fit (v.) Look up fit at Dictionary.com
"be suitable," probably from early 15c.; "to be the right shape," 1580s, from fit (adj.). Related: Fitted; fitting. Fitted sheets is attested from 1963.
fit (n.2) Look up fit at Dictionary.com
"paroxysm, sudden attack" (as of anger), 1540s, probably via Middle English sense of "painful, exciting experience" (early 14c.), from Old English fitt "conflict, struggle," of uncertain origin, with no clear cognates outside English. Perhaps ultimately cognate with fit (n.1) on notion of "to meet." Phrase by fits and starts first attested 1610s.
fit (adj.) Look up fit at Dictionary.com
"suited to the circumstances, proper," mid-15c., of unknown origin, perhaps from Middle English noun fit "an adversary of equal power" (mid-13c.), which is perhaps connected to fit (n.1). Related: Fitter; fittest. Survival of the fittest (1867) coined by H. Spencer.
fit (n.3) Look up fit at Dictionary.com
part of a poem, Old English fitt, of unknown origin.
fitful (adj.) Look up fitful at Dictionary.com
used once by Shakespeare ("Macbeth," 1605) in sense of "characterized by fits," then revived by Scott (1810) with a sense of "shifting, changing." From fit (n.2) + -ful. Related: Fitfully; fitfulness.
fitness (n.) Look up fitness at Dictionary.com
1570s, from fit (adj.) + -ness.
fitter (n.) Look up fitter at Dictionary.com
1650s, agent noun from fit (v.).
fitting Look up fitting at Dictionary.com
1530s (adj.); c.1600 (n.), from present participle of fit (v.).
fitz Look up fitz at Dictionary.com
Anglo-French fitz, from Old French fils, from Latin filius "son of" (see filial); used regularly in official rolls and hence the first element of many modern surnames; in later times used of illegitimate issue of royalty.
five (n.) Look up five at Dictionary.com
Old English fif, from Proto-Germanic *fimfe (cognates: Old Frisian and Old Saxon fif, Dutch vijf, Old Norse fimm, Old High German funf, Gothic fimf), from PIE *penkwe- (cognates: Sanskrit panca, Greek pente, Latin quinque, Old Church Slavonic peti, Lithuanian penke, Old Welsh pimp). The sound shift that removed the *-m- is a regular development involving Old English, Old Frisian, and Old Saxon (as in thought, from stem of think; couth from *kunthaz; us from *uns.

Slang five-finger discount "theft" is from 1966. Five o'clock shadow attested by 1937. The original five-year plan was 1928 in the U.S.S.R.
fivefold (adv.) Look up fivefold at Dictionary.com
Old English fiffeald; see five + -fold.
fiver (n.) Look up fiver at Dictionary.com
1843, "five-pound note," from five + -er.
fix (v.) Look up fix at Dictionary.com
late 14c., "set (one's eyes or mind) on something," probably from Old French *fixer, from fixe "fixed," from Latin fixus "fixed, fast, immovable, established, settled," past participle of figere "to fix, fasten," from PIE root *dhigw- "to stick, to fix."

Sense of "fasten, attach" is c.1400; that of "settle, assign" is pre-1500 and evolved into "adjust, arrange" (1660s), then "repair" (1737). Sense of "tamper with" (a fight, a jury, etc.) is 1790. As euphemism for "castrate a pet" it dates from 1930. Related: Fixed; fixedly (1590s); fixing.
fix (n.) Look up fix at Dictionary.com
"position from which it is difficult to move," 1809, American English, from fix (v.). Meaning "dose of narcotic" is from 1934, shortened from fix-up (1867, originally in reference to liquor).
fixable (adj.) Look up fixable at Dictionary.com
late 15c., from fix (v.) + -able.
fixate (v.) Look up fixate at Dictionary.com
1885, "to fix, make stable," from fix (v.) + -ate. Meaning "to gaze upon" is from 1889. Psychological sense is from 1926, originally in Freudian theory, in this case perhaps a back-formation from fixation. Related: Fixated; fixating.
