freestyle (n.)
1912, in swimming, in reference to a distance race in which the swimmers may use whatever stroke they choose; 1950 in general use, from free + style. As an adjective, from 1957; as a verb, by 1970 (in martial arts).
freewheeling (adj.)
1903, from free wheel (1899, see free (adj.) + wheel); a bicycle wheel that turns even when not being pedaled, later from the name of a kind of automobile drive system that allowed cars to coast without being slowed by the engine. Figurative sense is from 1911.
freeze (v.)
Old English freosan "turn to ice" (class II strong verb; past tense freas, past participle froren), from Proto-Germanic *freusan "to freeze" (cognates: Old Norse frjosa, Old High German friosan, German frieren "to freeze," Gothic frius "frost"), from Proto-Germanic *freus-, equivalent to PIE root *preus- "to freeze," also "to burn" (cognates: Sanskrit prusva, Latin pruina "hoarfrost," Welsh rhew "frost," Sanskrit prustah "burnt," Albanian prus "burning coals," Latin pruna "a live coal").

Transitive sense first recorded 14c., figurative sense c.1400. Meaning "become rigid or motionless" attested by 1720. Sense of "fix at a certain level, make non-transactable" is 1922. Freeze frame is from 1960, originally "a briefly Frozen Shot after the Jingle to allow ample time for Change over at the end of a T.V. 'Commercial.' " ["ABC of Film & TV," 1960].
freeze (n.)
c.1400, from freeze (v.).
freezer (n.)
1847 as the name of an item in ice-cream manufacture; from freeze (v.) + -er (1). As a household appliance, from 1945. Freezer burn attested from 1929.
freight (n.)
early 13c., fraght, from Middle Dutch or Middle Low German vracht, vrecht, meaning originally "cost of transport" and probably from a lost Old Frisian word, from Proto-Germanic *fra-aihtiz "absolute possession, property" (source also of Old High German freht "earnings"), from *fra-, intensive prefix, + *aik "to be master of, possess," from PIE *aik- (see owe). Meaning "transporting of goods or passengers for money" is from late 14c. Danish fragt, Swedish frakt apparently also are from Frisian. As a verb, from late 14c.
freightage (n.)
1690s, a hybrid word, from freight + -age.
freighter (n.)
1620s, "one who loads," agent noun from freight (v.). Meaning "a cargo vessel" is from 1839, American English.
French (adj.)
Old English frencisc "of the Franks," from Franca (see Frank). The noun is from Old English Frencisc. As the name of a language, from late 13c.

Euphemistic meaning "bad language" (pardon my French) is from 1895. Used in many combination-words, often dealing with food or sex. French dressing recorded by 1860; French toast is from 1630s. French letter "condom" (c.1856, perhaps on resemblance of sheepskin and parchment), French (v.) "perform oral sex on" (c.1917) and French kiss (1923) all probably stem from the Anglo-Saxon equation of Gallic culture and sexual sophistication, a sense first recorded 1749 in the phrase French novel.

To take French leave, "depart without telling the host," is 1771, from a social custom then prevalent. However, this is said to be called in France filer à l'anglaise, literally "to take English leave."
French fries (n.)
1903, American English, earlier French fried potatoes (by 1883). French frieds (1944) never caught on. Simple short form fries attested by 1973. In the Upper Midwest of the U.S., sometimes called American fries (1950).
Frenchify (v.)
1590s, from French + -ify. Usually contemptuous (Richardson in his introduction to "Pamela," beseeches the editor not to "Frenchify our English solidity into froth and whip-syllabub"). Related: Frenchified; Frenchifying.
frenetic (adj.)
late 14c., from Old French frenetike, from Latin phreneticus "delirious," alteration of Greek phrenitikos, from phrenitis "frenzy," literally "inflammation of the brain," from phren "mind, reason" (from PIE *gwhren- "to think") + -itis. The classical ph- was restored mid-16c. Related: Frenetically.
frenzied (adj.)
1796; see frenzy.
frenzy (n.)
mid-14c., "delirium, insanity," from Old French frenesie, from Medieval Latin phrenesia, from phrenesis, back-formation from Latin phreneticus "delirious" (see frenetic). Meaning "excited state of mind" is from c.1400.
Freon (n.)
refrigerant chemical, 1932, proprietary name in U.S. for fluorocarbons used in refrigeration technology. "The name was apparently constructed from fre(eze) + -on used as an arbitrary suffix" [Flood].
frequence (n.)
1530s, from French fréquence, from Latin frequentia (see frequent).
frequency (n.)
1640s, "fact of occurring often," from Latin frequentia "a crowding, crowd," from frequentem (see frequent).

