imagination (n.) Look up imagination at
"faculty of the mind which forms and manipulates images," mid-14c., ymaginacion, from Old French imaginacion "concept, mental picture; hallucination," from Latin imaginationem (nominative imaginatio) "imagination, a fancy," noun of action from past participle stem of imaginari (see imagine).
imaginative (adj.) Look up imaginative at
late 14c., ymaginatyf, from Old French imaginatif and directly from Medieval Latin imaginativus, from imaginat-, stem of Latin imaginari (see imagine). Related: Imaginatively; imaginativeness.
imagine (v.) Look up imagine at
mid-14c., "to form a mental image of," from Old French imaginer "sculpt, carve, paint; decorate, embellish" (13c.), from Latin imaginari "to form a mental picture to oneself, imagine" (also, in Late Latin imaginare "to form an image of, represent"), from imago (see image). Sense of "suppose" is first recorded late 14c. Related: Imagined; imagining.
imagism (n.) Look up imagism at
name of a movement in poetry that sought clarity of expression through use of precise visual images, "hard light, clear edges," coined 1912 by Ezra Pound; see image + -ism. Related: Imagist.
imago (n.) Look up imago at
1797, from Latin imago "image" (see image).
imam (n.) Look up imam at
1610s, from Arabic, literally "leader; one who precedes," from amma "to go before, precede."
imbalance (n.) Look up imbalance at
1895, from im- "not" + balance (n.).
imbecile (adj.) Look up imbecile at
1540s, imbecille "weak, feeble" (especially in reference to the body), from Middle French imbecile (15c.), from Latin imbecillus "weak, feeble" (see imbecility). Sense shifted to mental weakness from mid-18c. (compare frail, which in provincial English also could mean "mentally weak"). As a noun, "feeble-minded person," it is attested from 1802. Traditionally an adult with a mental age of roughly 6 to 9 (above an idiot but beneath a moron).
imbecilic (adj.) Look up imbecilic at
1875, from imbecile + -ic.
imbecility (n.) Look up imbecility at
early 15c., "physical weakness, feebleness (of a body part), impotence," from Middle French imbécillité and directly from Latin imbecillitatem (nominative imbecillitas) "weakness, feebleness," from imbecillus "weak, feeble," traditionally said to mean "unsupported" (quasi sine baculo), from assimilated form of in- "not, opposite of" (see in- (1)) + baculum "a stick" (see bacillus). "Weakness in mind" (as opposed to body) was a secondary sense in Latin but was not attested in English until 1620s.
imbibe (v.) Look up imbibe at
late 14c., from Old French imbiber, embiber "to soak into," from Latin imbibere "absorb, drink in, inhale," from assimilated form of in- "into, in, on, upon" (see in- (2)) + bibere "to drink," related to potare "to drink," from PIE *po(i)- "to drink" (see potion). Figurative sense of "mentally drink in" (knowledge, ideas, etc.) was the main one in classical Latin, first attested in English 1550s. Related: Imbibed; imbibing.
imbricate (v.) Look up imbricate at
1704 (implied in imbricated), from Latin imbricatus "covered with tiles," past participle of imbricare "to cover with rain tiles" (see imbrication). As an adjective from 1650s. Related: Imbricated; imbricating.
imbrication (n.) Look up imbrication at
1640s, from French imbrication, from Latin imbricare "to cover with tiles," from imbricem (nominative imbrex) "curved roof tile used to draw off rain," from imber (genitive imbris) "rain," from PIE *ombh-ro- "rain" (cognates: Sanskrit abhra "cloud, thunder-cloud, rainy weather," Greek ombros "rain"), from root *nebh- "moist, water" (see nebula).
imbroglio (n.) Look up imbroglio at
1750, from Italian imbroglio, from imbrogliare "confuse, tangle," from assimilated form of in- "into, in, on, upon" (see in- (2)) + brogliare "embroil," probably from Middle French brouiller "confuse" (see broil (v.2); also see embroil).
imbrue (v.) Look up imbrue at
early 15c., "to soak, steep;" mid-15c., "to stain, soil," from Old French embreuvere "to moisten," a metathesis of embeuvrer, from em- (see im-) + -bevrer, ultimately from Latin bibere "to drink" (see imbibe). Or perhaps from Old French embroue "soiled," ultimately from boue "mud, dirt."
