pat (adv.) Look up pat at Dictionary.com
"aptly, suitably, at the right time," 1570s, perhaps from pat (adj.) in sense of "that which hits the mark," a special use from pat (n.) in sense of "a hitting" of the mark. The modern adjective is 1630s, from the adverb.
pat (v.) Look up pat at Dictionary.com
1560s, "to hit, throw;" meaning "to tap or strike lightly" is from 1714; from pat (n.). Related: Patted; patting. The nursery rhyme phrase pat-a-cake is known from 1823. Alternative patty-cake (usually American English) is attested from 1794 (in "Mother Goose's Melody, or Sonnets for the Cradle," Worcester, Mass.).
Pat Look up Pat at Dictionary.com
as a fem. proper name, short for Patricia. As a masc. proper name, short for Patrick; hence a nickname for any Irishman.
Patagonia Look up Patagonia at Dictionary.com
South American region, with -ia + Patagon, name given by Europeans to the Tehuelche people who inhabited the coasts of the region, sometimes said to mean literally "large-foot," from Spanish and Portuguese pata "paw, animal foot" (see patten) in reference to the people's llama-skin shoes. But elsewhere said to be from Patagon, name of a dog-headed monster in the prose romance "Amadís de Gaula" (1508) by Garci Ordóñez de Montalvo (which also might have yielded California).
patch (v.) Look up patch at Dictionary.com
mid-15c., from patch (n.1). Electronics sense of "to connect temporarily" is attested from 1923. Related: Patched; patching.
patch (n.1) Look up patch at Dictionary.com
"piece of cloth used to mend another material," late 14c., of obscure origin, perhaps a variant of pece, pieche, from Old North French pieche (see piece (n.)), or from an unrecorded Old English word (but Old English had claðflyhte "a patch"). Phrase not a patch on "nowhere near as good as" is from 1860.
patch (n.2) Look up patch at Dictionary.com
"fool, clown," 1540s, perhaps from Italian pazzo "fool," of unknown origin. Possibly from Old High German barzjan "to rave" [Klein]. But Buck says pazzo is originally euphemistic, and from Latin patiens "suffering," in medical use, "the patient." Form perhaps influenced by folk etymology derivation from patch (n.1), on notion of a fool's patched garb.
patchouli (n.) Look up patchouli at Dictionary.com
perfume made from an Indian plant of the mint family, 1845, from the native name for the plant in Madras, said to be from Tamil pachchai "green" + ilai "leaf." The form of the word appears French, but this has not been explained and the record of it in English predates that in French.
patchwork (n.) Look up patchwork at Dictionary.com
"work composed of patches," 1690s, from patch (n.1) + work (n.). As an adjective from 1713.
patchy (adj.) Look up patchy at Dictionary.com
1798, from patch (n.1) + -y (2).
pate (n.1) Look up pate at Dictionary.com
"top of the head," early 14c. (late 12c. in surnames), of unknown origin; perhaps a shortened form of Old French patene or Medieval Latin patena, both from Latin patina "pan, dish" (see pan (n.)).
pate (n.2) Look up pate at Dictionary.com
"paste," 1706, from French pâté, from Old French paste, earlier pastée, from paste (see paste (n.)).
patella (n.) Look up patella at Dictionary.com
"knee cap," 1690s, from Latin patella "pan, kneecap," diminutive of patina "pan" (see pan (n.)). So called from its shape. Related: Patellar; patelliform.
paten (n.) Look up paten at Dictionary.com
"plate for bread at Eucharist," c.1300, from Old French patene and directly, from Medieval Latin patena, from Latin patina "pan, dish" (see pan (n.)).
patency (n.) Look up patency at Dictionary.com
1650s, from patent + -cy.
patent (n.) Look up patent at Dictionary.com
late 14c., "open letter or document from some authority," shortened form of Anglo-French lettre patent (also in Medieval Latin (litteræ) patentes), literally "open letter" (late 13c.), from Old French patente (see patent (adj.).
The Letters Patent were ... written upon open sheets of parchment, with the Great Seal pendent at the bottom ... [while] the 'Litteræ Clausæ,' or Letters Close, ... being of a more private nature, and addressed to one or two individuals only, were closed or folded up and sealed on the outside. [S.R. Scargill-Bird, "A Guide to the Principal Classes of Documents at the Public Record Office," 1891]
Meaning "a license covering an invention" is from 1580s.
patent (v.) Look up patent at Dictionary.com
"to obtain right to land," 1670s, from patent (n.). The meaning "copyright an invention" is first recorded 1822, from earlier meaning "obtain exclusive right or monopoly" (1789), a privilege granted by the Crown via letters patent. Related: Patented; patenting.
