education (n.)
1530s, "childrearing," also "the training of animals," from Middle French education (14c.) and directly from Latin educationem (nominative educatio), from past participle stem of educare (see educate). Originally of education in social codes and manners; meaning "systematic schooling and training for work" is from 1610s.
educational (adj.)
1650s, "due to education;" 1831, "pertaining to education;" from education + -al (1). Related: Educationally.
educationese (n.)
"the jargon of school administrators," 1966, from education + -ese.
educative (adj.)
1844, from Latin educat-, past participle stem of educare (see educate) + -ive.
educator (n.)
1560s, "one who nourishes or rears;" 1670s, "one who trains or instructs," from Latin educator (in classical Latin, "a foster father" as well as "a tutor"), agent noun from past participle stem of educare (see educate). Latin educatrix meant "a nurse."
educe (v.)
early 15c., in the literal sense, from Latin educere "to lead out, bring out" (of troops, ships, etc.; see educate). Meaning "to draw a conclusion from data" is from 1837.
educrat (n.)
1968, usually pejorative; first element from education, second from bureaucrat. Said to have been coined by Claude R. Kirk Jr. (b.1926), governor of Florida.
While political leaders and corporate CEOs, focusing as usual on the quarterly return, call for "workers for the new economy," their educational reforms are producing just that: students with a grab-bag of minor skills and competencies and minds that are sadly uneventful, incapable of genuine intellectual achievement and lacking any sense of continuity with the historical and cultural traditions of our society. Their world is small, bleak, and limited; their world will become ours. [David Solway, "The Turtle Hypodermic of Sickenpods," Quebec, 2000]
Edward
masc. proper name, from Old English Eadweard, literally "prosperity-guard," from ead "wealth, prosperity" + weard "guardian" (see ward (n.)). Among the 10 most popular names for boys born in the U.S. every year from 1895 to 1930.
Edwardian (adj.)
1861, in reference to the medieval English kings of that name; 1908 in the sense of "of the time or reign of Edward VII" (1901-10), and, since 1934, especially with reference to the men's clothing styles (as in teddy-boy, 1954, for which see Teddy). From Edward + -ian.
Edwin
masc. proper name, from Old English Ead-wine, literally "prosperity-friend."
eek
sound of a squeak of fear, by 1940.
eel (n.)
Old English æl, from Proto-Germanic *ælaz (cognates: Old Frisian -el, Middle Dutch ael, Dutch aal, Old Saxon and Old High German al, German Aal, Old Norse all), of unknown origin, with no certain cognates outside Germanic. Used figuratively for slipperiness from at least 1520s.
eeny
the children's counting-out rhyme is first attested 1855 as eeny meeny moany mite; form eene meenee mainee mo is attested from 1923. Another variation is eeny meeny tipty te.
eerie (adj.)
c.1300, "fearful, timid," north England and Scottish variant of Old English earg "cowardly, fearful," from Proto-Germanic *argaz (cognates: Old Frisian erg "evil, bad," Middle Dutch arch "bad," Dutch arg, Old High German arg "cowardly, worthless," German arg "bad, wicked," Old Norse argr "unmanly, voluptuous," Swedish arg "malicious").

Sense of "causing fear because of strangeness" is first attested 1792. Related: Eerily. Finnish arka "cowardly" is a Germanic loan-word.
eff
1943, euphemism for fuck, representing the sound of its first letter. Related: Effing.
effable (adj.)
1630s, from French effable, from Latin effabilis, from effari "to utter" (see ineffable). Now obsolete or archaic.
efface (v.)
late 15c., from Middle French effacer, from Old French esfacier (12c.) "to wipe out, destroy," literally "to remove the face," from es- "out" (see ex-) + face "appearance," from Latin facies "face" (see face (n.)). Related: Effaced; effacing. Compare deface.
effect (n.)
late 14c., "a result," from Old French efet (13c., Modern French effet) "result, execution, completion, ending," from Latin effectus "accomplishment, performance," from past participle stem of efficere "work out, accomplish," from ex- "out" (see ex-) + facere "to do" (see factitious).

Meaning "impression produced on the beholder" is from 1736. Sense in stage effect, sound effect, etc. first recorded 1881. The verb is from 1580s. Related: Effecting; effection.
effected (adj.)