fixation (n.) Look up fixation at Dictionary.com
late 14c., fixacion, an alchemical word, from Medieval Latin fixationem (nominative fixatio), noun of action from past participle stem of Latin fixare, frequentative of figere "to fix" (see fix (v.)). Used in the Freudian sense since 1910.
fixative (adj.) Look up fixative at Dictionary.com
1640s, from fix (v.) + -ative, suffix meaning "of or related to; tending to." As a noun, from 1870.
fixer (n.) Look up fixer at Dictionary.com
1849, of chemicals, etc.; 1885 as a person who "makes things right;" agent noun from fix (v.).
fixings (n.) Look up fixings at Dictionary.com
"apparatus," 1820, from present participle of fix (v.). American English sense of "food, garnishing" is attested from 1839.
fixity (n.) Look up fixity at Dictionary.com
1660s in physics; general use from 1791; see fix (v.) + -ity.
fixture (n.) Look up fixture at Dictionary.com
1590s, "act of fixing," perhaps from fix (v.) on model of mixture. Meaning "anything fixed or securely fastened" is from 1812.
fizgig (n.) Look up fizgig at Dictionary.com
"light, frivolous woman," 1520s, first element of uncertain origin, second element is Middle English gig "frivolous person" (see gig (n.1)).
fizz (v.) Look up fizz at Dictionary.com
1660s, of imitative origin. Related: Fizzed; fizzing. The noun is recorded from 1812; meaning "effervescent drink" is from 1864.
fizzle (v.) Look up fizzle at Dictionary.com
1530s, "to break wind without noise," probably altered from obsolete fist, from Middle English fisten "break wind" (see feisty) + frequentative suffix -le. Related: Fizzled; fizzling.

Noun sense of "failure, fiasco" is from 1846, originally U.S. college slang for "failure in an exam." Barnhart says it is "not considered as derived from the verb." The verb in this sense is from 1847.
fizzy (adj.) Look up fizzy at Dictionary.com
1885, from fizz + -y (2).
fjord (n.) Look up fjord at Dictionary.com
1670s, from Norwegian fiord, from Old Norse fjörðr, from North Germanic *ferthuz, from PIE *prtus, from *per- "going, passage" (see port (n.1)).
flab (n.) Look up flab at Dictionary.com
"fat, flabbiness," 1951, back-formation from flabby.
flabbergasted (adj.) Look up flabbergasted at Dictionary.com
1772, mentioned (with bored) in a magazine article as a new vogue word, perhaps from some dialect (in 1823 flabbergast was noted as a Sussex word), likely an arbitrary formation from flabby or flapper and aghast.
flabby (adj.) Look up flabby at Dictionary.com
1690s, variant of flappy, which is recorded in the sense of "softly fleshy" from 1590s; see flap. Related: Flabbily; flabbiness.
flaccid (adj.) Look up flaccid at Dictionary.com
1610s, from French flaccide or directly from Latin flaccidus "flabby," from flaccus "flabby, flap-eared," of uncertain origin (OED suggests it's imitative). Related: Flaccidly; flaccidity.
flack (n.) Look up flack at Dictionary.com
"publicity or press agent," 1945, also as a verb by that year, said to have been coined in show biz magazine "Variety" (but this is not the first attested use), supposedly from name of Gene Flack, a movie agent, but influenced by flak. There was a Gene Flack who was an advertising executive in the U.S. during the 1940s, but he seems to have sold principally biscuits, not movies.
flag (n.1) Look up flag at Dictionary.com
"cloth ensign," late 15c., now in all modern Germanic languages, but apparently first recorded in English, origin unknown, but likely connected with flag (v.) or else, like it, perhaps imitative. A less likely guess is that it is from the flag in flagstone on notion of being square and flat. U.S. Flag Day (1894) is in reference to the adopting of the Stars and Stripes by the Continental Congress on June 14, 1777.
flag (v.) Look up flag at Dictionary.com
1540s, "flap about loosely," perhaps a variant of Middle English flakken, flacken "to flap, flutter" (late 14c.), probably from Old Norse flakka "to flicker, flutter," perhaps imitative of something flapping lazily in the wind.

