lamp-shade (n.) Look up lamp-shade at Dictionary.com
also lampshade, 1829, from lamp + shade (n.).
lamplight (n.) Look up lamplight at Dictionary.com
also lamp-light, late 14c., from lamp + light (n.).
lampoon (v.) Look up lampoon at Dictionary.com
1650s, from lampoon (n.), or else from French lamponner, from the Middle French noun. Related: Lampooned; lampooning.
lampoon (n.) Look up lampoon at Dictionary.com
"A personal satire; abuse; censure written not to reform but to vex" [Johnson], 1640s, from French lampon (17c.), of unknown origin, said by French etymologists to be from lampons "let us drink," popular refrain for scurrilous 17c. songs, from lamper "to drink, guzzle," a nasalized form of laper "to lap," from a Germanic source akin to lap (v.). Also see -oon.
lamprey (n.) Look up lamprey at Dictionary.com
c.1300 (c.1200 as a surname?), from Old French lamproie, from Medieval Latin lampreda, from Late Latin lampetra "lamprey," of uncertain origin, usually explained as literally "lick-rock," from Latin lambere "to lick" (see lap (v.1)) + petra "rock" (see petrous). The animals attach themselves to things with their sucker-like mouths.
Lancaster Look up Lancaster at Dictionary.com
Loncastre (1086) "Roman Fort on the River Lune," a Celtic river name probably meaning "healthy, pure." The Lancastrians in the War of the Roses took their name from their descent from John of Gaunt, Duke of Lancaster.
lance (n.) Look up lance at Dictionary.com
late 13c. (late 12c. as a surname), from Old French lance (12c.), from Latin lancea "light spear, Spanish lance" (Italian lancia, Spanish lanza), possibly of Celt-Iberian origin. The French word spread into Germanic (German Lanze, Middle Dutch lanse, Dutch lans, Danish landse). Lance corporal (1786) is from obsolete lancepesade "officer of lowest rank" (1570s), from Old Italian lancia spezzata "old soldier," literally "broken lance."
lance (v.) Look up lance at Dictionary.com
"to pierce with a lance," c.1300, from Old French lancier, from Late Latin lanceare "wield a lance; pierce with a lance," from lancea (see lance (n.)). The surgical sense (properly with reference to a lancet) is from late 15c. Related: Lanced; lancing.
Lancelot Look up Lancelot at Dictionary.com
masc. proper name, Old French, a double-diminutive of Frankish Lanzo, a hypocoristic name formed from some one of the Germanic names in Land-; compare Old English Landbeorht "land-bright," in Old French Lambert.
lancer (n.) Look up lancer at Dictionary.com
1580s, "soldier armed with a lance," from French lancier, from Old French lance (see lance (n.)).
lancet (n.) Look up lancet at Dictionary.com
late 14c., launcet, from Old French lancette "small lance" (12c.), diminutive of lance (see lance (n.)).
land (n.) Look up land at Dictionary.com
Old English land, lond, "ground, soil," also "definite portion of the earth's surface, home region of a person or a people, territory marked by political boundaries," from Proto-Germanic *landom (cognates: Old Norse, Old Frisian Dutch, Gothic land, German Land), from PIE *lendh- "land, heath" (cognates: Old Irish land, Middle Welsh llan "an open space," Welsh llan "enclosure, church," Breton lann "heath," source of French lande; Old Church Slavonic ledina "waste land, heath," Czech lada "fallow land").

Etymological evidence and Gothic use indicates the original sense was "a definite portion of the earth's surface owned by an individual or home of a nation." Meaning early extended to "solid surface of the earth," which had been the sense of the root of Modern English earth. Original sense of land in English is now mostly found under country. To take the lay of the land is a nautical expression. In the American English exclamation land's sakes (1846) land is a euphemism for Lord.
land (v.1) Look up land at Dictionary.com
"to bring to land," early 13c., from land (n.). Originally of ships; of fish, in the angling sense, from 1610s; hence figurative sense of "to obtain" (a job, etc.), first recorded 1854. Of aircraft, attested from 1916. Related: Landed; landing.
land (v.2) Look up land at Dictionary.com
"to make contact, to hit home" (of a blow, etc.), by 1881, perhaps altered from lend in a playful sense, or else an extension of land (v.1).
landau (n.) Look up landau at Dictionary.com
type of four-wheeled carriage, 1743, from Landau, town in Bavaria where they first were made. The first element is the common Germanic element found in English land (n.); the identity of the second is disputed. But Klein says the vehicle name is "in reality" Spanish lando "originally a light four-wheeled carriage drawn by mules," from Arabic al-andul.
landed (adj.) Look up landed at Dictionary.com
"possessed of land," late Old English gelandod; see land (n.).
landfall (n.) Look up landfall at Dictionary.com
"sighting of land," 1620s, also "the first land 'made' on a sea voyage;" from land (v.1) + fall (v.) in the sense of "happen." From the days of imprecise nautical navigation.
