glob (n.)
1900, perhaps suggested by blob, gob, etc.
global (adj.)
1670s, "spherical," from globe + -al (1). Meaning "worldwide, universal" is from 1892, from French. Global village first attested 1960, popularized, if not coined, by Canadian educator Marshall McLuhan (1911-1980).
Postliterate man's electronic media contract the world to a village or tribe where everything happens to everyone at the same time: everyone knows about, and therefore participates in, everything that is happening the minute it happens. Television gives this quality of simultaneity to events in the global village. [Carpenter & McLuhan, "Explorations in Communication," 1960]
global warming (n.)
by 1983 as the name for a condition of overall rising temperatures and attendant consequences as a result of human activity. Originally theoretical, popularized as a reality from 1989.
globalisation (n.)
chiefly British English spelling of globalization; for spelling, see -ize.
globalism (n.)
1961, from global + -ism.
globalization (n.)
1961, from globalize, which is attested at least from 1953 in various senses; the main modern one, with reference to global economic systems, emerged 1959.
globalize (v.)
1953, see globalization. Related: Globalized; globalizing.
globally (adv.)
by 1910, from global + -ly (2).
globate (adj.)
"spherical," 1847, from Latin globatus, past participle of globare "make into a globe," from globus (see globe).
globe (n.)
mid-15c., "sphere," from Middle French globe (14c.) and directly from Latin globus "round mass, sphere, ball," also, of men, "a throng, crowd, body, mass," related to gleba "clod, soil, land" (see glebe). Sense of "planet earth," or a three-dimensional map of it first attested 1550s.
globetrotter (n.)
"world traveller," 1871, from globe + agent noun from trot (v.). As a verb, globetrot is recorded from 1883.
globose (adj.)
"spherical," early 15c., "large and formless," from Latin globosus "round as a ball," from globus (see globe).
globular (adj.)
1650s, from French globulaire, from Latin globus (see globe).
globule (n.)
1660s, from French globule, from Latin globulus, diminutive of globus "globe" (see globe).
glockenspiel (n.)
1825, from German Glockenspiel, literally "play of bells," from Glocke "bell" (see clock) + Spiel "a play."
glom (v.)
1907, glahm "grab, snatch, steal," American English underworld slang, from Scottish glaum (1715), apparently from Gaelic glam "to handle awkwardly, grab voraciously, devour." Sense of "look at, watch" (1945) apparently is derived from the same source. Related: Glommed; glomming.
glomeration (n.)
"accumulation; ball," 1620s, from Latin glomerationem (nominative glomeratio), noun of action from past participle stem of glomerare "to make into a ball," from glomus "ball of yarn," from PIE root *glem-.
gloom
c.1300 as a verb, "to look sullen or displeased," perhaps from Scandinavian (compare Norwegian dialectal glome "to stare somberly"). Not considered to be related to Old English glom "twilight," but perhaps to Middle Low German glum "turbid," Dutch gluren "to leer." The noun is 1590s in Scottish, "sullen look," from the verb. Sense of "darkness, obscurity" is first recorded 1629 in Milton's poetry; that of "melancholy" is 1744 (gloomy in this sense is attested from 1580s).
gloomy (adj.)
1580s, probably from gloom even though that word is not attested as early as this one is. Shakespeare used it of woods, Marlowe of persons. Gloomy Gus used in a general sense of "sullen person" since 1940s, from a comic strip character of that name first recorded 1904. Related: Gloomily; gloominess.
glop (n.)
1943, imitative of the sound of something viscous and unappetizing hitting a dinner plate.
Gloria
early 13c., name of a song of praise, from Medieval Latin gloria in "Gloria Patri," hymn praising god (and similar hymns), from Latin gloria "glory" (see glory).
glorification (n.)
mid-15c. as a term in alchemy, "action of refining; state of being refined," from Late Latin glorificationem (nominative glorificatio), noun of action from past participle stem of glorificare (see glorify). From c.1500 in theology; general sense by mid-19c.
glorified (adj.)
mid-14c., "invested with glory," past participle adjective from glorify. Weakened sense of "transformed into something better" is from 1821.
glorify (v.)
mid-14c., from Old French glorifier, from Late Latin glorificare "to glorify," from Latin gloria (see glory) + -ficare, from facere "to make, do" (see factitious). Related: Glorified; glorifying.
glorious (adj.)
late 13c., from Anglo-French glorious, Old French glorieus (12c., Modern French glorieux), from Latin gloriosus "full of glory, famous," from gloria (see glory). In 14c.-17c. it also could mean "boastful, vainglorious." Related: Gloriously.
glory (n.)
c.1200, gloire "the splendor of God or Christ; praise offered to God, worship," from Old French glorie (11c., Modern French gloire), from Latin gloria "fame, renown, great praise or honor," of uncertain origin.

Greek doxa "expectation" (Homer), later "opinion, fame," and ultimately "glory," was used in Biblical writing to translate a Hebrew word which had a sense of "brightness, splendor, magnificence, majesty," and this subsequently was translated as Latin gloria, which has colored that word's meaning in most European tongues. Wuldor was an Old English word used in this sense. Sense of "magnificence" is c.1300 in English. Meaning "worldly honor, fame, renown" of "the kingdom of Heaven," and of "one who is a source of glory" are from mid-14c. Latin also had gloriola "a little fame." Glory days was in use by 1970.
glory (v.)
mid-14c., "rejoice," from Old French gloriier and directly from Latin gloriari "to boast, vaunt, brag, pride oneself," from gloria (see glory). Related: Gloried; glorying.
glory hole (n.)
