gland (n.) Look up gland at Dictionary.com
1690s, from French glande (Old French glandre, 13c.), from Latin glandula "gland of the throat, tonsil," diminutive of glans (genitive glandis) "acorn, nut; acorn-shaped ball," from PIE root *gwele- (2) "acorn" (cognates: Greek balanos, Armenian kalin, Old Church Slavonic zelodi "acorn;" Lithuanian gile "oak"). Earlier English form was glandula (c.1400).
glanders (n.) Look up glanders at Dictionary.com
"horse disease characterized by glandular swelling," early 15c., from Old French glandres "swollen glands," plural of glandre, from Latin glandula (see gland).
glandular (adj.) Look up glandular at Dictionary.com
1740, from French glandulaire, from glandule "small gland" (16c.), from Latin glandula (see gland).
glans (n.) Look up glans at Dictionary.com
1640s, from Latin glans "acorn" (see gland).
glare (v.) Look up glare at Dictionary.com
late 13c., "shine brightly," from or related to Middle Dutch, Middle Low German glaren "to gleam," related by rhoticization to glas (see glass). Sense of "stare fiercely" is from late 14c. The noun is c.1400 in sense "bright light;" 1660s in sense of "fierce look." Old English glær (n.) meant "amber." Related: Glared; glaring.
glaring (adj.) Look up glaring at Dictionary.com
late 14c., from present participle of glare. Meaning "obtrusively conspicuous" is from 1706.
Glasgow Look up Glasgow at Dictionary.com
from Gaelic, literally "green hollow," from gael "green" + cau "hollow."
glasnost (n.) Look up glasnost at Dictionary.com
1972 (in reference to a letter of 1969 by Solzhenitsyn), from Russian glasnost "openness to public scrutiny," literally "publicity, fact of being public," ultimately from Old Church Slavonic glasu "voice," from PIE *gal-so-, from root *gal- (2) "to call, shout" (see call (v.)). First used in a socio-political sense by Lenin; popularized in English after Mikhail Gorbachev used it prominently in a speech of March 11, 1985, accepting the post of general secretary of the CPSU.
The Soviets, it seems, have rediscovered the value of Lenin's dictum that "glasnost," the Russian word for openness or publicity, is a desirable form of conduct. [New York Times news service article, March 1981]
glass (n.) Look up glass at Dictionary.com
Old English glæs "glass, a glass vessel," from Proto-Germanic *glasam (cognates: Old Saxon glas, Middle Dutch and Dutch glas, German Glas, Old Norse gler "glass, looking glass," Danish glar), from PIE *ghel- (2) "to shine," with derivatives referring to bright materials and gold (cognates: Latin glaber "smooth, bald," Old Church Slavonic gladuku, Lithuanian glodus "smooth"), with derivatives referring to colors and bright materials, a word that is the root of widespread words for gray, blue, green, and yellow (such as Old English glær "amber," Latin glaesum "amber," Old Irish glass "green, blue, gray," Welsh glas "blue;" see glass). Sense of "drinking glass" is early 13c.

The glass slipper in "Cinderella" is perhaps an error by Charles Perrault, translating in 1697, mistaking Old French voir "ermine, fur" for verre "glass." In other versions of the tale it is a fur slipper. The proverb about people in glass houses throwing stones is attested by 1779, but earlier forms go back to 17c.:
Who hath glass-windows of his own must take heed how he throws stones at his house. ... He that hath a body made of glass must not throw stones at another. [John Ray, "Handbook of Proverbs," 1670]
glass (v.) Look up glass at Dictionary.com
late 14c., "to fit with glass;" 1570s, "to cover with glass," from glass (n.). Related: Glassed; glassing.
glasses (n.) Look up glasses at Dictionary.com
"spectacles," 1660s, from plural of glass (n.).
glassy (adj.) Look up glassy at Dictionary.com
late 14c., from glass + -y (2).
Glastonbury Look up Glastonbury at Dictionary.com
town in Somersetshire, famous as a prehistoric site, Old English Glestingabyrig, Glastingburi (725), "Stronghold (Old English byrig, dative of burh) of the people (Old English -inga-) living at Glaston," a Celtic name, possibly meaning "woad place."
glaucoma (n.) Look up glaucoma at Dictionary.com
1640s, from Greek glaukoma "cataract, opacity of the lens" (cataracts and glaucoma not distinguished until c.1705), from -oma + glaukos, an adjective of uncertain origin (see glaucous).
glaucous (adj.) Look up glaucous at Dictionary.com
"bluish-green, gray," 1670s, from Latin glaucus "bluish-green," of uncertain origin; used in Homer of the sea as "gleaming, silvery" (apparently without a color connotation); used by later writers with a sense of "bluish-green, gray," of olive leaves and eyes. Homer's glauk-opis Athene probably originally was a "bright-eyed," not a "gray-eyed" goddess. Greek for "owl" was glaux from its bright, staring eyes.
