hulk (v.) Look up hulk at Dictionary.com
"to be clumsy, unwieldy, lazy," 1789, from hulk (n.). Related: Hulked; hulking.
hulking (adj.) Look up hulking at Dictionary.com
"big, clumsy," 1690s (through 18c. usually with fellow), from hulk (n.).
hull (n.1) Look up hull at Dictionary.com
"seed covering," from Old English hulu "husk, pod," from Proto-Germanic *hulus "to cover" (cognates: Old High German hulla, hulsa; German Hülle, Hülse, Dutch huls). Figurative use by 1831.
hull (n.2) Look up hull at Dictionary.com
"body of a ship," 1550s, perhaps from hull (n.1) on fancied resemblance of ship keels to open peapods (compare Latin carina "keel of a ship," originally "shell of a nut;" Greek phaselus "light passenger ship, yacht," literally "bean pod;" French coque "hull of a ship; shell of a walnut or egg"). Alternative etymology is from Middle English hoole "ship's keel" (mid-15c.), from the same source as hold (n.).
hull (v.) Look up hull at Dictionary.com
"to remove the husk of," early 15c., from hull (n.1). Related: Hulled, which can mean both "having a particular kind of hull" and "stripped of the hull."
hullabaloo (n.) Look up hullabaloo at Dictionary.com
1762, hollo-ballo "uproar," chiefly in northern England and Scottish, perhaps a rhyming reduplication of hollo (see hello).
hullo Look up hullo at Dictionary.com
call to attract attention, by 1828; see hello.
hum (v.) Look up hum at Dictionary.com
late 14c., hommen "make a murmuring sound to cover embarrassment," later hummen "to buzz, drone" (early 15c.), probably of imitative origin. Sense of "sing with closed lips" is first attested late 15c.; that of "be busy and active" is 1884, perhaps on analogy of a beehive. Related: Hummed; humming. Humming-bird (1630s) so called from sound made by the rapid vibration of its wings.
There is a curious bird to see to, called a humming bird, no bigger then a great Beetle. [Thomas Morton, "New English Canaan," 1637]
hum (n.) Look up hum at Dictionary.com
mid-15c., from hum (v.).
hum-drum (adj.) Look up hum-drum at Dictionary.com
also humdrum, "routine, monotonous," 1550s, probably a reduplication of hum.
human (adj.) Look up human at Dictionary.com
mid-15c., humain, humaigne, from Old French humain, umain (adj.) "of or belonging to man" (12c.), from Latin humanus "of man, human," also "humane, philanthropic, kind, gentle, polite; learned, refined, civilized," probably related to homo (genitive hominis) "man" (see homunculus) and to humus "earth," on notion of "earthly beings," as opposed to the gods (compare Hebrew adam "man," from adamah "ground"). Cognate with Old Lithuanian zmuo (accusative zmuni) "man, male person."

As a noun, from 1530s. Its Old English cognate guma (from Proto-Germanic *guman-) survives only in disguise in bridegroom. Related: Humanness. Human rights attested by 1680s; human being by 1690s. Human relations is from 1916; human resources attested by 1907, American English, apparently originally among social Christians and drawn from natural resources.
humane (adj.) Look up humane at Dictionary.com
mid-15c., variant of human (compare german/germane, urban/urbane), used interchangeably with it until early 18c., by which time it had become a distinct word with sense of "having qualities befitting human beings." But inhuman still can be the opposite of humane. The Royal Humane Society (founded 1774) was originally to rescue drowning persons. Such societies had turned to animal care by late 19c.
humanely Look up humanely at Dictionary.com
1590s, from humane + -ly (2).
humanism (n.) Look up humanism at Dictionary.com
along with humanist used in a variety of philosophical and theological senses 16c.-18c., especially ones imitating Latin humanitas "education befitting a cultivated man." See human + -ism. Main modern sense in reference to revival of interest in the Classics traces to c. 1860; as a pragmatic system of thought, defined 1907 by co-founder F.C.S. Schiller as: "The perception that the philosophical problem concerns human beings striving to comprehend a world of human experience by the resources of human minds."
humanist (n.) Look up humanist at Dictionary.com
1580s, "student of the classical humanities," from Middle French humaniste (16c.), formed on model of Italian umanista "student of human affairs or human nature," coined by Italian poet Lodovicio Ariosto (1474-1533), from Latin humanus “human” (see human; also see humanism). Philosophical sense is from 1903.
