promnesia (n.) Look up promnesia at Dictionary.com
scientific name for the phenomenon of déjà vu, 1895, Modern Latin, from Greek pro- "before" (see pro-) + -mnesia "memory" (see mind (n.)).
promo (n.) Look up promo at Dictionary.com
1958 (in "Billboard" headlines), shortening of promotion in the sense "advertising, publicity."
promontory (n.) Look up promontory at Dictionary.com
1540s, from Middle French promontoire (15c.) and directly from Medieval Latin promontorium, altered (by influence of Latin mons "mount, hill") from Latin promunturium "mountain ridge, headland," probably related to prominere "jut out" (see prominent).
promote (v.) Look up promote at Dictionary.com
late 14c., "to advance (someone) to a higher grade or office," from Old French promoter and directly from Latin promotus, past participle of promovere "move forward, advance; cause to advance, push onward; bring to light, reveal," from pro- "forward" (see pro-) + movere "to move" (see move (v.)). General sense of "to further the growth or progress of (anything)" is from 1510s. Related: Promoted; promoting.
promoter (n.) Look up promoter at Dictionary.com
late 14c., "one who promotes" (the interest of someone), "supporter," agent noun from promote, and also from Old French promoteur and directly from Medieval Latin promotor. Specific financial sense of "one who leads in forming a company" is from 1876; sense of "one who organizes sporting or entertainment events" is attested from 1936.
promotion (n.) Look up promotion at Dictionary.com
c.1400, "advancement in rank or position," from Old French promocion "election, promotion" (14c., Modern French promotion) and directly from Latin promotionem (nominative promotio) "a moving forward," noun of action from past participle stem of promovere (see promote). Meaning "advertising, publicity" first recorded 1925.
promotional (adj.) Look up promotional at Dictionary.com
1869, "relating to promotion or advancement," from promotion + -al (1). From 1902 as "relating to advertising."
prompt (v.) Look up prompt at Dictionary.com
mid-14c., prompten, from Latin promptus, past participle of promere "to bring forth," from pro- "forward" (see pro-) + emere "to take" (see exempt (adj.)). Theatrical sense of "to assist a speaker with lines" is first recorded early 15c. Related: Prompted; prompting.
prompt (n.) Look up prompt at Dictionary.com
early 15c., "readiness," from Latin promptus (see prompt (v.)). Meaning "hint, act of prompting" is from 1590s. Computer sense attested by 1977.
prompt (adj.) Look up prompt at Dictionary.com
early 15c., from Old French prompt and directly from Latin promptus "brought forth," hence "visible, apparent, evident," past participle of promere "to take or bring out or forth" (see prompt (v.)).Related: Promptly; promptitude.
prompter (n.) Look up prompter at Dictionary.com
1540s, agent noun from prompt (v.)). Earlier was promptator (mid-15c.).
promptness (n.) Look up promptness at Dictionary.com
1520s, from prompt (adj.) + -ness.
promulgate (v.) Look up promulgate at Dictionary.com
1520s, from Latin promulgatus, past participle of promulgare "make publicly known, propose openly, publish," perhaps altered from provulgare, from pro- "forth" (see pro-) + vulgare "make public, publish." Or the second element might be from mulgere "to milk" (see milk (n.)), used metaphorically for "cause to emerge." Related: Promulgated; promulgating. The earlier verb in English was promulge (late 15c.).
promulgation (n.) Look up promulgation at Dictionary.com
c.1600, from Middle French promulgation (14c.), from Latin promulgationem (nominative promulgatio) "a public announcement," noun of action from past participle stem of promulgare (see promulgate).
pronate Look up pronate at Dictionary.com
1848 (adj.); 1819 (v.), from Late Latin pronatus, past participle of pronare "to bend forward," from pronus "prone" (see prone). Related: Pronated; pronating.
pronation (n.) Look up pronation at Dictionary.com
1660s, from French pronation, from Medieval Latin pronationem (nominative pronatio), noun of action from past participle stem of Late Latin pronare (see pronate).
prone (adj.) Look up prone at Dictionary.com
c.1400, "naturally inclined to something, apt, liable," from Latin pronus "bent forward, leaning forward, bent over," figuratively "inclined to, disposed," perhaps from adverbial form of pro- "before, for, instead of" (see pro-) + ending as in infernus, externus. Meaning "lying face-down" is first recorded 1570s. Literal and figurative senses both were in Latin; figurative is older in English. Related: Proneness.
prong (n.) Look up prong at Dictionary.com
early 15c., prange "pointed instrument;" mid-15c., pronge "pain," from Anglo-Latin pronga "prong, pointed tool," of unknown origin, perhaps related to Middle Low German prange "stick, restraining device," prangen "to press, pinch." See also prod, which might be related. Prong-horned antelope is from 1815 (short form pronghorn attested from 1826).
