Freudian (adj.) Look up Freudian at Dictionary.com
1910, used at first in a general way for "sexual," from name of Sigmund Freud (1856-1939), Austrian psychiatrist. Freudian slip first attested 1959.
Freya Look up Freya at Dictionary.com
goddess of love and beauty in Norse mythology, Old Norse Freyja, related to Old English frea "lord," Old Saxon frua, Middle Dutch vrouwe "woman, wife," German Frau; see frau).
Frigga is usually considered the goddess of married love; Freya, the goddess of love, the northern Venus. Actually, Frigga is of the Aesir family of Scandinavian myth; Freya, of the Vanir family; the two lines of belief merged, and the two goddesses are sometimes fused, and sometimes confused. [Joseph T. Shipley, "The Origins of English Words," 1984]
friable (adj.) Look up friable at Dictionary.com
1560s, from Middle French friable and directly from Latin friabilis "easily crumbled or broken," from friare "rub away, crumble into small pieces," related to fricare "to rub" (see friction). Related: Friability.
friar (n.) Look up friar at Dictionary.com
late 13c., from Old French frere "brother, friar" (9c.), originally the mendicant orders (Franciscans, Augustines, Dominicans, Carmelites), who reached England early 13c., from Latin frater "brother" (see brother).
fricassee (n.) Look up fricassee at Dictionary.com
1560s, from Middle French fricassée, fem. past participle of fricasser "mince and cook in sauce" (15c.), of uncertain origin, perhaps related to or compounded from Middle French frire "to fry" (see fry (v.)) and casser, quasser "break, cut up." As a verb, from 1650s.
fricative Look up fricative at Dictionary.com
1860 (adj.), 1863 (n.), from Modern Latin fricativus, from Latin fricatus, past participle of fricare "to rub" (see friction).
fricking (adj.) Look up fricking at Dictionary.com
euphemism for fucking, by 1913. Related: Frick (v.).
friction (n.) Look up friction at Dictionary.com
1560s, "a chafing, rubbing," from Middle French friction (16c.) and directly from Latin frictionem (nominative frictio) "a rubbing, rubbing down," noun of action from past participle stem of fricare "to rub," of uncertain origin. Sense of "resistance to motion" is from 1722; figurative sense of "disagreement, clash" first recorded 1761. Related: Frictional.
Friday (n.) Look up Friday at Dictionary.com
sixth day of the week, Old English frigedæg "Frigga's day," from Frige, genitive of Frig (see Frigg), Germanic goddess of married love, a West Germanic translation of Latin dies Veneris "day of (the planet) Venus," which itself translated Greek Aphrodites hemera.

Compare Old Norse frijadagr, Old Frisian frigendei, Middle Dutch vridach, Dutch vrijdag, German Freitag "Friday," and the Latin-derived cognates Old French vendresdi, French vendredi, Spanish viernes.

In the Germanic pantheon, Freya (q.v.) corresponds more closely in character to Venus than Frigg does, and some early Icelandic writers used Freyjudagr for "Friday."

Black Friday as the name for the busy shopping day after U.S. Thanksgiving holiday is said to date from 1960s and perhaps was coined by those who had the job of controlling the crowds, not by the merchants; earlier it was used principally of days when financial markets crashed.
fridge (n.) Look up fridge at Dictionary.com
shortened and altered form of refrigerator, 1926, perhaps influenced by Frigidaire (1919), a popular early brand name of the appliances. Frigerator as a colloquial shortening is attested by 1886.
fried (adj.) Look up fried at Dictionary.com
mid-14c., past participle adjective from fry (v.).
friend (n.) Look up friend at Dictionary.com
Old English freond "friend," from Proto-Germanic *frijand- "lover, friend" (cognates: Old Norse frændi, Old Frisian friund, Middle High German friunt, German Freund, Gothic frijonds "friend"), from PIE *priy-ont-, present participle form of root *pri- "to love" (see free (adj.)).

