inbreeding (n.) Look up inbreeding at Dictionary.com
c.1842, from in + breeding.
Inc. Look up Inc. at Dictionary.com
U.S. abbreviation of Incorporated in company names (equivalent of British Ltd.), first attested 1904.
Inca (n.) Look up Inca at Dictionary.com
1590s, from Spanish Inga (1520s), from Quechea Inca, literally "lord, king." Technically, only of the high Inca, but it was used widely for "man of royal blood."
incalculable (adj.) Look up incalculable at Dictionary.com
1795, from in- (1) "not, opposite of" + calculable (see calculate). Related: Incalculably; incalculability.
incandescence (n.) Look up incandescence at Dictionary.com
1650s, figurative, "state of being 'inflamed,'" from incandescent + -ence. Literal use from 1794.
incandescent (adj.) Look up incandescent at Dictionary.com
1794, from French incandescent or directly from Latin incandescentem (nominative incandescens), present participle of incandescere "become warm, glow, kindle," from in- "within" (see in- (2)) + candescere "begin to glow, become white," inceptive of candere "to glow, to shine" (see candle).
incantation (n.) Look up incantation at Dictionary.com
late 14c., from Old French incantacion "spell, exorcism" (13c.), from Latin incantationem (nominative incantatio) "art of enchanting," noun of action from past participle stem of incantare "bewitch, charm," literally "sing spells" (see enchantment).
incapable (adj.) Look up incapable at Dictionary.com
1590s, from Middle French incapable and directly from Medieval Latin incapabilis, from in- "not" (see in- (1)) + capabilis (see capable). Related: Incapably; incapability.
incapacitate (v.) Look up incapacitate at Dictionary.com
1650s, from incapacity + -ate. Related: Incapacitated; incapacitating.
incapacitation (n.) Look up incapacitation at Dictionary.com
1741, noun of action from incapacitate.
incapacity (n.) Look up incapacity at Dictionary.com
1610s, from French incapacité (16c.), from Medieval Latin incapacitatem (nominative incapacitas), from Late Latin incapax (genitive incapacis) "incapable," from in- "not" (see in- (1)) + Latin capax "capable," literally "able to hold much," from capere "to take" (see capable). Often used 17c. as a legal term referring to inability to take, receive, or deal with in some way.
incarcerate (v.) Look up incarcerate at Dictionary.com
1550s, a back-formation from incarceration, or else from Medieval Latin incarceratus, past participle of incarcerare "to imprison" (see incarceration). Related: Incarcerated; incarcerating.
incarceration (n.) Look up incarceration at Dictionary.com
early 15c., "retention of pus," from Medieval Latin incarcerationem (nominative incarceratio), noun of action from past participle stem of incarcerare "to imprison," from in- "in" (see in- (2)) + carcer "prison, an enclosed space," from Proto-Italic *kar-kr(o)-, of uncertain origin.
It seems best to connect carcer with other IE words for 'circle, round object', such as Latin. curvus, Gr. κιρκος 'ring', OIc. hringr, although not all of these have a good IE etymology. The reduplication in Latin carcer could be iconic; thus, the original meaning would have been 'enclosure'. [de Vaan]
incarnadine Look up incarnadine at Dictionary.com
1590s (adj.) "flesh-colored," from French incarnadine, from dialectal Italian incarnadino "flesh-color," from Late Latin incarnatio (see incarnation). The verb properly would mean "to make flesh colored," but the modern meaning "make red," and the entire survival of the verb, is traceable to "Macbeth" II ii. (1605). Its direct root might be the noun incarnadine "blood-red; flesh-color," though this is not attested until 1620s.
incarnate (adj.) Look up incarnate at Dictionary.com
late 14c., from Late Latin incarnatus "made flesh," a common word among early Christian writers, past participle of Latin incarnare "to make flesh" (see incarnation).
incarnate (v.) Look up incarnate at Dictionary.com
1530s, a back-formation from incarnation, or else from Latin incarnatus, past participle of incarnare (see incarnation). Related: Incarnated; incarnating.
incarnation (n.) Look up incarnation at Dictionary.com
c.1300, "embodiment of God in the person of Christ," from Old French incarnacion (12c.), from Late Latin incarnationem (nominative incarnatio), "act of being made flesh" (used by Church writers especially of God in Christ), noun of action from past participle stem of Latin incarnare "to make flesh," from in- "in" (see in- (2)) + caro (genitive carnis) "flesh" (see carnage).