"a drawer or place where things are heaped together in a disorderly manner," 1825, the first element probably a variant of Scottish glaur "to make muddy" (mid-15c.), perhaps from Old Norse leir "mud." Sexual (originally homosexual) sense from 1940s.
gloss (n.1)
"luster," 1530s, from Scandinavian (compare Icelandic glossi "flame," related to glossa "to flame"), or obsolete Dutch gloos "a glowing," from Middle High German glos; probably ultimately from the same source as Old English glowan (see glow (v.)).
gloss (n.2)
"word inserted as an explanation," 1540s (earlier gloze, c.1300), from Latin glossa "obsolete or foreign word," one that requires explanation; hence also "explanation, note," from Greek glossa (Ionic), glotta (Attic) "obscure word, language," also "mouthpiece," literally "tongue," from PIE *glogh- "thorn, point, that which is projected" (source also of Old Church Slavonic glogu "thorn"). Figurative use from 1540s. Both glossology (1716) and glottology (1841) have been used in the sense "science of language."
gloss (v.)
1570s as "insert a word as an explanation," from gloss (n.2). From 1650s as "to add luster," from gloss (n.1). Figurative sense of "smooth over, hide" is from 1729, mostly from gloss (n.1) but showing influence of gloss (n.2) in the extended verbal sense of "explain away" (1630s), from idea of a note inserted in the margin of a text to explain a difficult word. Related: Glossed; glossing.
glossary (n.)
late 14c., from Latin glossarium "collection of glosses," from Greek glossarion, diminutive of glossa "obsolete or foreign word" (see gloss (n.2)).
glossator (n.)
"writer of glosses," late 14c., from Medieval Latin glossator, from Latin glossa (see gloss (n.2)). Also in same sense were glossographer (c.1600), glossographist (1774).
glosso-
word-forming element meaning "tongue," from Greek glosso-, comb. form of glossa "tongue" (see gloss (n.2)).
glossolalia (n.)
"speaking in tongues," 1879, from Greek glossa "tongue, language" (see gloss (n.2)) + lalia "talk, prattle, a speaking," from lalein "to speak, prattle," of echoic origin.
glossy (adj.)
1550s, from gloss (n.1) + -y (2). Figurative use from 1690s. The noun sense of "photograph with a glossy surface" is from 1931. Related: Glossiness.
glottal (adj.)
1846; see glottis + -al (1). Glossal is attested from 1860.
glottis (n.)
1570s, from Greek glottis "mouth of the windpipe," from glotta, Attic dialect variant of glossa "tongue" (see gloss (n.2)).
glotto-
word-forming element meaning "language," from Attic Greek glotto-, from glotta "tongue, language" (see gloss (n.2)).
glottochronology (n.)
1953, from glotto- + chronology.
Gloucester
English county, Old English Gleawceaster, from Latin Coloniae Glev (2c.), from Glevo, a Celtic name meaning "bright place" (perhaps influenced by Old English gleaw "wise, prudent") + Old English ceaster "Roman town" (see Chester).
glove (n.)
Old English glof "glove, covering for the hand," also "palm of the hand," from Proto-Germanic *galofo (cognates: Old Norse glofi), probably from *ga- collective prefix + *lofi "hand" (cognates: Old Norse lofi, Middle English love, Gothic lofa "flat of the hand"), from PIE *lep- "be flat; palm, sole, shoulder blade" (cognates: Russian lopata "shovel;" Lithuanian lopa "claw," lopeta "shovel, spade").

German Handschuh, the usual word for "glove," literally "hand-shoe" (Old High German hantscuoh; also Danish and Swedish hantsche) is represented by Old English Handscio (the name of one of Beowulf's companions, eaten by Grendel), but this is attested only as a proper name. To fit like a glove is first recorded 1771.
glove (v.)
"to cover or fit with a glove," c.1400, from glove (n.). Related: Gloved; gloving. Glover as a surname is from mid-13c.
glow (v.)
Old English glowan "to glow, shine as if red-hot," from Proto-Germanic base *glo- (cognates: Old Saxon gloian, Old Frisian gled "glow, blaze," Old Norse gloa, Old High German gluoen, German glühen "to glow"), from PIE *ghel- (2) "to shine," with derivatives referring to bright materials and gold (see glass). Figuratively from late 14c. Related: Glowed; glowing.
glow (n.)
mid-15c., from glow (v).
glow-worm (n.)
early 14c., from glow (v.) + worm (n.).
glower (v.)
mid-14c., "to shine;" c.1500, "to stare with wide eyes," perhaps from a Scandinavian source (compare Norwegian dialectal glora "to glow"), from Proto-Germanic base *glo- (see glow (v.)), root of Old English glowan "to glow," which influenced the spelling. Or perhaps related to Middle Dutch gluren "to leer." Meaning "to look angrily, scowl" is first recorded 1775. Related: Glowered; glowering. As a noun, 1715, from the verb.
glucagon (n.)
1923, from gluco- + Greek agon, present participle of agein "to lead" (see act (n.)).
gluco-
before vowels, gluc-, word-forming element used since c.1880s, from Greek glykys "sweet" (see glucose). Now usually with reference to glucose.
glucose (n.)
1840, from French glucose (1838), said to have been coined by French professor Eugène Melchior Péligot (1811-1890) from Greek gleukos "must, sweet wine," related to glykys "sweet, delightful, dear," from *glku-, dissimilated in Greek from PIE *dlk-u- "sweet" (source also of Latin dulcis). It first was obtained from grape sugar.