Sense of "go limp, droop" is first recorded 1610s. Meaning "to designate as someone who will not be served more liquor" is from 1980s, probably from use of flags to signal trains, etc., to halt, which led to the verb in this sense (1856, American English). Related: Flagged; flagging.
flag (n.2) Look up flag at Dictionary.com
"flat, split stone," c.1600, earlier "piece cut from turf or sod" (mid-15c.), from Old Norse flaga "stone slab," perhaps related to Old Norse flak (see flake (n.)).
flag (n.3) Look up flag at Dictionary.com
aquatic plant, late 14c., "reed, rush," perhaps from a Scandinavian source (compare Danish flæg "yellow iris") or Dutch flag; perhaps ultimately connected to flag (v.) on notion of "fluttering in the breeze."
flagellant (n.) Look up flagellant at Dictionary.com
late 16c., from Latin flagellantem (nominative flagellans), present participle of flagellare "to scourge, lash" (see flagellum).
flagellate (v.) Look up flagellate at Dictionary.com
1620s, from Latin flagellatus, past participle of flagellare "to scourge, lash" (see flagellum). Related: Flagellated; flagellating. An earlier verb for this was flagellen (mid-15c.).
flagellation (n.) Look up flagellation at Dictionary.com
early 15c., "the scourging of Christ," from French flagellation or directly from Latin flagellationem (nominative flagellatio) "a scourging," from past participle stem of flagellare (see flagellum).
flagellum (n.) Look up flagellum at Dictionary.com
1852, in reference to microbes, from Latin flagellum "whip, scourge," diminutive of flagrum "whip," from PIE root *bhlag- "to strike."
flagitious (adj.) Look up flagitious at Dictionary.com
"shamefully wicked, criminal," late 14c., from Old French flagicieux or directly from Latin flagitiosus "shameful, disgraceful, infamous," from flagitium "shameful act, passionate deed, disgraceful thing," related to flagrum "a whip, scourge, lash," flagitare "to demand importunately," from PIE root *bhlag- "to strike." Related: Flagitiously; flagitiousness.
flagon (n.) Look up flagon at Dictionary.com
mid-15c., from Middle French flacon, Old French flascon, from Late Latin flasconem (nominative flasco) "bottle" (see flask).
flagrance (n.) Look up flagrance at Dictionary.com
1610s, from French flagrance or directly from Latin flagrantia, noun of quality from flagrantem (see flagrant).
flagrant (adj.) Look up flagrant at Dictionary.com
c.1500, "resplendent," from Latin flagrantem (nominative flagrans) "burning, blazing, glowing," figuratively "glowing with passion, eager, vehement," present participle of flagrare "to burn, blaze, glow" from Latin root *flag-, corresponding to PIE *bhleg- "to shine, flash, burn" (cognates: Greek phlegein "to burn, scorch," Latin fulgere "to shine"), from root *bhel- (1) "to shine, flash, burn" (see bleach (v.)). Sense of "glaringly offensive" first recorded 1706, probably from common legalese phrase in flagrante delicto "red-handed," literally "with the crime still blazing." Related: Flagrantly.
flagship (n.) Look up flagship at Dictionary.com
1670s, ship bearing an admiral's flag, from flag (n.) + ship (n.). Figurative use by 1933.
flagstaff (n.) Look up flagstaff at Dictionary.com
1610s, from flag (n.) + staff (n.). The settlement in Arizona, U.S., so called for a July 4, 1876, celebration in which a large flag was flown from a tall tree.
flagstone (n.) Look up flagstone at Dictionary.com
1730, from flag (n.2) "flat, split stone" + stone (n.).
Flaherty Look up Flaherty at Dictionary.com
surname, Irish Flaithbheartach, literally "Bright-Ruler."
flail (n.) Look up flail at Dictionary.com
"implement for threshing grain," c.1100, perhaps from an unrecorded Old English *flegel, which probably represents West Germanic *flagil (cognates: Middle Dutch and Low German vlegel, Old High German flegel, German flegel), a borrowing of Late Latin flagellum "winnowing tool, flail," from Latin flagellum "whip" (see flagellum).
flail (v.) Look up flail at Dictionary.com
15c., from flail (n.); originally "to scourge;" sense of "to move like a flail" is from 1874. Related: Flailed; flailing.