female narrator of the "Arabian Nights;" the name used by 1807 in reference to "(young, attractive, female) teller of long tales."
schema (n.) Look up schema at Dictionary.com
plural schemata, 1796, in Kantian philosophy ("a product of the imagination intermediary between an image and a concept"), from Greek skhema (see scheme (n.)). Meaning "diagrammatic representation" is from 1890; general sense of "hypothetical outline" is by 1939.
schematic (adj.) Look up schematic at Dictionary.com
"pertaining to schemes," 1701, from Latin stem of scheme (n.) + -ic. Noun meaning "diagram" is first attested 1929. Related: Schematical (1670s).
scheme (n.) Look up scheme at Dictionary.com
1550s, "figure of speech," from Medieval Latin schema "shape, figure, form, appearance; figure of speech; posture in dancing," from Greek skhema (genitive skhematos) "figure, appearance, the nature of a thing," related to skhein "to get," and ekhein "to have, hold; be in a given state or condition," from PIE root *segh- "to hold, to hold in one's power, to have" (cognates: Sanskrit sahate "he masters, overcomes," sahah "power, victory;" Avestan hazah "power, victory;" Greek ekhein "to have, hold;" Gothic sigis, Old High German sigu, Old Norse sigr, Old English sige "victory").

The sense "program of action" first is attested 1640s. Unfavorable overtones (selfish, devious) began to creep in early 18c. Meaning "complex unity of coordinated component elements" is from 1736. Color scheme is attested from 1884.
scheme (v.) Look up scheme at Dictionary.com
"devise a scheme," 1767 (earlier "reduce to a scheme," 1716), from scheme (n.). Related: Schemed; scheming.
schemer (n.) Look up schemer at Dictionary.com
1724, "a contriver, plotter," agent noun from scheme (v.).
Schenectady Look up Schenectady at Dictionary.com
place in New York state, from Mohawk (Iroquoian) skah-nehtati "the other side of the pines," containing -hneht- "pine tree."
scherzo (n.) Look up scherzo at Dictionary.com
1852, from Italian scherzo, literally "sport, joke," from scherzare "to jest or joke," from a Germanic source (compare Middle High German scherzen "to jump merrily, enjoy oneself," German scherz "sport"), from PIE *(s)ker- (2) "leap, jump about." The lively second or third movement in a multi-movement musical work. Scherzando is the Italian gerund of scherzare.
schism (n.) Look up schism at Dictionary.com
late 14c., scisme, "dissention within the church," from Old French scisme, cisme "a cleft, split" (12c.), from Church Latin schisma, from Greek skhisma (genitive skhismatos) "division, cleft," in New Testament applied metaphorically to divisions in the Church (I Cor. xii.25), from stem of skhizein "to split" (see shed (v.)). Spelling restored 16c., but pronunciation unchanged. Often in reference to the Great Schism (1378-1417) in the Western Church.
schismatic Look up schismatic at Dictionary.com
late 14c. (n.); mid-15c. (adj.), from Old French scismatique (Modern French schismatique), from Church Latin schismaticus, from Greek skhismatikos, from schisma (see schism). Used also as a noun in Old French and Late Latin. Related: Schismatical; schismatically.
schist (n.) Look up schist at Dictionary.com
type of layered metamorphic rock, 1795 (earlier schistus, c. 1600), from French schiste (16c.), from Latin schistos lapis "stone that splits easily" (Pliny), from Greek skhistos "divided, separated," from skhizein "to split" (see shed (v.)). The rock splits easily in layers. Liddell & Scott say Greek skhistos lithos was "probably talc."
schistosomiasis (n.) Look up schistosomiasis at Dictionary.com
1906, from schistosome (1905), from Modern Latin Schistosoma, from Greek skhistos "divided, cloven" (see schist) + soma "body" (see somato-).
schizo (n.) Look up schizo at Dictionary.com
1945 (n.), slang shortening of schizophrenic. Schiz in same sense is from 1955 as a noun, 1960 as an adjective.
schizo- Look up schizo- at Dictionary.com
word-forming element meaning "division; split, cleavage," from Latinized form of Greek skhizo-, comb. form of skhizein "to split, cleave, part, separate," from PIE root *skei- "to cut, separate, divide, part, split" (see shed (v.)).
schizoid (adj.) Look up schizoid at Dictionary.com
"resembling schizophrenia," 1925, from German schizoid (1921), from front part of schizophrenia + Greek -oeides "like," from eidos "form, shape" (see -oid).
schizophrenia (n.) Look up schizophrenia at Dictionary.com
1912, from Modern Latin, literally "a splitting of the mind," from German Schizophrenie, coined in 1910 by Swiss psychiatrist Eugen Bleuler (1857-1939), from Greek skhizein "to split" (see schizo-) + phren (genitive phrenos) "diaphragm, heart, mind," of unknown origin.
schizophrenic (adj.) Look up schizophrenic at Dictionary.com
1912; see schizophrenia + -ic. Also from 1912 as a noun, "schizophrenic person." Transferred adjectival sense of "contradictory, inconsistent" is by 1955.
schlemazel (n.) Look up schlemazel at Dictionary.com
also schlimazel, "born loser," 1948, from Yiddish shlim mazel "rotten luck," from Middle High German slim "crooked" + Hebrew mazzal "luck." British slang shemozzle "an unhappy plight" (1889) is probably from the same source.
