fowl (n.) Look up fowl at Dictionary.com
Old English fugel "bird," representing the general Germanic word for them, from Proto-Germanic *foglaz (cognates: Old Frisian fugel, Old Norse fugl, Middle Dutch voghel, Dutch vogel, German vogel, Gothic fugls), probably by dissimilation from *flug-la-, literally "flyer," from the same root as Old English fleogan, modern fly (v.1).

Originally "bird;" narrower sense of "domestic hen or rooster" (the main modern meaning) is first recorded 1570s; in U.S. also extended to ducks and geese. As a verb, Old English fuglian "to catch birds." Related: Fowled; fowling.
fowler (n.) Look up fowler at Dictionary.com
Old English fugelere, agent noun from fuglian "to hunt fowl" (see fowl).
fox (n.) Look up fox at Dictionary.com
Old English fox, from Proto-Germanic *fukhs (cognates Old Saxon vohs, Middle Dutch and Dutch vos, Old High German fuhs, German Fuchs, Old Norse foa, Gothic fauho), from Proto-Germanic base *fuh-, corresponding to PIE *puk- "tail" (source also of Sanskrit puccha- "tail").

The bushy tail is also the source of words for "fox" in Welsh (llwynog, from llwyn "bush"); Spanish (raposa, from rabo "tail"); and Lithuanian (uodegis "fox," from uodega "tail"). Metaphoric extension to "clever person" is early 13c. Meaning "sexually attractive woman" is from 1940s; but foxy in this sense is recorded from 1895.
Fox Look up Fox at Dictionary.com
Algonquian people, confederated with the Sac after 1760, translating French renards, which itself may be a translation of an Iroquoian term meaning "red fox people." Their name for themselves is /meškwahki:-haki/ "red earths." French renard "fox" is from Reginhard, the name of the fox in old Northern European fables (as in Low German Reinke de Vos), originally "strong in council, wily."
fox (v.) Look up fox at Dictionary.com
1560s (but perhaps implied in Old English foxung "foxlike wile, craftiness"), from fox (n.). Foxed in booksellers' catalogues means "stained with fox-colored marks." In other contexts, it typically meant "drunk" (1610s).
fox trot (n.) Look up fox trot at Dictionary.com
also fox-trot, foxtrot, "pace with short steps," such as a fox's, 1872, from fox (n.) + trot (n.). As a type of popular dance, from 1915.
fox-fire (n.) Look up fox-fire at Dictionary.com
also foxfire, late 15c., from fox (n.) + fire (n.).
fox-hunting (n.) Look up fox-hunting at Dictionary.com
1670s, from fox (n.) + hunting. Related: Fox-hunt; fox-hunter.
foxglove (n.) Look up foxglove at Dictionary.com
Old English foxes glofa; the reason for fox is uncertain. Compare Old English foxesfot ("fox foot") "xiphion;" foxesclate "burdock."
foxhole (n.) Look up foxhole at Dictionary.com
also fox-hole, Old English fox-hol "a fox's den," from fox (n.) + hole (n.). Military sense is from World War I.
foxhound (n.) Look up foxhound at Dictionary.com
1763, from fox (n.) + hound (n.).
foxy (adj.) Look up foxy at Dictionary.com
1520s, "crafty, cunning," from fox (n.) + -y (2). Of colors, stains, tints, etc. from 18c. Meaning "attractive" is 1895, American English slang. Related: Foxiness.
foy (n.) Look up foy at Dictionary.com
"parting entertainment," Scottish and dialectal, late 15c., probably ultimately from French voie "way, journey" (see voyage (n.)).
foyer (n.) Look up foyer at Dictionary.com
1859, from French foyer "green room, room for actors when not on stage," literally "fireplace," from Old French foier "furnace, stove, hearth, fireplace" (12c.), from Latin focarium, noun use of neuter of adjective focarius "having to do with the hearth," from focus "hearth, fireplace" (see focus (n.)).
fracas (n.) Look up fracas at Dictionary.com
1727, from French fracas (15c.), from Italian fracasso "uproar, crash," back-formation from fracassare "to smash, crash, break in pieces," from fra-, a shortening of Latin infra "below" + Italian cassare "to break," from Latin quassare "to shake" (see quash).
fractal Look up fractal at Dictionary.com
1975, from French fractal, from Latin fractus "interrupted, irregular," literally "broken," past participle of frangere "to break" (see fraction). Coined by French mathematician Benoit Mandelbrot in "Les Objets Fractals."
Many important spatial patterns of Nature are either irregular or fragmented to such an extreme degree that ... classical geometry ... is hardly of any help in describing their form. ... I hope to show that it is possible in many cases to remedy this absence of geometric representation by using a family of shapes I propose to call fractals -- or fractal sets. [Mandelbrot, "Fractals," 1977]
fraction (n.) Look up fraction at Dictionary.com