imbue (v.) Look up imbue at
early 15c., "to keep wet; to soak, saturate;" also figuratively "to cause to absorb" (feelings, opinions, etc.), from Latin imbuere "moisten," of uncertain origin, perhaps from the same root as imbrication. Compare also Old French embu, past participle of emboivre, from Latin imbibere "drink in, soak in" (see imbibe), which might have influenced the English word. Related: Imbued; imbuing.
imburse (v.) Look up imburse at
1520s, from Medieval Latin imbursare, from assimilated form of in- "into, in, on, upon" (see in- (2)) + bursa "purse." Related: Imbursement.
imitable (adj.) Look up imitable at
from French imitable (16c.), from Latin imitabilis "that may be imitated," from imitari (see imitation). Related: Imitability.
imitate (v.) Look up imitate at
1530s, a back-formation from imitation or imitator, or else from Latin imitatus. Related: Imitated; imitating. An Old English word for this was æfterhyrigan.
imitation (n.) Look up imitation at
c. 1400, "emulation; act of copying," from Old French imitacion, from Latin imitationem (nominative imitatio) "a copying, imitation," from past participle stem of imitari "to copy, portray, imitate," from PIE *im-eto-, from root *aim- "copy" (cognates: Hittite himma- "imitation, substitute"). Meaning "an artificial likeness" is from c. 1600. As an adjective, from 1840.
imitative (adj.) Look up imitative at
1580s, probably from imitate + -ive; or else from Middle French imitatif, from Late Latin imitativus, from imitat-, stem of imitari.
imitator (n.) Look up imitator at
1520s; see imitate + -or. Perhaps from French imitateur (14c.).
immaculacy (n.) Look up immaculacy at
1799; see immaculate + -cy.
immaculate (adj.) Look up immaculate at
early 15c., "free from mental or moral pollution, pure," from a figurative use of Latin immaculatus "unstained," from assimilated form of in- "not, opposite of" (see in- (1)) + maculatus "spotted, defiled," past participle of maculare "to spot," from macula "spot, blemish." The literal sense of "spotlessly clean or neat" in English is first attested 1735. Immaculate Conception is late 15c., from Middle French conception immaculée (late 15c.); declared to be an article of faith in 1854.
immanence (n.) Look up immanence at
1816; see immanent + -ence. Immanency is from 1650s.
immanent (adj.) Look up immanent at
"indwelling, inherent," 1530s, via French, from Late Latin immanens, present participle of Latin immanere "to dwell in, remain in," from assimilated form of in- "into, in, on, upon" (see in- (2)) + manere "to dwell" (see manor). Contrasted with transcendent. Related: Immanently.
Immanuel Look up Immanuel at
masc. proper name; see Emmanuel.
immarcessible (adj.) Look up immarcessible at
"unfading, imperishable," 1540s, from Late Latin immarcessabilis from assimilated form of in- "not" (see in- (1)) + marcessare "to wither, pine away."
immaterial (adj.) Look up immaterial at
late 14c., "spiritual, incorporeal," from Medieval Latin immaterialis "not consisting of matter, spiritual," from assimilated form of in- "not, opposite of" (see in- (1)) + Late Latin materialis (see material). Secondary sense of "unimportant" is first recorded 1690s from material in its 16c. sense of "important." Related: Immaterially.
immature (adj.) Look up immature at
1540s, "untimely, premature," from Latin immaturus "untimely, unripe," from assimilated form of in- "not, opposite of" (see in- (1)) + maturus (see mature (v.)). In 16c., usually in reference to early death; modern sense of "not fully developed" first recorded 1640s. In reference to mentalities or behaviors not considered age-appropriate, from 1920.
immaturity (n.) Look up immaturity at
1530s, "untimeliness," from Latin immaturitatem (nominative immaturitas) "unripeness," from immaturus (see immature). Meaning "lack of maturity" attested from c. 1600.
immeasurable (adj.) Look up immeasurable at
mid-15c., from im- + measurable. It could alternate with immensurable (1530s), from French, from Late Latin immensurabilis, from assimilated form of in- "not" + mensurabilis "able to be measured," from mensurare "to measure." Related: Immeasurably.