A shlemiel is the fellow who climbs to the top of a ladder with a bucket of paint and then drops it. A shimazl is the fellow on whose head the bucket falls. [Rep. Stephen J. Solarz (D.-N.Y.), 1986]
schlemiel (n.) Look up schlemiel at Dictionary.com
"awkward, clumsy person," 1868, from Yiddish shlemiel "bungler," from main character in A. von Chamisso's German fable "The Wonderful History of Peter Schlemihl" (1813), probably from Biblical name Shelumiel (Num. i:6), chief of the tribe of Simeon, identified with the Simeonite prince Zimri ben Salu, who was killed while committing adultery. Compare schlemazel.
schlep (v.) Look up schlep at Dictionary.com
"to carry or drag," 1922 (in Joyce's "Ulysses"), from Yiddish shlepen "to drag," from Middle High German sleppen, related to Old High German sleifen "to drag," and slifan "to slide, slip" (cognate with Middle English slippen; see slip (v.)). Related: Schlepped; schlepping.
schlep (n.) Look up schlep at Dictionary.com
"stupid person, loser," 1939, short for schlepper "person of little worth" (1934), in Yiddish, "fool, beggar, scrounger," from schlep (v.) "to carry or drag" (for sense evolution, compare drag (n.) "annoying dull person").
schlock (n.) Look up schlock at Dictionary.com
"trash," 1915, from American Yiddish shlak, from German Schlacke "dregs, scum, dross" (see slag (n.)). Alternative etymology [OED] is from Yiddish shlogn "to strike" (cognate with German schlagen; see slay). Derived form schlockmeister "purveyor of cheap merchandise" is from 1965. Adjectival form schlocky is attested from 1968; schlock was used as an adjective from 1916.
schlong (n.) Look up schlong at Dictionary.com
"penis," 1969, from Yiddish shlang, literally "snake." Compare schmuck. As a verb, "to have sex with," by 2005. Related: Schlonged; schlonging.
schlub (n.) Look up schlub at Dictionary.com
"worthless oaf," 1964, from Yiddish, perhaps from Polish żłób in a sense "blockhead."
schm- Look up schm- at Dictionary.com
substituted for the initial sound of a word and reduplicated with it to convey derision (as in "Oedipus schmoedipus" in the punchline of the old joke about the Jewish mother and the psychiatrist), 1929, from the numerous Yiddish words that begin with this sound.
schmaltz (n.) Look up schmaltz at Dictionary.com
"banal or excessive sentimentalism," 1935, from Yiddish shmalts, literally "melted fat," from Middle High German smalz, from Old High German smalz "animal fat," related to smelzan "to melt" (see smelt (v.)). Modern German Schmalz "fat, grease" has the same figurative meaning. First mentioned in English as "a derogatory term used to describe straight jazz" ["Vanity Fair," Nov. 1935].
schmaltzy (adj.) Look up schmaltzy at Dictionary.com
1935, from schmaltz + -y (2). Related: Schmaltziness.
schmear (n.) Look up schmear at Dictionary.com
1961, "bribery," from Yiddish shmir "spread," from shmirn "to grease, smear," from Middle High German smiren, from Old High German smirwen "to smear" (see smear (v.); compare slang to grease (someone's) palm "to bribe"). Phrase the whole schmear "the entire affair" is attested from 1969, originally show business jargon,
schmendrick (n.) Look up schmendrick at Dictionary.com
"stupid person," 1944, from Yiddish shmendrik, from the name of a character in an 1877 operetta ("Shmendrik, oder Di komishe Chaseneh") by Avrom Goldfaden (1840-1908), "Father of Yiddish Theater."
Schmidt (n.) Look up Schmidt at Dictionary.com
type of astronomical telescope lens used for photography, 1939, from Estonian-born German optician Bernhard Voldemar Schmidt (1879-1935), who invented it.
schmoe (n.) Look up schmoe at Dictionary.com
also schmo, "idiot, fool," 1948, euphemized form of schmuck.
schmoo (n.) Look up schmoo at Dictionary.com
fabulous animal, ready to fulfill man's wants, 1948, invented by U.S. cartoonist Al Capp (Alfred Caplin, 1909-1979); the name perhaps based on schmoe.
schmooze (v.) Look up schmooze at Dictionary.com
also shmooze, "to chat intimately," 1897, from Yiddish shmuesn "to chat," from shmues "idle talk, chat," from Hebrew shemu'oth "news, rumors." As a noun from 1939. Related: Schmoozed; schmoozing. Schmoozer is from 1909.
schmuck (n.) Look up schmuck at Dictionary.com
also shmuck, "contemptible person," 1892, from East Yiddish shmok, literally "penis," probably from Old Polish smok "grass snake, dragon," and likely not the same word as German Schmuck "jewelry, adornments," which is related to Low German smuck "supple, tidy, trim, elegant," and to Old Norse smjuga "slip, step through" (see smock).