Land-fall. The first land discovered after a sea voyage. Thus a good land fall implies the land expected or desired; a bad landfall the reverse. [John Hamilton Moore, "The New Practical Navigator," London, 1814]
Of hurricanes, by 1932.
landfill (n.) Look up landfill at Dictionary.com
1916, from land (n.) + fill (n.). A euphemism for dump.
landform (n.) Look up landform at Dictionary.com
1893; see land (n.) + form (n.). Perhaps immediately from German Landform.
landing (n.) Look up landing at Dictionary.com
c.1600, place for boats; of stairs, first attested 1789; from present participle of land (v.1).
landlady (n.) Look up landlady at Dictionary.com
1520s, from land (n.) + lady.
landline (n.) Look up landline at Dictionary.com
also land-line, by 1861, originally a telegraph wire run over land (as opposed to under sea); from land (n.) + line (n.). In modern use (by 1965), a telephone line which uses wire or some other material (distinguished from a radio or cellular line).
landlocked (adj.) Look up landlocked at Dictionary.com
1620s, from land (n.) + past participle of lock (v.).
landlord (n.) Look up landlord at Dictionary.com
early 15c. in modern usage, from land (n.) + lord (n.).
landlubber (n.) Look up landlubber at Dictionary.com
also land-lubber, sailor's term of contempt for a landsman, c.1700, from land (n.) + lubber (q.v.).
landmark (n.) Look up landmark at Dictionary.com
Old English landmearc, from land (n.) + mearc (see mark (n.1)). Originally "object set up to mark the boundaries of a kingdom, estate, etc.;" general sense of "conspicuous object in a landscape" is from 1560s. Modern figurative sense of "event, etc., considered a high point in history" is from 1859.
landscape (n.) Look up landscape at Dictionary.com
c.1600, "painting representing natural scenery," from Dutch landschap, from Middle Dutch landscap "region," from land "land" (see land) + -scap "-ship, condition" (see -ship). Originally introduced as a painters' term. Old English had cognate landscipe, and compare similarly formed Old High German lantscaf, German Landschaft, Old Norse landskapr. Meaning "tract of land with its distinguishing characteristics" is from 1886.
landscape (v.) Look up landscape at Dictionary.com
"to lay out lawns, gardens, etc., plant trees for the sake of beautification," by 1916, from landscape (n). Related: Landscaped; landscaping.
landscaping (n.) Look up landscaping at Dictionary.com
by 1861; see landscape (v.).
The question, however, is, Can landscape-gardening (or short and sweet, landscaping) be taught? It, plainly, cannot. ["The Gardener's Monthly" July 1861]
Also of artists, "depiction as a landscape" (1868).
landslide (n.) Look up landslide at Dictionary.com
1856, American English, from land (n.) + slide (n.). Earlier was landslip, still preferred in Britain. Old English used eorðgebyrst in this sense; literally "earth-burst." In the political sense, landslide "lopsided electoral victory" is attested from 1888.
landslip (n.) Look up landslip at Dictionary.com
1670s, from land (n.) + slip (n.).
landwehr (n.) Look up landwehr at Dictionary.com
German military reserves, from German Landwehr, from Old High German lantweri, from lant "land" (see land (n.)) + weri "protection" (see weir).
lane (n.) Look up lane at Dictionary.com
Old English lane, lanu "narrow hedged-in road," common Germanic (cognates: Old Frisian lana, Middle Dutch lane, Dutch laan "lane," Old Norse lön "row of houses"), of unknown origin. As one track of a marked road, from 1921, American English.
lang syne Look up lang syne at Dictionary.com
c.1500, Scottish variant of long since; popularized in Burns' song, 1788.
language (n.) Look up language at Dictionary.com
late 13c., langage "words, what is said, conversation, talk," from Old French langage (12c.), from Vulgar Latin *linguaticum, from Latin lingua "tongue," also "speech, language" (see lingual). The form with -u- developed in Anglo-French. Meaning "a language" is from c.1300, also used in Middle English of dialects:
Mercii, þat beeþ men of myddel Engelond[,] vnderstondeþ bettre þe side langages, norþerne and souþerne, þan norþerne and souþerne vnderstondeþ eiþer oþer. [John of Trevisa, translation of Bartholomew de Glanville's "De proprietatibus rerum," 1398]



In oþir inglis was it drawin, And turnid ic haue it til ur awin Language of the norþin lede, Þat can na noþir inglis rede. ["Cursor Mundi," early 14c.]