incautious (adj.) Look up incautious at Dictionary.com
1703, from in- (1) + cautious. Related: Incautiously.
incendiarism (n.) Look up incendiarism at Dictionary.com
1670s, figurative; 1837, literal; see incendiary + -ism.
incendiary Look up incendiary at Dictionary.com
c.1400 as a noun, "person who sets malicious fires;" mid-15c. as an adjective, "capable of being used to set fires," from Latin incendiarius "causing a fire," from incendium "conflagration," from incendere "set on fire," figuratively, "incite, rouse, enrage," from in- "into, in, on, upon" (see in- (2)) + *candere "to set alight, cause to glow," related to candere "to shine" (see candle). Figurative sense of "enflaming passions" (adj.) is from 1610s. Military use, of bombs, shells, etc., attested from 1871. The obsolete verb incend is attested from c.1500.
incense (n.) Look up incense at Dictionary.com
late 13c., from Old French encens "sweet-smelling substance," from Late Latin incensum (nominative incensus) "burnt incense," literally "something burnt," neuter past participle of Latin incendere "set on fire" (see incendiary).
incense (v.1) Look up incense at Dictionary.com
"make angry," early 15c., from Middle French incenser, from Latin incensare, frequentative of Latin incendere "set on fire" (see incendiary). A figurative use of the word used literally in incense (n.). Related: Incensed.
incense (v.2) Look up incense at Dictionary.com
"to offer incense, perfume with incense," c.1300, from Old French encenser, from encens (see incense (n.)).
incent (v.) Look up incent at Dictionary.com
by 1992, U.S. government-speak, back-formation from incentive. Related: Incented; incenting.
incentive (n.) Look up incentive at Dictionary.com
early 15c., from Late Latin incentivum, noun use of neuter of Latin adjective incentivus "setting the tune" (in Late Latin "inciting"), from past participle stem of incinere "strike up," from in- "in, into" (see in- (2)) + canere "sing" (see chant (v.)). Sense influenced by association with incendere "to kindle." The adjective use, in reference to a system of rewards meant to encourage harder work, first attested 1943 in jargon of the U.S. war economy; as a noun, in this sense, from 1948.
incentivize (v.) Look up incentivize at Dictionary.com
by 1970, from incentive + -ize. Related: Incentivized; incentivizing.
incept (v.) Look up incept at Dictionary.com
1560s, from Latin inceptus, past participle of incipere "to begin" (see inception). Related: Incepted.
inception (n.) Look up inception at Dictionary.com
early 15c., "beginning, starting," from Middle French incepcion and directly from Latin inceptionem (nominative inceptio) "a beginning, undertaking," noun of action from past participle stem of incipere "begin, take in hand," from in- "in, on" (see in- (2)) + cipere comb. form of capere "take, seize" (see capable).
inceptive (adj.) Look up inceptive at Dictionary.com
1650s, from French inceptif (16c.), from Latin incept-, past participle stem of incipere "to begin" (see inception).
incertitude (n.) Look up incertitude at Dictionary.com
mid-15c., "variability," from Middle French incertitude (14c.), from Late Latin incertitudinem (nominative incertitudo); see certitude. Incertain "uncertain" and incertainty "uncertainty" also were living words in Middle English.
incessancy (n.) Look up incessancy at Dictionary.com
1610s; see incessant + -cy.
incessant (adj.) Look up incessant at Dictionary.com
mid-15c., from Old French incessant (mid-14c.), from Late Latin incessantem (nominative incessans) "unceasing," from Latin in- "not" (see in- (1)) + cessantem (nominative cessans), present participle of cessare "cease" (see cease). Related: Incessantly (early 15c.).
incest (n.) Look up incest at Dictionary.com
c.1200, "the crime of sexual intercourse between near kindred," from Old French inceste and directly from Latin incestum "unchastity, impious unchastity," also specifically "sex between close relatives," noun use of neuter adjective incestus "unchaste, impure," from in- "not" (see in- (1)) + castus "pure" (see caste). In early use also in reference to sexual relations or marriage with one under a vow of chastity (sometimes distinguished as spiritual incest). Old English had sibleger "incest," literally "kin-lying."