pronomial (adj.) Look up pronomial at Dictionary.com
1670s, from Late Latin pronomialis (Priscian) "pertaining to a pronoun," from Latin pronomen (see pronoun). As a noun from 1871.
pronoun (n.) Look up pronoun at Dictionary.com
mid-15c., from pro- and noun; modeled on Middle French pronom, from Latin pronomen, from pro- "in place of" + nomen "name, noun" (see name (n.)). A loan-translation of Greek antonymia.
pronounce (v.) Look up pronounce at Dictionary.com
early 14c., "to declare officially;" late 14c., "to speak, utter," from Old French prononcier "declare, speak out, pronounce" (late 13c., Modern French prononcer), from Late Latin pronunciare, from Latin pronuntiare "to proclaim, announce; pronounce, utter," from pro- "forth, out, in public" (see pro-) + nuntiare "announce," from nuntius "messenger" (see nuncio). With reference to the mode of sounding words or languages, it is attested from 1620s (but see pronunciation in this sense from early 15c.). Related: Pronounced; pronouncing.
pronounceable (adj.) Look up pronounceable at Dictionary.com
1610s, from pronounce (v.) + -able.
pronounced (adj.) Look up pronounced at Dictionary.com
"spoken," 1570s, past participle adjective from pronounce (v.). Sense of "emphatic" is a figurative meaning first attested c.1730.
pronouncement (n.) Look up pronouncement at Dictionary.com
1590s, from pronounce + -ment.
pronto (adv.) Look up pronto at Dictionary.com
1850, from Spanish pronto, perhaps influenced by Italian pronto (borrowed by English 1740), both from Latin promptus (see prompt).
pronunciation (n.) Look up pronunciation at Dictionary.com
early 15c., "mode in which a word is pronounced," from Middle French prononciation and directly from Latin pronuntiationem (nominative pronuntiatio) "act of speaking, utterance, delivery," also "proclamation, public declaration," noun of action from past participle stem of pronuntiare "announce" (see pronounce).
proof (n.) Look up proof at Dictionary.com
early 13c., preove "evidence to establish the fact of (something)," from Anglo-French preove, Old French prueve "proof, test, experience" (13c., Modern French preuve), from Late Latin proba "a proof," a back-formation from Latin probare "to prove" (see prove). "The devocalization of v to f ensued upon the loss of final e; cf. the relation of v and f in believe, belief, relieve, relief, behove, behoof, etc. [OED].

Meaning "act of proving" is early 14c. Meaning "act of testing or making trial of anything" is from late 14c., from influence of prove. Meaning "standard of strength of distilled liquor" is from 1705. In photography from 1855. Typographical sense of "trial impression to test type" is from c.1600. Numismatic sense of "coin struck to test a die" is from 1762; now mostly in reference to coins struck from highly polished dies, mainly for collectors.

Adjectival sense (proof against) is recorded from 1590s, from the noun in expressions such as proof of (mid-15c.), hence extended senses involving "tested power" in compounds such as fireproof (1630s), waterproof (1725), foolproof (1902), etc. Shakespeare has shame-proof.
proof (v.) Look up proof at Dictionary.com
1834, "to test," from proof (n.). From 1950 as short for proofread (v.). Related: Proofed; proofing.
proofread (v.) Look up proofread at Dictionary.com
also proof-read, 1878, back-formation from proofreader. Related: Proofread; Proofreading.
proofreader (n.) Look up proofreader at Dictionary.com
also proof-reader, 1808, from proof (n.) in the typographical sense + reader.
prop (v.) Look up prop at Dictionary.com
"to support," mid-15c., probably from prop (n.1) or a related verb in Dutch. Related: Propped; propping.
prop (n.1) Look up prop at Dictionary.com
"support," mid-15c., from Middle Dutch proppe "vine prop, support," of unknown origin. Probably related to Old High German pfropfo, German pfropfen "to prop," perhaps from Latin propago "a set, layer of a plant" (see propagation). Irish propa, Gaelic prop are from English.
prop (n.2) Look up prop at Dictionary.com
"object used in a play," 1898, from props (1841), shortened form of properties (which was in theatrical use from early 15c.). Props as slang shortening for proper respects (or something similar) appeared c.1999.
prop (n.3) Look up prop at Dictionary.com
short for propeller, 1914.
propaedeutic (n.) Look up propaedeutic at Dictionary.com
1798, from Greek propaideuein "to teach beforehand," from pro- (see pro-) + paideuein "to teach," which is related to the root of pedagogue. From 1849 as an adjective.