late 14c., originally in the mathematical sense, from Anglo-French fraccioun (Old French fraccion, 12c., "breaking") and directly from Late Latin fractionem (nominative fractio) "a breaking," especially into pieces, noun of action from past participle stem of Latin frangere "to break," from PIE root *bhreg- "to break" (cognates: Sanskrit (giri)-bhraj "breaking-forth (out of the mountains);" Gothic brikan, Old English brecan "to break;" Lithuanian brasketi "crash, crack;" Old Irish braigim "break" wind). Meaning "a breaking or dividing" is from early 15c.; sense of "broken off piece, fragment," is from c.1600.
fractional (adj.) Look up fractional at Dictionary.com
1670s, from fraction + -al (1).
fractious (adj.) Look up fractious at Dictionary.com
1725, from fraction in an obsolete sense of "a brawling, discord" (c.1500) + -ous; probably on model of captious. Related: Fractiously; fractiousness.
fracture (n.) Look up fracture at Dictionary.com
early 15c., "a breaking of a bone," from Middle French fracture (14c.), from Latin fractura "a breach, break, cleft," from fractus, past participle of frangere "to break" (see fraction).
fracture (v.) Look up fracture at Dictionary.com
1610s (implied in fractured), from fracture (n.). Related: Fracturing.
frag (v.) Look up frag at Dictionary.com
by 1970, U.S. military slang, from slang noun shortening of fragmentation grenade (1918). Related: Fragged; fragging.
Fragging is a macabre ritual of Vietnam in which American enlisted men attempt to murder their superiors. The word comes from the nickname for hand grenades, a weapon popular with enlisted men because the evidence is destroyed with the consummation of the crime. ["Saturday Review," Jan. 8, 1972]
fragile (adj.) Look up fragile at Dictionary.com
1510s, "liable to sin, morally weak;" c.1600, "liable to break;" a back-formation from fragility, or else from Middle French fragile (14c.), from Latin fragilis (see fragility). Transferred sense of "frail" (of persons) is from 1858.
fragility (n.) Look up fragility at Dictionary.com
late 14c., "moral weakness," from Old French fragilité "debility, frailty" (12c.), from Latin fragilitatem (nominative fragilitas) "brittleness," from fragilis "brittle, easily broken," from root of frangere "to break" (see fraction). Meaning "quality of being easily broken" first recorded in English late 15c.
fragment (n.) Look up fragment at Dictionary.com
early 15c., from Latin fragmentum "a fragment, remnant," literally "a piece broken off," from root of frangere "to break" (see fraction).
fragment (v.) Look up fragment at Dictionary.com
by 1788 (implied in fragmented), from fragment (n.). Related: Fragmenting.
fragmentary (adj.) Look up fragmentary at Dictionary.com
1835 (with an isolated use in Donne from 1611), from fragment + -ary.
fragmentation (n.) Look up fragmentation at Dictionary.com
1881, from fragment + -ation. Fragmentation grenade attested from 1918.
fragrance (n.) Look up fragrance at Dictionary.com
1660s, from French fragrance or directly from Late Latin fragrantia, from fragrantem (see fragrant).
fragrant (adj.) Look up fragrant at Dictionary.com
mid-15c., from Latin fragrantem (nominative fragrans) "sweet-smelling," present participle of fragrare "emit (a sweet) odor," from PIE root *bhrag- "to smell" (cognates: Middle High German bræhen "to smell," Middle Dutch bracke, Old High German braccho "hound, setter;" see brach).
fraidy-cat (n.) Look up fraidy-cat at Dictionary.com
"coward," by 1871, American English slang, from 'fraid, childish or dialectal (African, West Indies) pronunciation of afraid (by 1816), + cat.
frail (adj.) Look up frail at Dictionary.com
mid-14c., "morally weak," from Old French fraile "weak, frail, sickly, infirm" (Modern French frêle), from Latin fragilis "easily broken" (see fragility). Sense of "liable to break" is first recorded in English late 14c. The U.S. slang noun meaning "a woman" is attested from 1908.
frailty (n.) Look up frailty at Dictionary.com
mid-14c., from Old French fraileté "frailty, weakness," from Latin fragilitatem (nominative fragilitas), from fragilis "fragile" (see fragility). Related: Frailties.
fraktur (n.) Look up fraktur at Dictionary.com
German black-lettering, 1886, from German Fraktur, from Latin fractura (see fracture (n.)); so called from its angular, "broken" letters. The style was commonly used in German printing from c.1540. Sense often transferred to Pennsylvania German arts that incorporate the lettering.
framboise (n.) Look up framboise at Dictionary.com
1570s, from French framboise "raspberry" (12c.), usually explained as a corruption of Dutch braambezie (cognate with German brombeere "blackberry," literally "bramble-berry"). "But some French scholars doubt this" [OED].
frame (v.) Look up frame at Dictionary.com
Old English framian "to profit, be helpful, avail, benefit," from fram "active, vigorous, bold," originally "going forward," from fram "forward; from" (see from).