Meaning "a Quaker" (a member of the Society of Friends) is from 1670s. Feond ("fiend," originally "enemy") and freond often were paired alliteratively in Old English; both are masculine agent nouns derived from present participle of verbs, but are not directly related to one another (see fiend). Related: Friends.
friend (v.) Look up friend at Dictionary.com
in the Facebook sense, attested from 2005, from the noun, but friend has been used as a verb in English since late 14c. Related: Friended; friending. Old English had freonsped "an abundance of friends" (see speed (n.)); freondleast "want of friends;" freondspedig "rich in friends", all of which would be useful now.
friendless (adj.) Look up friendless at Dictionary.com
Old English freondleas; see friend (n.) + -less. Related: Friendlessly; friendlessness.
friendly (adj.) Look up friendly at Dictionary.com
Old English freondlic; see friend (n.) + -ly (1). Related: Friendlily; friendliness.
friendship (n.) Look up friendship at Dictionary.com
Old English freondscipe; see friend (n.) + -ship.
frieze (n.) Look up frieze at Dictionary.com
"sculptured horizontal band in architecture," 1560s, from Middle French frise, originally "a ruff," from Medieval Latin frisium "embroidered border," variant of frigium, probably from Latin Phrygium "Phrygian, Phrygian work," from Phrygia, the ancient country in Asia Minor known for its embroidery (compare Phrygiae vestes "ornate garments"). Meaning "decorative band along the top of a wall" was in Old French.
frig (v.) Look up frig at Dictionary.com
"to move about restlessly," mid-15c., perhaps a variant of frisk (q.v.). As a euphemism for "to fuck" it dates from 1680s, earlier as "to masturbate" (1670s). Related: Frigged; frigging.
frigate (n.) Look up frigate at Dictionary.com
1580s, from Middle French frégate (1520s), from Italian fregata (Neapolitan fregate), like many ship names, of unknown origin. Originally a small, swift vessel; the word was applied to progressively larger types over the years, but since 1943 it is used mainly of escort ships.
[A] light nimble vessel built for speed; employed in particular for the gleaning of intelligence and the protection and assault of trade-routes. In battle the frigates took station on the disengaged side of the fleet, where they repeated signals, sped on messages, and succoured the distressed. [Sir Geoffrey Callender, "Sea Passages," 1943]
Frigg Look up Frigg at Dictionary.com
Old English, but only in compounds such as frigedæg "Friday," Frigeæfen (what we would call "Thursday evening"). In Germanic religion, wife of Odin, goddess of heaven and married love. The English word is from Old Norse, a noun use of the fem. adjective meaning "beloved, loving," also "wife," from Proto-Germanic *frijaz "noble, dear, beloved" (from the same root as Old English freogan "to love;" ultimately from the root of free (adj.)). Also compare Frau.
frigging (adj.) Look up frigging at Dictionary.com
by 1936 as an expletive, from present participle of frig.
fright (n.) Look up fright at Dictionary.com
Old English (Northumbrian) fryhto, metathesis of fyrhtu "fear, dread, trembling, horrible sight," from Proto-Germanic *furkhtaz "afraid" (cognates: Old Saxon forhta, Old Frisian fruchte, Old High German forhta, German Furcht, Gothic faurhtei "fear"). Not etymologically related to the word fear, which superseded it 13c. as the principal word except in cases of sudden terror. For spelling evolution, see fight.
frighten (v.) Look up frighten at Dictionary.com
1660s, from fright + -en (1). Related: Frightened; frightening. The earlier verb was simply fright (Old English fyrhtan) "to frighten."
frightful (adj.) Look up frightful at Dictionary.com
mid-13c., "timid;" c.1600 "alarming;" from fright + -ful. In common with most -ful adjectives, it once had both an active and passive sense. Meaning "dreadful, horrible, shocking" (often hyperbolic) is attested from c.1700; Johnson noted it as "a cant word among women for anything unpleasing." Related: Frightfully.
frigid (adj.) Look up frigid at Dictionary.com
1620s, from Latin frigidus "cold, chill, cool," figuratively "indifferent," from stem of frigere "be cold;" related to frigus "cold, coldness, frost," from PIE root *srig- "cold."