Earlier it had been used in a now-obsolete sense of "state of being crowded" (mid-16c.); sense in physics, "rate of recurrence," especially of a vibration, is from 1831. In radio electronics, frequency modulation (1922, abbreviated F.M.) as a system of broadcasting is distinguished from amplitude modulation (or A.M.).
frequent (adj.)
mid-15c., "ample, profuse," from Middle French frequent, or directly from Latin frequentem (nominative frequens) "crowded, repeated," of uncertain origin. Meaning "common, usual" is from 1530s; that of "happening at short intervals, often recurring" is from c.1600.
frequent (v.)
late 15c., from Middle French frequenter, from Latin frequentare "visit regularly," from frequentem (see frequent (adj.)). Related: Frequented; frequenting.
frequentative (n.)
"verb which expresses repetition of action," 1520s, from French fréquentatif, from Late Latin frequentativus "that which denotes the repetition of an act," from Latin frequentatus, past participle of frequentare "visit regularly," from frequentem (see frequent (adj.)).
frequently (adv.)
1530s, from frequent (adj.) + -ly (2).
fresco (n.)
1590s, in fresco, literally "in fresh," with a sense of "painted on fresh mortar or plaster," from Italian fresco "cool, fresh," from Proto-Germanic *friskaz (see fresh (adj.1)).
fresh (adj.1)
late 13c. "unsalted, pure, sweet, eager," metathesis of Old English fersc "unsalted," from West Germanic *friskaz (cognates: Old Frisian fersk, Middle Dutch versch, Dutch vers, Old High German frisc, German frisch "fresh").

Probably cognate with Old Church Slavonic presinu "fresh," Lithuanian preskas "sweet." The metathesis, and the expanded Middle English senses of "new, pure, eager" are probably by influence of (or in some instances, from) Old French fres (fem. fresche), from Proto-Germanic *frisko-, and thus related to the English word. The Germanic root also is the source of Italian and Spanish fresco. Related: Freshly; freshness.
fresh (adj.2)
"impudent, presumptuous," 1848, U.S. slang, probably from German frech "insolent, cheeky," from Old High German freh "covetous," related to Old English frec "greedy, bold" (see freak (n.)).
freshen (v.)
1690s, from fresh (adj.1) + -en (1). Related: Freshened; freshening. To freshen a drink, "top it off" is from 1961. The earlier verb was simply fresh (mid-14c.).
freshet (n.)
1590s, "stream flowing into the sea," from fresh (adj.1) in a now obsolete sense of "flood, stream of fresh water" (1530s). Old English had fersceta in the same sense. Meaning "flood caused by rain or melting snow" is from 1650s.
freshman (n.)
mid-16c., "newcomer, novice," from fresh (adj.1) + man (n.). Sense of "university student in first year" is attested from 1590s. Related: Freshmen.
freshwater (adj.)
also fresh water, 1520s, from fresh (adj.1) + water (n.1).
fret (v.)
"be peevish or worried," early 12c., from Old English fretan "eat, devour" (in Old English used of monsters and Vikings; in Middle English used of animals' eating), from Proto-Germanic compound *fra- "for-" + *etan "to eat" (cognates: Dutch vreton, Old High German freggan, German fressen, Gothic fraitan). Transitive sense of "eat away" is from late 12c. Figurative sense of "irritate, worry, eat one's heart out" is c.1200. Modern German still distinguishes essen for humans and fressen for animals. Related: Fretted; fretting. As a noun, from early 15c.
fret (n.)
"ornamental interlaced pattern," late 14c., from Old French frete "interlaced work, trellis work," probably from Frankish *fetur or another Germanic source (cognates: Old English fetor, Old High German feggara "fetter") perhaps from notion of "decorative anklet," or of materials "bound" together. The other noun, "ridge on the fingerboard of a guitar," is c.1500 of unknown origin but possibly another sense of Old French frete.
fretful (adj.)
1590s, from fret (v.) + -ful. Related: Fretfully.
fretwork (n.)
also fret-work, c.1600, from fret (n.) + work (n.).
Freudian (adj.)
1910, used at first in a general way for "sexual," from name of Sigmund Freud (1856-1939), Austrian psychiatrist. Freudian slip first attested 1959.
Freya
goddess of love and beauty in Norse mythology, Old Norse Freyja, related to Old English frea "lord," Old Saxon frua, Middle Dutch vrouwe "woman, wife," German Frau; see frau).
Frigga is usually considered the goddess of married love; Freya, the goddess of love, the northern Venus. Actually, Frigga is of the Aesir family of Scandinavian myth; Freya, of the Vanir family; the two lines of belief merged, and the two goddesses are sometimes fused, and sometimes confused. [Joseph T. Shipley, "The Origins of English Words," 1984]
friable (adj.)
1560s, from Middle French friable and directly from Latin friabilis "easily crumbled or broken," from friare "rub away, crumble into small pieces," related to fricare "to rub" (see friction). Related: Friability.
friar (n.)
late 13c., from Old French frere "brother, friar" (9c.), originally the mendicant orders (Franciscans, Augustines, Dominicans, Carmelites), who reached England early 13c., from Latin frater "brother" (see brother).
fricassee (n.)
1560s, from Middle French fricassée, fem. past participle of fricasser "mince and cook in sauce" (15c.), of uncertain origin, perhaps related to or compounded from Middle French frire "to fry" (see fry (v.)) and casser, quasser "break, cut up." As a verb, from 1650s.
fricative
1860 (adj.), 1863 (n.), from Modern Latin fricativus, from Latin fricatus, past participle of fricare "to rub" (see friction).
fricking (adj.)
euphemism for fucking, by 1913. Related: Frick (v.).
friction (n.)
1560s, "a chafing, rubbing," from Middle French friction (16c.) and directly from Latin frictionem (nominative frictio) "a rubbing, rubbing down," noun of action from past participle stem of fricare "to rub," of uncertain origin. Sense of "resistance to motion" is from 1722; figurative sense of "disagreement, clash" first recorded 1761. Related: Frictional.
Friday (n.)
sixth day of the week, Old English frigedæg "Frigga's day," from Frige, genitive of Frig (see Frigg), Germanic goddess of married love, a West Germanic translation of Latin dies Veneris "day of (the planet) Venus," which itself translated Greek Aphrodites hemera.