patent (adj.) Look up patent at Dictionary.com
late 14c., in letters patent, literally "open letter," from Old French patente, from Latin patentum (nominative patens) "open, lying open," present participle of patere "lie open, be open," from PIE *pete- "to spread" (see pace (n.)). Sense of "open to view, plain, clear" is first recorded c.1500. Related: Patently.
paterfamilias (n.) Look up paterfamilias at Dictionary.com
early 15c., from Latin pater familias "master of a house, head of a family," from pater "father" (see father (n.)) + familias, old genitive of familia "family" (see family).
paternal (adj.) Look up paternal at Dictionary.com
early 15c., from Old French paternal "of a father" (12c.), from Medieval Latin paternalis, from Latin paternus "of a father, fatherly," from pater (see father (n.)).
paternalism (n.) Look up paternalism at Dictionary.com
"feeling of a father for his children," 1851; "government as by a father over his children," 1866, from paternal + -ism. Related: Paternalistic (1890).
paternity (n.) Look up paternity at Dictionary.com
mid-15c., "condition of being a father," from Old French paternité (12c.), from Late Latin paternitatem (nominative paternitas) "fatherly care, fatherhood," from Latin paternus "of a father," from pater (see father (n.)). Originally in the ecclesiastical sense; literal sense first recorded 1580s. Meaning "paternal origin" is from 1868.
paternoster (n.) Look up paternoster at Dictionary.com
"the Lord's Prayer," Old English Pater Noster, from Latin pater noster "our father," first words of the Lord's Prayer in Latin. Meaning "set of rosary beads" first recorded mid-13c. Paternoster Row, near St. Paul's in London (similarly named streets are found in other cathedral cities), reflects the once-important industry of rosary bead-making.
path (n.) Look up path at Dictionary.com
Old English paþ, pæþ "path, track," from West Germanic *patha- (cognates: Old Frisian path, Middle Dutch pat, Dutch pad, Old High German pfad, German Pfad "path"), of uncertain origin. The original initial -p- in a Germanic word is an etymological puzzle. Don Ringe ("From Proto-Indo-European to Proto-Germanic," Oxford 2006) describes it as "An obvious loan from Iranian ..., clearly borrowed after Grimm’s Law had run its course." Watkins says the word is "probably borrowed (? via Scythian) from Iranian *path-," from PIE root *pent- "to tread, go, pass" (source of Avestan patha "way;" see find (v.)), but this is too much of a stretch for OED and others. In Scotland and Northern England, commonly a steep ascent of a hill or in a road.
Pathet Lao Look up Pathet Lao at Dictionary.com
communist guerrilla movement and political party in Laos, 1954, from Laotian Thai, literally "Land of the Lao."
pathetic (adj.) Look up pathetic at Dictionary.com
1590s, "affecting the emotions, exciting the passions," from Middle French pathétique "moving, stirring, affecting" (16c.), from Late Latin patheticus, from Greek pathetikos "subject to feeling, sensitive, capable of emotion," from pathetos "liable to suffer," verbal adjective of pathein "to suffer" (see pathos). Meaning "arousing pity, pitiful" is first recorded 1737. Colloquial sense of "so miserable as to be ridiculous" is attested from 1937. Related: Pathetical (1570s); pathetically. Pathetic fallacy (1856, first used by Ruskin) is the attribution of human qualities to inanimate objects.
pathfinder (n.) Look up pathfinder at Dictionary.com
1839 (Cooper), from path + finder.
pathless (adj.) Look up pathless at Dictionary.com
1590s, from path + -less.
patho- Look up patho- at Dictionary.com
before vowels path-, word-forming element meaning "Suffering, disease," from Greek patho-, comb. form of pathos "suffering, disease" (see pathos).
pathogen (n.) Look up pathogen at Dictionary.com
1880, a back-formation from pathogenic.
pathogenesis (n.) Look up pathogenesis at Dictionary.com
1876, from patho- + genesis.
pathogenic (adj.) Look up pathogenic at Dictionary.com
"producing disease," 1836, from French pathogénique, from Greek pathos "disease" (see pathos) + French -génique "producing" (see -gen). Related: Pathogenetic (1838); pathogenicity.
pathognomonic (adj.) Look up pathognomonic at Dictionary.com
1640s (implied in pathognomonical), from patho- "disease, suffering" + Greek gnomonikos "able to judge," from gnomon "one who knows" (see gnomon).
pathologic (adj.) Look up pathologic at Dictionary.com
"pertaining to pathology," 1650s, from Greek pathologikos (see pathology).
pathological (adj.) Look up pathological at Dictionary.com
1680s, "pertaining to disease," formed in English from pathologic + -al (1). Sense of "worthy to be a subject of pathology, morbid, excessive" (as in pathological liar) is attested from 1845. Related: Pathologically.