Influenced by related Old English fremman "help forward, promote, further, do, perform, accomplish," and by Old Norse fremja "to further, execute." Sense focused in Middle English from "make ready" (mid-13c.) to "prepare timber for building" (late 14c.). Meaning "compose, devise" is first attested 1540s.

The criminal slang sense of "blame an innocent person" (1920s) is probably from earlier sense of "plot in secret" (1900), perhaps ultimately from meaning "fabricate a story with evil intent," first attested 1510s. Related: Framed; framing.
frame (n.) Look up frame at Dictionary.com
c.1200, "profit, benefit;" mid-13c. "composition, plan," from frame (v.) and in part from Scandinavian (Old Norse frami "advancement"). In late 14c. it also meant "the rack."

Meaning "building" is from early 15c.; that of "border or case for a picture or pane of glass" is from c.1600. The meaning "established order, plan" and that of "human body" are both first recorded 1590s. Of bicycles, from 1871; of motor cars, from 1900. Frame of mind is from 1711. Frame of reference is 1897, from mechanics and graphing; the figurative sense is attested from 1924.
frame (adj.) Look up frame at Dictionary.com
(of buildings), "made of wood," 1790, American English, from frame (n.).
framework (n.) Look up framework at Dictionary.com
1640s, from frame (n.) + work (n.). Figurative sense is from 1816.
franc (n.) Look up franc at Dictionary.com
French coin, late 14c., from Medieval Latin Francorum Rex "King of the Franks," inscribed on gold coins first made during the reign of Jean le Bon (1350-64). An official monetary unit of France from 1795.
franc-tireur (n.) Look up franc-tireur at Dictionary.com
"sharpshooter of the irregular infantry," 1808, French, literally "free-shooter," from franc "free" (see frank) + tireur "shooter," from tirer "to draw, shoot" (see tirade). A term from the French Revolution.
Frances Look up Frances at Dictionary.com
fem. proper name, from French, from Old French Franceise (Modern French Françoise), fem. of Franceis (see Francis).
franchise (n.) Look up franchise at Dictionary.com
late 13c., from Old French franchise "freedom, exemption; right, privilege" (12c.), from variant stem of franc "free" (see frank (adj.)). Sense narrowed 18c. to "particular legal privilege," then "right to vote" (1790). Meaning "authorization by a company to sell its products or services" is from 1959.
franchise (v.) Look up franchise at Dictionary.com
late 14c., from Old French franchiss-, past participle stem of franchir "to free" (12c.), from franc (see frank (adj.)). Franchising is from 1570s; the commercial licensing sense is from 1966. Related: Franchisee; franchiser; franchisor.
Francis Look up Francis at Dictionary.com
masc. proper name, from French François, from Old French Franceis, from Late Latin Franciscus, literally "Frankish;" cognate with French and frank.
Franciscan Look up Franciscan at Dictionary.com
1590s, "friar of the order founded in 1209 by St. Francis (Medieval Latin Franciscus) of Assisi" (1182-1226). Also as an adjective.
Franco- Look up Franco- at Dictionary.com
word-forming element meaning "French," from Medieval Latin comb. form of Franci "the Franks," hence, by extension, "the French" (see Frank). Used in forming English compound words from early 18c.
Francophile (adj.) Look up Francophile at Dictionary.com
1875, from Franco- + -phile. "A newspaper word" [OED]. Its opposite, Francophobe, is recorded from 1890 (implied in Francophobic; Francophobia is from 1862).
Francophone (adj.) Look up Francophone at Dictionary.com
1900, from Franco- + -phone.
frangible (adj.) Look up frangible at Dictionary.com
early 15c., from Middle French frangible, from Medieval Latin frangibilis, from Latin frangere "to break" (see fraction).