Compare Old Norse frijadagr, Old Frisian frigendei, Middle Dutch vridach, Dutch vrijdag, German Freitag "Friday," and the Latin-derived cognates Old French vendresdi, French vendredi, Spanish viernes.

In the Germanic pantheon, Freya (q.v.) corresponds more closely in character to Venus than Frigg does, and some early Icelandic writers used Freyjudagr for "Friday."

Black Friday as the name for the busy shopping day after U.S. Thanksgiving holiday is said to date from 1960s and perhaps was coined by those who had the job of controlling the crowds, not by the merchants; earlier it was used principally of days when financial markets crashed.
fridge (n.)
shortened and altered form of refrigerator, 1926, perhaps influenced by Frigidaire (1919), a popular early brand name of the appliances. Frigerator as a colloquial shortening is attested by 1886.
fried (adj.)
mid-14c., past participle adjective from fry (v.).
friend (n.)
Old English freond "friend," from Proto-Germanic *frijand- "lover, friend" (cognates: Old Norse frændi, Old Frisian friund, Middle High German friunt, German Freund, Gothic frijonds "friend"), from PIE *priy-ont-, present participle form of root *pri- "to love" (see free (adj.)).

Meaning "a Quaker" (a member of the Society of Friends) is from 1670s. Feond ("fiend," originally "enemy") and freond often were paired alliteratively in Old English; both are masculine agent nouns derived from present participle of verbs, but are not directly related to one another (see fiend). Related: Friends.
friend (v.)
in the Facebook sense, attested from 2005, from the noun, but friend has been used as a verb in English since late 14c. Related: Friended; friending. Old English had freonsped "an abundance of friends" (see speed (n.)); freondleast "want of friends;" freondspedig "rich in friends", all of which would be useful now.
friendless (adj.)
Old English freondleas; see friend (n.) + -less. Related: Friendlessly; friendlessness.
friendly (adj.)
Old English freondlic; see friend (n.) + -ly (1). Related: Friendlily; friendliness.
friendship (n.)
Old English freondscipe; see friend (n.) + -ship.
frieze (n.)
"sculptured horizontal band in architecture," 1560s, from Middle French frise, originally "a ruff," from Medieval Latin frisium "embroidered border," variant of frigium, probably from Latin Phrygium "Phrygian, Phrygian work," from Phrygia, the ancient country in Asia Minor known for its embroidery (compare Phrygiae vestes "ornate garments"). Meaning "decorative band along the top of a wall" was in Old French.
frig (v.)
"to move about restlessly," mid-15c., perhaps a variant of frisk (q.v.). As a euphemism for "to fuck" it dates from 1680s, earlier as "to masturbate" (1670s). Related: Frigged; frigging.