pathologist (n.) Look up pathologist at Dictionary.com
1640s, from pathology + -ist.
pathology (n.) Look up pathology at Dictionary.com
"science of diseases," 1610s, from French pathologie (16c.), from medical Latin pathologia "study of disease," from Greek pathos "suffering" (see pathos) + -logia "study" (see -logy). In reference to the study of abnormal mental conditions from 1842. Ancient Greek pathologia was "study of the passions;" the Greek word for "science of diseases" was pathologike ("pathologics").
pathophysiology (adj.) Look up pathophysiology at Dictionary.com
1952, from patho- + physiology.
pathos (n.) Look up pathos at Dictionary.com
"quality that arouses pity or sorrow," 1660s, from Greek pathos "suffering, feeling, emotion, calamity," literally "what befalls one," related to paskhein "to suffer," and penthos "grief, sorrow;" from PIE root *kwent(h)- "to suffer, endure" (cognates: Old Irish cessaim "I suffer," Lithuanian kenčiu "to suffer," pakanta "patience").
pathway (n.) Look up pathway at Dictionary.com
1530s, from path + way (n.). An etymological tautology.
patience (n.) Look up patience at Dictionary.com
c.1200, "quality of being willing to bear adversities, calm endurance of misfortune, suffering, etc.," from Old French pacience "patience; sufferance, permission" (12c.) and directly from Latin patientia "patience, endurance, submission," also "indulgence, leniency; humility; submissiveness; submission to lust;" literally "quality of suffering." It is an abstract noun formed from the adjective patientem (nominative patiens) "bearing, supporting; suffering, enduring, permitting; tolerant," but also "firm, unyielding, hard," used of persons as well as of navigable rivers, present participle of pati "to suffer, endure," from PIE root *pe(i)- "to damage, injure, hurt" (see passion).
Patience, n. A minor form of despair, disguised as a virtue. [Ambrose Bierce, "Devil's Dictionary," 1911]
Meaning "constancy in effort" is attested from 1510s. Meaning "card game for one person" is from 1816.
patient (adj.) Look up patient at Dictionary.com
mid-14c., "enduring without complaint," from Old French pacient and directly from Latin patientem "bearing, supporting, suffering, enduring, permitting" (see patience). Meaning "pertaining to a medical patient" is late 14c., from the noun. Related: Patiently.
patient (n.) Look up patient at Dictionary.com
"suffering or sick person under medical treatment," late 14c., from Old French pacient (n.), from the adjective, from Latin patientem (see patience).
patina (n.) Look up patina at Dictionary.com
"greenish film on old bronze," 1748, from French patine (18c.), from Italian patina, perhaps from Latin patina "dish, pan" (see pan (n.)), on the notion of encrustation on ancient bronze dishes. Sense of "refinement, cultural sophistication" first recorded 1933.
patio (n.) Look up patio at Dictionary.com
1818, "inner court open to the sky," from Spanish patio probably from Old Provençal patu, pati "untilled land, communal pasture," from Latin pactum "agreement" (see pact). Another theory traces the Spanish word to Latin patere "to lie open." Meaning "paved and enclosed terrace beside a building" first recorded 1941. Patio furniture is attested from 1969.
patisserie (n.) Look up patisserie at Dictionary.com
1784, from French pâtisserie "pastry shop," from pâtisser "pastry-seller, pastry-cook," from Old French pasticier (14c.), from Medieval Latin pasticium "pasty, composed of paste," from Late Latin pasta "paste, pastry cake" (see pasta).
patois (n.) Look up patois at Dictionary.com
"a provincial dialect," 1640s, from French patois "native or local speech" (13c.), of uncertain origin, probably from Old French patoier "handle clumsily, to paw," from pate "a paw," from Vulgar Latin *patta (see patten), from notion of clumsy manner of speaking. Compare French pataud "properly, a young dog with big paws, then an awkwardly built fellow" [Brachet]. Especially in reference to Jamaican English from 1934.
patootie (n.) Look up patootie at Dictionary.com
"sweetheart, pretty girl," colloquial American English, 1921, perhaps a corruption of potato (c.f. sweet potato). Sweet patootie is recorded from 1919 as a generic exclamation.
patri- Look up patri- at Dictionary.com
word-forming element used to make terms describing kinship of the father or the paternal line, from Latin patri-, comb. form of pater (see father (n.)).
patriarch (n.) Look up patriarch at Dictionary.com
late 12c., from Old French patriarche "one of the Old Testament fathers" (11c.) and directly from Late Latin patriarcha (Tertullian), from Greek patriarkhes "chief or head of a family," from patria "family, clan," from pater "father" (see father (n.)) + arkhein "to rule" (see archon). Also used as an honorific title of certain bishops in the early Church, notably those of Antioch, Alexandria, and Rome.