Language barrier attested from 1933.
languedoc (n.) Look up languedoc at Dictionary.com
"language of medieval France south of the Loire," 1660s, from French langue d'oc "speech of the south of France," literally "the language of 'yes,' " from oc the word used for "yes" in southern France, from Latin hoc "this;" as opposed to langue d'oïl, from the way of saying "yes" in the north of France (Modern French oui); each from a different word in Latin phrase hoc ille (fecit) "this he (did)." The langue d'oïl has developed into standard Modern French.
languet (n.) Look up languet at Dictionary.com
early 15c., literally "little tongue," from French languette, diminutive of langue "tongue," from Latin lingua (see lingual).
languid (adj.) Look up languid at Dictionary.com
1590s, from Middle French languide (16c.) and directly from Latin languidus "faint, listless," from languere "be weak or faint," from PIE root *(s)leg- "to be slack" (see lax). Related: Languidly; languidness.
languish (v.) Look up languish at Dictionary.com
early 14c., "fail in strength, exhibit signs of approaching death," from languiss-, present participle stem of Old French languir "be listless, pine, grieve, fall ill," from Vulgar Latin *languire, from Latin languere "be weak or faint" (see lax). Weaker sense "be lovesick, grieve, lament, grow faint," is from mid-14c. Related: Languished; languishing.
languor (n.) Look up languor at Dictionary.com
c.1300, "disease, distress, mental suffering," from Old French langor "sickness, weakness" (Modern French langueur), from Latin languorem (nominative languor) "faintness, feebleness, lassitude," from languere "be weak or faint" (see lax). Sense shifted to "faintness, weariness" (1650s) and "habitual want of energy" (1825).
languorous (adj.) Look up languorous at Dictionary.com
late 15c., "mournful," from Old French langoros (11c.), from langor (see languor). Meaning "suggestive of languor" is from 1821. Related: Languorously; languorousness.
Lanier Look up Lanier at Dictionary.com
surname, from Old French lainier "wool-monger," from Latin lana "wool" (see wool).
lank (adj.) Look up lank at Dictionary.com
Old English hlanc "loose and empty, slender, flaccid," from Proto-Germanic *hlanka-, forming words meaning "to bend, turn," perhaps with a connecting notion of "flexible" (see flank (n.)). In Middle English, "Some examples may be long adj. with unvoicing of g" ["Middle English Dictionary"]
lanky (adj.) Look up lanky at Dictionary.com
1630s, "straight and flat," used of hair, from lank + -y (2); sense of "awkwardly tall and thin" is first recorded 1818. Related: Lankiness.
lanolin (n.) Look up lanolin at Dictionary.com
fatty matter extracted from sheep's wool," 1885, from German Lanolin, coined by German physician Mathias Eugenius Oscar Liebreich (1838-1908) from Latin lana "wool" (see wool) + oleum "oil, fat" (see oil (n.)) + chemical suffix -in (2).
lantern (n.) Look up lantern at Dictionary.com
mid-13c., from Old French lanterne "lamp, lantern, light" (12c.), from Latin lanterna "lantern, lamp, torch," altered (by influence of Latin lucerna "lamp") from Greek lampter "torch," from lampein "to shine" (see lamp). Variant lanthorn (16c.-19c.) was folk etymology based on the common use of horn as a translucent cover. Lantern-jaws "hollow, long cheeks" is from a resemblance noted since at least mid-14c.
lanthanum (n.) Look up lanthanum at Dictionary.com
metallic rare earth element, 1841, coined in Modern Latin by Swedish chemist and mineralogist Carl Gustav Mosander (1797-1858), who discovered it in 1839, from Greek lanthanein "to lie hidden, escape notice," from PIE root *ladh- "to be hidden" (see latent). So called because the element was "concealed" in rare minerals.
lanyard (n.) Look up lanyard at Dictionary.com
also laniard, alternative spelling (influenced by nautical yard (2) "long beam used to support a sail") of Middle English lainer, "thong for fastening parts of armor or clothing" (late 14c.), from Old French laniere "thong, lash," from lasniere, from lasne "strap, thong," apparently altered (by metathesis and influence of Old French las "lace") from nasliere, from Frankish *nastila or some other Germanic source, from Proto-Germanic *nastila- (cognates: Old High German, Old Saxon nestila "lace, strap, band," German nestel "string, lace, strap"), from PIE root *ned- "to knot."
Laocoon Look up Laocoon at Dictionary.com
Trojan priest of Apollo, from Latin Laocoon, from Greek Laukoun, from laos "people" (see lay (adj.)) + koeo "I mark, perceive."
Laocoön, n. A famous piece of antique sculpture representing a priest of that time and his two sons in the folds of two enormous serpents. The skill and diligence with which the old man and lads support the serpents and keep them up in their work have been justly regarded as one of the noblest artistic illustrations of the mastery of human intelligence over brute inertia. [Ambrose Bierce, "Devil's Dictionary," 1911]
Laodicean Look up Laodicean at Dictionary.com
"lukewarm in religion," 1560s, from Laodicea, Syrian city (modern Latakia) whose early Christians were chastised in the Bible for indifference to their religion [Rev. iii:14-16]. The city is said to be named for the 3c B.C.E. Syrian queen Laodice, wife of Antiochus II.