The meaning "wanting in sexual heat" is attested from 1650s. Frigidaire as the proprietary name of a brand of self-contained automatically operated iceless refrigerator dates from 1919 (Frigidaire Corporation, Detroit, Michigan, U.S.).
frigidity (n.) Look up frigidity at Dictionary.com
early 15c., from Middle French frigidité (15c.), from Late Latin frigiditatem (nominative frigiditas) "the cold," from Latin frigidus "cold" (see frigid).
frigorific (adj.) Look up frigorific at Dictionary.com
"causing cold," 1660s, from French frigorifique, from Late Latin frigorificus "cooling," from Latin frigus (genitive frigoris) "cold, cool, coolness" (see frigid) + -ficus "making," root of facere "make, do" (see factitious).
frijoles (n.) Look up frijoles at Dictionary.com
1570s, from Spanish frijoles (plural) "beans," from Latin phaseolus, phaselus "kidney bean," from Greek phaselos "a kind of bean."
frill (n.) Look up frill at Dictionary.com
"wavy ornamental edging," 1801 (with a doubtful attestation from 1590s), of uncertain origin despite much speculation [see OED]; figurative sense of "useless ornament" first recorded 1893. The verb meaning "to furnish with a frill" is recorded in 1570s. Related: Frilled.
frills (n.) Look up frills at Dictionary.com
"mere embellishments," 1893, often in negative constructions; earlier "affectation of dress or manner" (1845); see frill.
frilly (adj.) Look up frilly at Dictionary.com
1843, from frill + -y (2). Related: Frilliness.
fringe (n.) Look up fringe at Dictionary.com
early 14c., from Old French frenge "thread, strand, fringe, hem" (early 14c.), from Vulgar Latin *frimbia, metathesis of Latin fimbriae (plural) "fibers, threads, fringe," of uncertain origin. Figurative sense of "outer edge, margin," is first recorded 1894. Related: Fringes. Fringe benefits is recorded from 1952.
fringe (v.) Look up fringe at Dictionary.com
late 15c., from fringe (n.). Related: Fringed; fringing.
frippery (n.) Look up frippery at Dictionary.com
1560s, "old clothes, cast-off garments," from Middle French friperie "old clothes, an old clothes shop," from Old French freperie, feuperie "old rags, rubbish" (13c.), from frepe, feupe "fringe; rags, old clothes," from Late Latin faluppa "chip, splinter, straw, fiber." The notion is of "things worn down, clothes rubbed to rags." The ironic meaning "finery" (but with overtones of tawdriness) dates from 1630s.
Frisbee Look up Frisbee at Dictionary.com
1957, trademark registered 1959 by Wham-O Co., the prototype modeled on pie tins from Mrs. Frisbie's Pies, made by the Frisbie Bakery of Bridgeport, Connecticut, U.S. Middlebury College students began tossing them around in the 1930s (though Yale and Princeton also claim to have discovered their aerodynamic qualities).
Thirteen years ago the Wham-O Manufacturing Company of San Gabriel, Calif., ... brought out the first Frisbee. Wham-O purchased the rights from a Los Angeles building inspector named Fred Morrison, who in turn had been inspired by the airworthy pie tins of the Frisbie Bakery in Bridgeport, Conn. (which went out of business in March of 1958). He changed the spelling to avoid legal problems. ["Sports Illustrated," Aug. 3, 1970]
The family name is attested in English records from 1226, from a place name in Leicestershire (Frisby on the Wreak), attested from 1086, from Old Danish, meaning "farmstead or village of the Frisians" (Old Norse Frisa, genitive plural of Frisr). Also see by (prep.).
Frisco Look up Frisco at Dictionary.com
colloquial shortening of San Francisco, California, U.S., attested by 1856.