incestuous (adj.) Look up incestuous at Dictionary.com
1530s, from Latin incestuosus "incestuous," from incestus "unchaste" (see incest). Figurative use is from 1744. Related: Incestuously; incestuousness.
inch (n.1) Look up inch at Dictionary.com
"linear measure, one-twelfth of a foot," late Old English ynce, Middle English unche (current spelling c.1300), from Latin uncia "a twelfth part," from root of unus "one" (see one). An early borrowing from Latin, not found in any other Germanic language. Transferred and figurative sense of "a very small amount" is attested from mid-14c. For phrase give him an inch ... see ell.
inch (n.2) Look up inch at Dictionary.com
"small Scottish island," early 15c., from Gaelic innis (genitive innse) "island, land by a river," from Celtic *inissi (cognates: Old Irish inis, Welsh ynys, Breton enez).
inch (v.) Look up inch at Dictionary.com
"move little by little," 1590s, from inch (n.1). Related: Inched; inching.
inchoate (adj.) Look up inchoate at Dictionary.com
1530s, from Latin inchoatus, past participle of inchoare, alteration of incohare "to begin," originally "to hitch up," from in- "on" (see in- (2)) + cohum "strap fastened to the oxen's yoke." Related: Inchoative.
inchworm (n.) Look up inchworm at Dictionary.com
1844, American English, from inch (v.) + worm (n.). Other old names for it included loaper caterpiller and surveyor, all from its mode of progress.
incidence (n.) Look up incidence at Dictionary.com
early 15c., "incidental matter," from Middle French incidence (15c.), from Late Latin incidentia (see incident (n.)). Meaning "act of coming into contact with" is from 1650s; sense in physics is from 1620s.
incident (n.) Look up incident at Dictionary.com
early 15c., "something which occurs casually in connection with something else," from Middle French incident and directly from Latin incidentem (nominative incidens), present participle of incidere "happen, befall," from in- "on" + -cidere, comb. form of cadere "to fall" (see case (n.1)). Sense of "an occurrence viewed as a separate circumstance" is from mid-15c. Meaning "event that might trigger a crisis or political unrest" first attested 1913.
incident (adj.) Look up incident at Dictionary.com
"conducive (to), contributing (to)," early 15c., from Middle French incident (adj.) or directly from Latin incidens, present participle of incidere (see incident (n.)).
incidental (adj.) Look up incidental at Dictionary.com
"casual, occasional," 1610s, from Medieval Latin incidentalis, from incidens (see incident (n.)). Incidentals (n.) "'occasional' expenses, etc.," is attested by 1707.
incidentally (adv.) Look up incidentally at Dictionary.com
1520s, "by the way, casually;" see incidental + -ly (2). Sense of "as a new but related point" attested by 1925.
incinerate (v.) Look up incinerate at Dictionary.com
1550s, from Medieval Latin incineratus "reduced to ashes," pp. of incinerare, from Latin in- "into" (see in- (2)) + cinis (genitive cineris) "ashes," from PIE root *keni- "dust, ashes" (cognates: Greek konis "dust"). Used earlier in English as a past participle adjective meaning "reduced to ashes" (early 15c.). Related: Incinerated; incinerating.
incineration (n.) Look up incineration at Dictionary.com
1520s, from Middle French incinération (14c.), from Medieval Latin incinerationem (nominative incineratio), noun of action from past participle stem of incinerare (see incinerate).
incinerator (n.) Look up incinerator at Dictionary.com
1883, American English, originally in the terminology of cremation, from incinerate + Latinate agent noun suffix -or. Meaning "device for waste disposal by burning" is from 1889.
incipience (n.) Look up incipience at Dictionary.com
1864; see incipient + -ence. Incipiency is from 1817.
incipient (adj.) Look up incipient at Dictionary.com
1660s, from Latin incipientem (nominative incipiens), present participle of incipere "begin, take up," from in- "into, in, on, upon" (see in- (2)) + -cipere, comb. form of capere "to take" (see capable).
incipit Look up incipit at Dictionary.com
opening word of a Latin book or manuscript, Latin, literally "(here) begins," third person singular present indicative of incipere (see incipient).