humanistic Look up humanistic at Dictionary.com
1845 (humanistical is from 1716), in reference to Renaissance or classical humanism; from humanist + -ic. From 1904 in reference to a modern philosophy that concerns itself with the interests of the human race.
humanitarian (n.) Look up humanitarian at Dictionary.com
1794 (n.) in the theological sense "one who affirms the humanity of Christ but denies his pre-existence and divinity," from humanity + suffix from unitarian, etc.; see humanism. Meaning "philanthropist, one who advocates or practices human action to solve social problems" is from 1842, originally disparaging, with a suggestion of excess. As an adjective, by 1834.
humanitarianism (n.) Look up humanitarianism at Dictionary.com
by 1794 as a Christian theological position, from humanitarian + -ism. Sense related to ethical benevolence attested by 1838.
humanities Look up humanities at Dictionary.com
1702; plural of humanity, which was used in English from late 15c. in a sense "class of studies concerned with human culture" (opposed variously at different times to divinity or sciences). Latin literae humaniores, they were those branches of literature (ancient classics, rhetoric, poetry) which tended to humanize or refine.
humanity (n.) Look up humanity at Dictionary.com
late 14c., "kindness, graciousness," from Old French humanité, umanité "human nature; humankind, life on earth; pity," from Latin humanitatem (nominative humanitas) "human nature; philanthropy, kindness; good breeding, refinement; the human race, mankind," from humanus (see human). Sense of "human nature, human form" is c. 1400; that of "human race" first recorded mid-15c.
humanize (v.) Look up humanize at Dictionary.com
c. 1600, from human + -ize. Related: Humanized; humanizing.
humankind (n.) Look up humankind at Dictionary.com
1640s, properly two words, from human + kind (n.).
humanly (adv.) Look up humanly at Dictionary.com
c. 1500, from human + -ly (2).
humanoid Look up humanoid at Dictionary.com
1912 (adj.), an anthropological hybrid from human + -oid. As a noun, from 1925. Earlier (1906) brand name of a type of cow's milk altered to be closer to human milk intended as food for infants.
humble (adj.) Look up humble at Dictionary.com
mid-13c., from Old French humble, earlier humele, from Latin humilis "lowly, humble," literally "on the ground," from humus "earth." Senses of "not self-asserting" and "of low birth or rank" were both in Middle English Related: Humbly; humbleness.
Don't be so humble; you're not that great. [Golda Meir]
To eat humble pie (1830) is from umble pie (1640s), pie made from umbles "edible inner parts of an animal" (especially deer), considered a low-class food. The similar sense of similar-sounding words (the "h" of humble was not pronounced then) converged in the pun. Umbles, meanwhile, is Middle English numbles "offal" (with loss of n- through assimilation into preceding article).
humble (v.) Look up humble at Dictionary.com
late 14c. in the intransitive sense of "to render oneself humble;" late 15c. in the transitive sense of "to lower (someone) in dignity;" see humble (adj.). Related: Humbled; humbling.
humbug (n.) Look up humbug at Dictionary.com
1751, student slang, "trick, jest, hoax, deception," also as a verb, of unknown origin. A vogue word of the early 1750s; its origin was a subject of much whimsical speculation even then.
humdinger (n.) Look up humdinger at Dictionary.com
1905, American English, originally used of beautiful women; probably from dinger, early 19c. slang word for anything superlative; also see hummer.
humeral (adj.) Look up humeral at Dictionary.com
1610s; see humerus + -al (1).
humerus (n.) Look up humerus at Dictionary.com
1706, "bone of the upper arm," originally (14c.) "shoulder," a misspelled borrowing of Latin umerus "shoulder," from PIE *om(e)so- (cognates: Sanskrit amsah, Greek omos, Old Norse ass, Gothic ams "shoulder").
humid (adj.) Look up humid at Dictionary.com
early 15c., from Old French humide or directly from Latin humidus "moist, wet," variant (probably by influence of humus "earth") of umidus, from umere "be moist," from PIE *wegw- "wet."
humidifier (n.) Look up humidifier at Dictionary.com
1884, agent noun from humidify.
humidify (v.) Look up humidify at Dictionary.com
1884; see humid + -fy. Related: Humidified; humidifying. Earlier was humify (1650s).
humidity (n.) Look up humidity at Dictionary.com
late 14c., from Old French humidité, from Latin humiditatem (nominative humiditas), from humidus (see humid).
humidor (n.) Look up humidor at Dictionary.com
1903, from humid on model of cuspidor.