glaze (v.) Look up glaze at Dictionary.com
mid-14c., glasen "to fit with glass," from glas (see glass), probably influenced by glazier. Noun sense of "substance used to make a glossy coating" is first attested 1784; in reference to ice, from 1752. Related: Glazed; glazing.
glazier (n.) Look up glazier at Dictionary.com
late 14c. (late 13c. as a surname; alternative glazer recorded from c.1400), from glass + -er (1), influenced by French words in -ier.
gleam (n.) Look up gleam at Dictionary.com
Old English glæm "brilliant light; brightness, splendor, radiance," from Proto-Germanic *glaimiz (cognates: Old Saxon glimo "brightness;" Middle High German glim "spark," gleime "glowworm;" German glimmen "to glimmer, glow;" Old Norse glija "to shine, glitter"), from root *glim-, from PIE *ghel- (2) "to shine," with derivatives referring to bright materials and gold (see glass).
gleam (v.) Look up gleam at Dictionary.com
early 13c., from gleam (n). Related: Gleamed; gleaming.
glean (v.) Look up glean at Dictionary.com
early 14c., from Old French glener (Modern French glaner) "to glean," from Late Latin glennare "make a collection," perhaps from Gaulish (compare Old Irish do-glinn "he collects, gathers," Celt. glan "clean, pure"). Figurative sense was earlier in English than the literal one of "gather grain left by the reapers" (late 14c.). Related: Gleaned; gleaning.
gleaner (n.) Look up gleaner at Dictionary.com
mid-15c., agent noun from glean (v.).
glebe (n.) Look up glebe at Dictionary.com
c.1300, from Old French glebe, from Latin gleba, glaeba "clod, lump of earth," from PIE *glebh- "to roll into a ball" (cognates: Latin globus "sphere;" Old English clyppan "to embrace;" Lithuanian glebys "armful," globti "to embrace, support"). Earliest English sense is "land forming a clergyman's benefice," on notion of soil of the earth as source of vegetable products.
glee (n.) Look up glee at Dictionary.com
Old English gliu, gliw "entertainment, mirth, jest, play, sport," presumably from a Proto-Germanic *gleujam but absent in other Germanic languages except for the rare Old Norse gly "joy;" probably related to glad. A poetry word in Old English and Middle English, obsolete c.1500-c.1700, it somehow found its way back to currency late 18c. In Old English, an entertainer was a gleuman (female gleo-mægden). Glee club (1814) is from the secondary sense of "unaccompanied part-song" (1650s) as a form of musical entertainment.
gleeful (adj.) Look up gleeful at Dictionary.com
1580s, from glee + -ful. Related: Gleefully. Alternative gleesome attested from c.1600.
gleek (n.) Look up gleek at Dictionary.com
card game, 1530s, from French glic, ghelicque (15c.), perhaps from Middle Dutch ghelic (Dutch gelijk) "like," because one of the goals of the game is collecting cards of the same rank.
gleen (n.) Look up gleen at Dictionary.com
"gleam of sunlight," 1650s, probably from a Scandinavian dialectal word; compare Swedish dialectal glena, Danish dialectal glene "clear patch of sky."
gleet (n.) Look up gleet at Dictionary.com
mid-14c., from Old French glete "clay, loam; slime, mud; filth" (12c., Modern French glette), from Latin glitem (nominative glis) "sticky, glutinous ground," back-formation from glittus "sticky."
glen (n.) Look up glen at Dictionary.com
"narrow valley," late 15c., from Scottish, from Gaelic gleann "mountain valley" (cognate with Old Irish glenn, Welsh glyn). Common in place names such as Glenlivet (1822), a kind of whiskey, named for the place it was first made (literally "the glen of the Livet," a tributary of the Avon); and Glengarry (1841) a kind of men's cap, of Highland origin, named for a valley in Inverness-shire.
glib (adj.) Look up glib at Dictionary.com
1590s, "smooth and slippery," possibly a shortening of obsolete glibbery "slippery," which is perhaps from Low German glibberig "smooth, slippery," from Middle Low German glibberich, from or related to glibber "jelly." Of words, speakers, etc., from c.1600. Related: Glibly; glibness.
glide (v.) Look up glide at Dictionary.com
Old English glidan "move along smoothly and easily, glide, slip, slide" (class I strong verb, past tense glad, past participle gliden), from West Germanic *glidan "to glide" (cognates: Old Saxon glidan, Old Frisian glida, German gleiten). Related: Glided; gliding. Strong past tense form glid persisted into 20c. The noun is attested 1580s, from the verb.
glider (n.) Look up glider at Dictionary.com
mid-15c., "person or thing that glides," agent noun from glide. Meaning "motorless airplane" is c.1897.
glim (n.) Look up glim at Dictionary.com
18c. slang, "a light, candle, lantern;" 19c. slang "an eye," probably a back-formation from glimmer.