In Jewish homes, the word was "regarded as so vulgar as to be taboo" [Leo Rosten, "The Joys of Yiddish," 1968] and Lenny Bruce wrote that saying it on stage got him arrested on the West Coast "by a Yiddish undercover agent who had been placed in the club several nights running to determine if my use of Yiddish terms was a cover for profanity." Euphemized as schmoe, which was the source of Al Capp's cartoon strip creature the shmoo.

"[A]dditional associative effects from German schmuck 'jewels, decoration' cannot be excluded (cross-linguistically commonplace slang: cf. Eng. 'family jewels')" [Mark R.V. Southern, "Contagious Couplings: Transmission of Expressives in Yiddish Echo Phrases," 2005]. But the English phrase refers to the testicles and is a play on words, the "family" element being the essential ones. Words for "decoration" seem not to be among the productive sources of European "penis" slang terms.
schnapps (n.) Look up schnapps at Dictionary.com
1818, kind of Holland gin, from German Schnaps, literally "a mouthful, gulp," from Low German snaps, from snappen "to snap" (see snap (v.)). For sense, compare nip for "alcoholic drink quickly taken."
schnauzer (n.) Look up schnauzer at Dictionary.com
breed of terrier, 1923, from German Schnauzer, literally "growler," from schnauzen "to snarl, growl," from Schnauze "snout, muzzle," which is related to Middle English snute, snoute "snout" (see snout).
schnitzel (n.) Look up schnitzel at Dictionary.com
veal cutlet, 1854, from German Schnitzel "cutlet," literally "a slice," with -el, diminutive suffix + Schnitz "a cut, slice" (+ -el, diminutive suffix), from schnitzen "to carve," frequentative of schneiden "to cut," from Old High German snidan, cognate with Old English sniþan "to cut," from Proto-Germanic *snitt-ja-, from PIE root *sneit- "to cut."
schnook (n.) Look up schnook at Dictionary.com
1948, probably from Yiddish shnuk "elephant's trunk," or altered from schmuck (q.v.), or perhaps from German schnucke "a small sheep," used in U.S. Yiddish for "a customer easily persuaded, a sucker."
schnorrer (n.) Look up schnorrer at Dictionary.com
1892, from Yiddish, "beggar," from German slang schnurrer, from schnurren "to go begging" (slang), perhaps ultimately imitative of the sound of pleading or whining (compare sneer, snorkel, snarl).
schnozz (n.) Look up schnozz at Dictionary.com
"nose," 1942, from Yiddish shnoitsl, from German Schnauze "snout" (see schnauzer).
scholar (n.) Look up scholar at Dictionary.com
Old English scolere "student," from Medieval Latin scholaris, noun use of Late Latin scholaris "of a school," from Latin schola (see school (n.1)). Greek scholastes meant "one who lives at ease." The Medieval Latin word was widely borrowed (Old French escoler, French écolier, Old High German scuolari, German Schüler). The modern English word might be a Middle English reborrowing from French. Fowler points out that in British English it typically has been restricted to those who attend a school on a scholarship.
scholarly (adj.) Look up scholarly at Dictionary.com
1630s, from scholar + -ly (1). Related: Scholarliness.
scholarship (n.) Look up scholarship at Dictionary.com
1530s, "status of a scholar," from scholar + -ship. Meaning "learning, erudition" is from 1580s; sense of "source of funds for support or maintenance of a scholar" is from 1580s.
scholastic (adj.) Look up scholastic at Dictionary.com
1590s, "of or pertaining to Scholastic theologians" (Churchmen in the Middle Ages whose theology and philosophy was based on Church Fathers and Aristotle), from Middle French scholastique (14c.), from Latin scholasticus "of a school," from Greek skholastikos "enjoying leisure; devoting one's leisure to learning," hence, as a noun, "a scholar," also in a bad sense, "a pedant; a simpleton," from skhola (see school (n.1)). In English, meaning "pertaining to schools or to school education" is from 1640s. As a noun from 1640s. Related: Scholastical (1530s in the "relating to a school" sense); scholastically.
Scholasticism (n.) Look up Scholasticism at Dictionary.com
1732, from scholastic + -ism.
scholiast (n.) Look up scholiast at Dictionary.com
"one who writes explanatory notes upon a classical writer," 1580s, from Late Latin scholiasta, from Late Greek skholiastes, from skholiazein, from skholion "explanatory note or comment," from skhole (see school (n.1)). Related: Scholiastic.