propaganda (n.) Look up propaganda at Dictionary.com
1718, "committee of cardinals in charge of Catholic missionary work," short for Congregatio de Propaganda Fide "congregation for propagating the faith," a committee of cardinals established 1622 by Gregory XV to supervise foreign missions. The word is properly the ablative fem. gerundive of Latin propagare (see propagation). Hence, "any movement to propagate some practice or ideology" (1790). Modern political sense dates from World War I, not originally pejorative. Meaning "material or information propagated to advance a cause, etc." is from 1929.
propagandist (n.) Look up propagandist at Dictionary.com
1797, from propaganda + -ist. Related: Propagandistic.
propagandize (v.) Look up propagandize at Dictionary.com
1841, from propaganda + -ize. Related: Propagandized; propagandizing.
propagate (v.) Look up propagate at Dictionary.com
1560s, "to cause to multiply," from Latin propagatus, past participle of propagare "to set forward, extend, procreate" (see propagation). Intransitive sense "reproduce one's kind" is from c.1600. Related: Propagated; propagating.
propagation (n.) Look up propagation at Dictionary.com
mid-15c., from Old French propagacion "offshoot, offspring" (13c.) and directly from Latin propagationem (nominative propagatio) "a propagation, extension, enlargement," noun of action from past participle stem of propagare "set forward, extend, spread, increase; multiply plants by layers, breed," from propago (genitive propaginis) "that which propagates, offspring," from pro- "forth" (see pro-) + *pag-, root of pangere "to fasten" (see pact).
propane (n.) Look up propane at Dictionary.com
"colorless gas occurring in petroleum," 1866, with chemical suffix -ane + prop(ionic acid) (1850), from French propionique (1847), from Greek pro "forward" (see pro-) + pion "fat" (see fat (adj.)), in reference to its being first in order of the fatty acids.
propel (v.) Look up propel at Dictionary.com
mid-15c., "to drive away, expel," from Latin propellere "push forward, drive forward, drive forth; move, impel," from pro- "forward" (see pro-) + pellere "to push, drive" (see pulse (n.1)). Meaning "to drive onward, cause to move forward" is from 1650s. Related: Propelled; propelling.
propellant (n.) Look up propellant at Dictionary.com
less-etymological, but more usual, spelling of propellent; 1881 as a firearm explosive; 1919 as "fuel for a rocket engine."
propellent (adj.) Look up propellent at Dictionary.com
1640s, from propel + -ent. As a noun from 1814.
propeller (n.) Look up propeller at Dictionary.com
1780, "anything that propels," agent noun from propel. In mechanical sense, 1809, of ships; of flying machines (in a broad, theoretical sense) 1842, in the specific modern sense 1853.
propensity (n.) Look up propensity at Dictionary.com
1560s, "disposition to favor," with -ty + obsolete adjective propense "inclined, prone" (1520s), from Latin propensus, past participle of propendere "incline to, hang forward, hang down, weigh over," from pro- "forward" (see pro-) + pendere "hang" (see pendant).
proper (adj.) Look up proper at Dictionary.com
c.1300, "adapted to some purpose, fit, apt; commendable, excellent" (sometimes ironic), from Old French propre "own, particular; exact, neat, fitting, appropriate" (11c.), from Latin proprius "one's own, particular to itself," from pro privo "for the individual, in particular," from ablative of privus "one's own, individual" (see private (adj.)) + pro "for" (see pro-). Related: Properly.

From early 14c. as "belonging or pertaining to oneself; individual; intrinsic;" from mid-14c. as "pertaining to a person or thing in particular, special, specific; distinctive, characteristic;" also "what is by the rules, correct, appropriate, acceptable." From early 15c. as "separate, distinct; itself." Meaning "socially appropriate, decent, respectable" is first recorded 1704. Proper name "name belonging to or relating to the person or thing in question," is from late 13c., a sense also preserved in astronomical proper motion (c.1300). Proper noun is from c.1500.
propertied (adj.) Look up propertied at Dictionary.com
"holding property," 1760, from property (n.).
property (n.) Look up property at Dictionary.com
c.1300, properte, "nature, quality," later "possession, thing owned" (early 14c., a sense rare before 17c.), from an Anglo-French modification of Old French propriete "individuality, peculiarity; property" (12c., Modern French propreté; see propriety), from Latin proprietatem (nominative proprietas) "ownership, a property, propriety, quality," literally "special character" (a loan-translation of Greek idioma), noun of quality from proprius "one's own, special" (see proper). For "possessions, private property" Middle English sometimes used proper goods. Hot property "sensation, a success" is from 1947 in "Billboard" stories.
prophase Look up prophase at Dictionary.com
1884, from German prophase (Strasburger, 1884); see pro- + phase.