glimmer (v.) Look up glimmer at Dictionary.com
early 14c., "shine brightly," a frequentative from Proto-Germanic *glim-, root of Old English glæm "brightness" (see gleam (n.)). Sense shifted 15c. to "shine faintly." Compare Dutch glimmeren, German glimmeren "to shine dimly." Related: Glimmered; glimmering.
glimmer (n.) Look up glimmer at Dictionary.com
1580s, from glimmer (v.).
glimpse (v.) Look up glimpse at Dictionary.com
c.1400, "to glisten, be dazzling," probably from Old English *glimsian "shine faintly," from Proto-Germanic *glim- (see gleam). If so, the intrusive -p- would be there to ease pronunciation. Sense of "catch a quick view" first recorded mid-15c. Related: Glimpsed. The noun is recorded from mid-16c.; earlier in verbal noun glimpsing (mid-14c.).
glint (n.) Look up glint at Dictionary.com
1540s (modern use from 1826), from glint (v.).
glint (v.) Look up glint at Dictionary.com
1787, from Scottish, where apparently it survived as an alteration of Middle English glenten "gleam, flash, glisten" (mid-15c.), from a Scandinavian source (compare Norwegian gletta "to look," dialectal Swedish glinta "to shine"), from Proto-Germanic *glent-, from PIE *ghel- (2) "to shine," with derivatives referring to bright materials and gold (see glass). Reintroduced into literary English by Burns. Related: Glinted; glinting.
glioma (n.) Look up glioma at Dictionary.com
type of brain tumor, 1870, medical Latin, literally "glue tumor," from Greek glia "glue" + -oma.
glissade Look up glissade at Dictionary.com
in dancing sense, 1832 (v.), 1843 (n.), from French glissade, from glisser "to slip, slide" (13c.), from a Germanic source (cognate with Dutch glissen), from Proto-Germanic *glidan "to glide" (see glide).
glissando (n.) Look up glissando at Dictionary.com
1873, Italianized form of French glissant, present participle of glisser (see glissade).
glisten (v.) Look up glisten at Dictionary.com
Old English glisnian "to glisten, gleam," from Proto-Germanic *glis- (cognates: Old Frisian glisa "to shine," Middle High German glistern "to sparkle," Old Danish glisse "to shine"), from PIE *ghleis-, from root *ghel- (2) "to shine," with derivatives referring to bright materials and gold (see glass). Related: Glistened; glistening.
glister (v.) Look up glister at Dictionary.com
late 14c., probably from or related to Low German glisten, Middle Dutch glisteren, from PIE root *ghel- (2) "to shine, glitter" (see glass). Related: Glistered; glistering. As a noun, from 1530s.
glitch (n.) Look up glitch at Dictionary.com
1962, American English, possibly from Yiddish glitsh "a slip," from glitshn "to slip," from German glitschen, and related gleiten "to glide" (see glide). Perhaps directly from German; it began as technical jargon in the argot of electronic hardware engineers, popularized and given a broader meaning by U.S. space program.
glitter (v.) Look up glitter at Dictionary.com
c.1300, glideren (late 14c. as gliteren), from a Scandinavian source such as Old Norse glitra "to glitter," from glit "brightness," from Proto-Germanic *glit- "shining, bright" (cognates: Old English glitenian "to glitter, shine; be distinguished," Old High German glizzan, German glitzern, Gothic glitmunjan), from PIE *ghleid- (cognates: Greek khlidon, khlidos "ornament"), from root *ghel- (2) "to shine," with derivatives referring to bright materials and gold (see glass). Related: Glittered; glittering. The noun is c.1600, from the verb. Glitter rock is from 1972.
glitterati (n.) Look up glitterati at Dictionary.com
1956, from glitter, with a play on literati.
glitz (n.) Look up glitz at Dictionary.com
1977, a back-formation from glitzy.
glitzy (adj.) Look up glitzy at Dictionary.com
1966, from Yiddish glitz "glitter," from German glitzern "sparkle" (see glitter).
gloam Look up gloam at Dictionary.com
1821 (Keats), a back-formation from gloaming.
gloaming (n.) Look up gloaming at Dictionary.com
Old English glomung "twilight," formed (probably on model of æfning "evening") from glom "twilight," related to glowan "to glow" (hence "glow of sunrise or sunset"), from Proto-Germanic *glo- (see glow (v.)). Fell from currency except in Yorkshire dialect, but preserved in Scotland and reintroduced by Burns and other Scottish writers after 1785.
gloat (v.) Look up gloat at Dictionary.com
1570s, "to look at furtively," from a Scandinavian source such as Old Norse glotta "to grin, smile scornfully, show the teeth," Swedish dialectal glotta "to peep;" or from Middle High German glotzen "to stare, gape." Sense of "to look at with malicious satisfaction" first recorded 1748. Related: Gloated; gloating. As a noun, from 1640s with sense of "side-glance;" 1899 as "act of gloating."