humiliate (v.) Look up humiliate at Dictionary.com
1530s, perhaps a back-formation from humiliation. Related: Humiliated; humiliating; humiliatingly.
humiliation (n.) Look up humiliation at Dictionary.com
late 14c., from Late Latin humiliationem (nominative humiliatio) "humbling, humiliation," noun of action from past participle stem of humiliare "to humble," from humilis "humble" (see humble).
humility (n.) Look up humility at Dictionary.com
early 14c., from Old French umelite "humility, modesty, sweetness," from Latin humilitatem (nominative humilitas) "lowness, insignificance," in Church Latin "meekness," from humilis "humble" (see humble). In the Mercian hymns, Latin humilitatem is glossed by Old English eaðmodnisse.
hummer (n.) Look up hummer at Dictionary.com
c. 1600, agent noun from hum (v.). Meaning "energetic person or thing" is 1680s; that of "excellent person or thing" is slang from 1907. As short for Humvee, attested from 1983.
hummock (n.) Look up hummock at Dictionary.com
"knoll, hillock," 1550s, originally nautical, "conical small hill on a seacoast," of obscure origin, though second element is diminutive suffix -ock. In Florida, where the local form is hammock, it means a clump of hardwood trees on a knoll in a swamp or on a key.
hummus (n.) Look up hummus at Dictionary.com
1955, from Turkish humus "mashed chick peas."
humongous (adj.) Look up humongous at Dictionary.com
also humungous, by 1972, American English, apparently a fanciful coinage from huge and monstrous.
humor (n.) Look up humor at Dictionary.com
mid-14c., "fluid or juice of an animal or plant," from Old North French humour (Old French humor; Modern French humeur), from Latin umor "body fluid" (also humor, by false association with humus "earth"); related to umere "be wet, moist," and to uvescere "become wet," from PIE *wegw- "wet."

In ancient and medieval physiology, "any of the four body fluids" (blood, phlegm, choler, and melancholy or black bile) whose relative proportions were thought to determine state of mind. This led to a sense of "mood, temporary state of mind" (first recorded 1520s); the sense of "amusing quality, funniness" is first recorded 1680s, probably via sense of "whim, caprice" (1560s), which also produced the verb sense of "indulge," first attested 1580s. "The pronunciation of the initial h is only of recent date, and is sometimes omitted ...." [OED] For types of humor, see the useful table below, from H.W. Fowler ["Modern English Usage," 1926].

device HUMOR WIT SATIRE SARCASM INVECTIVE IRONY CYNICISM SARDONIC
motive/aim discovery throwing light amendment inflicting pain discredit exclusiveness self-justification self-relief
province human nature words & ideas morals & manners faults & foibles misconduct statement of facts morals adversity
method/means observation surprise accentuation inversion direct statement mystification exposure of nakedness pessimism
audience the sympathetic the intelligent the self-satisfied victim & bystander the public an inner circle the respectable the self
humor (v.) Look up humor at Dictionary.com
1580s; see humor (n.). Related: Humored; humoring.
humoral (adj.) Look up humoral at Dictionary.com
"pertaining to the humors of the body," 1520s, from Middle French humoral (14c.), from Latin humor (see humor (n.)).
humorist (n.) Look up humorist at Dictionary.com
1590s, from humor (n.) + -ist. Perhaps on model of Middle French humoriste.
humorous (adj.) Look up humorous at Dictionary.com
early 15c., "relating to the body humors," a native formation from humor, or else from Middle French humoreux "damp," from Old French humor (see humor (n.)). The meaning "funny" dates from 1705 in English. Related: Humorously; humorousness.
humour Look up humour at Dictionary.com
chiefly British English spelling of humor; see -or. Related: Humourous; humourist.
hump (n.) Look up hump at Dictionary.com
1680s (in hump-backed), from Dutch homp "lump," from Middle Low German hump "bump," from Proto-Germanic *hump-, from PIE *kemb- "to bend, turn, change, exchange." Replaced, or perhaps influenced by, crump, from Old English crump. A meaning attested from 1901 is "mound in a railway yard over which cars must be pushed," which may be behind the figurative sense of "critical point of an undertaking" (1914). Humpback whale is from 1725.
hump (v.) Look up hump at Dictionary.com
"to do the sex act with," attested from 1785, but the source of this indicates it is an older word. Meaning "to raise into a hump" is from 1840. Related: Humped; humping.