Frisian (adj.) Look up Frisian at Dictionary.com
"of or pertaining to the people of Frisia," or "belonging to the tribe of the Frisii," 1590s, from Latin Frisii, from a Germanic tribal name (source also of Old Frisian Frise, Middle Dutch Vriese, Old High German Friaso, Old English Frisa), perhaps originally meaning "curly-headed" (compare Old Frisian frisle "curly hair"). As a noun, "West Germanic language spoken in Friesland," the lowland coast of the North Sea and nearby islands, closely related to Dutch and Old English.
frisk (v.) Look up frisk at Dictionary.com
1510s, "to dance, frolic," from Middle English frisk "lively" (mid-15c.), from Middle French frisque "lively, brisk," from Old French frisque "fresh, new; merry, animated" (13c.), possibly from a Germanic source (compare Middle Dutch vrisch "fresh," Old High German frisc "lively;" see fresh (adj.1)). Sense of "pat down in a search" first recorded 1781. Related: Frisked; frisking. As a noun from 1520s.
frisky (adj.) Look up frisky at Dictionary.com
c.1500, from frisk "lively" + -y (2). Related: Friskiness.
frisson (n.) Look up frisson at Dictionary.com
1777, from French frisson, literally "shiver, thrill" (12c.), from Latin frigere "to be cold" (see frigid).
frist (n.) Look up frist at Dictionary.com
"a space of time," Old English frist, first "space of time" (compare Old Frisian first, Old High German frist, Old Norse frest). As a verb, meaning "delay," from early 13c.
frit (n.) Look up frit at Dictionary.com
"material for glass-making," 1660s, from Italian fritta, fem. past participle of friggere "to fry," from Latin frigere "to roast, poach, fry" (see fry (v.)).
fritillary (n.) Look up fritillary at Dictionary.com
type of butterfly, 1857, earlier a type of plant (Fritillaria Meleagris, 1633), from Latin fritillus "dice-box," from fritinnire "to twitter," imitative of the rattle of dice. The butterfly so called perhaps from resemblance of its markings to those of dice; or the names may have been given in confusion, perhaps on the notion that fritillus meant "chessboard."
frittata (n.) Look up frittata at Dictionary.com
1884, from Italian frittata, from fritto "fried" (see frit).
fritter (v.) Look up fritter at Dictionary.com
"whittle away," 1728, from fritters "fragment or shred," possibly from a noun sense, but this is not recorded as early as the verb; perhaps an alteration of 16c. fitters "fragments or pieces," perhaps ultimately from Old French fraiture "a breaking," from Latin fractura. Or perhaps from a Germanic source (compare Middle High German vetze "clothes, rags").
fritter (n.) Look up fritter at Dictionary.com
"fried batter," late 14c., from Old French friture "fritter, pancake, something fried" (12c.), from Late Latin frictura "a frying," from frigere "to roast, fry" (see fry (v.)).
Fritz Look up Fritz at Dictionary.com
German familiar form of masc. proper name Friedrich; as a characteristic name for a German, from 1883, especially in World War I. On the fritz "inoperative" (1903) is American English slang, of unknown origin. Earliest references suggest a theatrical origin.
frivolity (n.) Look up frivolity at Dictionary.com
1796, from French frivolité, from Old French frivole "frivolous," from Latin frivolus (see frivolous).
frivolous (adj.) Look up frivolous at Dictionary.com
mid-15c., from Latin frivolus "silly, empty, trifling, worthless, brittle," diminutive of *frivos "broken, crumbled," from friare "break, rub away, crumble." Related: Frivolously; frivolousness.
frizz (v.) Look up frizz at Dictionary.com
also friz, 1610s (implied in frizzed), probably from French friser "to curl, dress the hair" (16c.), perhaps from stem of frire "to fry, cook." Assimilated to native frizzle. Related: Frizzed; frizzing. As a noun from 1660s, "frizzed hair."