immediacy (n.) Look up immediacy at
c. 1600, from immediate + -cy.
immediate (adj.) Look up immediate at
late 14c., "intervening, interposed;" early 15c., "with nothing interposed; direct," also with reference to time, from Old French immediat, from Late Latin immediatus "without anything between," from assimilated form of in- "not, opposite of" (see in- (1)) + mediatus, past participle of mediare "to halve," later, "be in the middle," from Latin medius "middle" (see medial (adj.)).
immediately (adv.) Look up immediately at
"without intervening time or space," early 15c., from immediate + -ly (2).
immemorable (adj.) Look up immemorable at
1550s, from Latin immemorabilis, from assimilated form of in- "not" (see in- (1)) + memorabilis (see memorable).
immemorial (adj.) Look up immemorial at
c. 1600, from French immémorial (16c.) "old beyond memory," from Medieval Latin immemorialis, from assimilated form of in- "not, opposite of" (see in- (1)) + memorialis (see memorial). Something immemorial is ancient beyond memory; something immemorable is not memorable.
immense (adj.) Look up immense at
early 15c., from Middle French immense (mid-14c.), from Latin immensus "immeasurable, boundless," from assimilated form of in- "not, opposite of" (see in- (1)) + mensus "measured," past participle of metiri (see measure).
For instance, a long while every thing was immense great and immense little, immense handsome and immense ugly. Miss Tippet from the cloisters, could not drink tea with Master Parchment at the White Conduit-house, unless it was an immense fine day, yet probably it might rain so immense, there was no going without a coach. ["Town and Country Magazine" (in "Annual Register" for 1772)]
immensely (adv.) Look up immensely at
1650s, from immense + -ly (2).
immensity (n.) Look up immensity at
mid-15c., from Middle French immensité (14c.) or directly from Latin immensitatem (nominative immensitas) "immeasurableness," noun of quality from immensus (see immense).
immerge (v.) Look up immerge at
1620s, "immerse, plunge" (rare), from Latin immergere "to dip, plunge" (see immersion). Related: Immerged; immerging.
immerse (v.) Look up immerse at
early 15c. (implied in immersed), from Latin immersus, past participle of immergere "to plunge in, dip into" (see immersion). Related: Immersed; immersing; immersive.
immersion (n.) Look up immersion at
mid-15c., from Late Latin immersionem (nominative immersio), noun of action from past participle stem of immergere, from assimilated form of in- "into, in, on, upon" (see in- (2)) + Latin mergere "plunge, dip" (see merge). Meaning "absorption in some interest or situation" is from 1640s. As a method of teaching a foreign language, it is from 1965, trademarked by the Berlitz company.
immigrant (n.) Look up immigrant at
"one who immigrates," 1792, in an American context, from French immigrant, from Latin immigrantem (nominative immigrans), present participle of immigrare (see immigrate). Emigrant is older. As an adjective from 1805.
immigrate (v.) Look up immigrate at
1620s, from Latin immigratum, past participle of imigrare "to remove, go into, move in," from assimilated form of in- "into, in, on, upon" (see in- (2)) + migrare "to move" (see migration). Related: Immigrated; immigrating.
immigration (n.) Look up immigration at
1650s, from immigrate + -ion. As short for "immigration authorities," from 1966.
imminence (n.) Look up imminence at
c. 1600, from Late Latin imminentia, from Latin imminentem (see imminent).
imminent (adj.) Look up imminent at
1520s, from Middle French imminent (14c.) and directly from Latin imminentem (nominative imminens), present participle of imminere "to overhang; impend, be near, be at hand," from assimilated form of in- "into, in, on, upon" (see in- (2)) + minere "jut out," related to mons "hill" (see mount (n.)). Related: Imminently.
immiscible (adj.) Look up immiscible at
1670s, from im- + miscible.
immitigable (adj.) Look up immitigable at
1570s, from Latin immitigabilis, from assimilated form of in- "not" (see in- (1) + mitigabilis, from past participle stem of mitigare "make mild or gentle" (see mitigate). Related: Immitigably.