"brought about," past participle adjective from effect (v.). Sometimes used erroneously for affected.
effective (adj.)
late 14c., from French effectif, from Latin effectivus "productive, effective," from effect-, stem of efficere (see effect (n.)). Effectively in the sense of "actually" is attested by 1650s. Related: Effectivity.
effectiveness (n.)
c.1600, from effective + -ness.
effects (n.)
"goods, property," 1704, plural of effect (n.).
effectual (adj.)
late 14c., Old French effectuel, from Late Latin effectualis, from Latin effectus "accomplishment, performance" (see effect (n.)). Used properly of actions (not agents) and with a sense "having the effect aimed at." Related: Effectually; effectuality.
effectuate (v.)
1570s, from French effectuer, from Latin effectus (see effect (n.)). Related: Effectuated; effectuating.
effeminacy (n.)
c.1600; see effeminate + -acy.
effeminate (adj.)
early 15c., from Latin effeminatus "womanish, effeminate," past participle of effeminare "make a woman of," from ex- "out" (see ex-) + femina "woman" (see feminine). Rarely used without reproach. Related: Effeminately.
effendi (n.)
Turkish title of respect, 1610s, from Turkish efendi, title of respect applied to professionals and officials, corruption of Greek authentes "lord, master" (in Modern Greek aphente; see authentic).
efferent (adj.)
1827, from Latin efferentem (nominative efferens), present participle of effere "to carry out or away, bring forth," from ef- (see ex-) + ferre "to bear, carry" (see infer).
effervesce (v.)
1702, from Latin effervescere (see effervescence). Related: Effervesced; effervescing.
effervescence (n.)
1650s, "the action of boiling up," from French effervescence (1640s), from Latin effervescentem, present participle of effervescere "to boil up, boil over," from ex- "out" (see ex-) + fervescere "begin to boil," from fervere "be hot, boil" (see brew). Figurative sense of "liveliness" is from 1748. Related: Effervescency.
effervescent (adj.)
1680s, from Latin effervescentem (nominative effervescens), present participle of effervescere (see effervescence). Meaning "exuberant" is from 1833.
effete (adj.)
1620s, from Latin effetus (usually in fem. effeta) "exhausted, unproductive, worn out (with bearing offspring), past bearing," literally "that has given birth," from a lost verb, *efferi, from ex- "out" (see ex-) + fetus "childbearing, offspring" (see fetus). Figurative use is earliest in English; literal use is rare. Sense of "exhausted" is 1660s; that of "intellectually or morally exhausted" (1790) led to "decadent" (19c.).
efficacious (adj.)
"sure to have the desired effect" (often of medicines), 1520s, from Latin efficaci-, stem of efficax (see efficacy) + -ous. Related: Efficaciously; efficaciousness.
efficacy (n.)
1520s, from Latin efficacia "efficacy, efficiency," from efficax (genitive efficacis) "powerful, effective," from stem of efficere "work out, accomplish" (see effect). Earlier in same sense was efficace (c.1200), from Old French eficace (14c.), from Latin efficacia; also efficacite (early 15c.), from Latin efficacitatem.
efficiency (n.)
1590s, "power to accomplish something," from Latin efficientia (from efficientem; see efficient) + -cy. In mechanics, "ratio of useful work done to energy expended," from 1858. Attested from 1952 as short for efficiency apartment (itself from 1930).
efficient (adj.)
"capable of producing the desired effect," late 14c., "making, producing immediate effect," from Old French efficient and directly from Latin efficientem (nominative efficiens) "effective, efficient, producing, active," present participle of efficere "work out, accomplish" (see effect). Meaning "productive, skilled" is from 1787. Related: Efficiently.
effigy (n.)
1530s, "image of a person," from Middle French effigie (13c.), from Latin effigies "copy or imitation of something, likeness," from or related to effingere "mold, fashion, portray," from ex- "out" (see ex-) + fingere "to form, shape" (see fiction). The Latin word was regarded as plural and the -s was lopped off by 18c. Specifically associated with burning, hanging, etc., at least since 1670s.
effleurage (n.)
1886, from French effleurage, from effleurer "to touch lightly."
effloresce (v.)
"to come into flower," 1775, from Latin efflorescere "to blossom, spring up, flourish, abound," from ex "out" (see ex-) + florescere "to blossom," from flos (see flora).
efflorescence (n.)
1620s, from French efflorescence, from Latin efflorescentem (nominative efflorescens), present participle of efflorescere (see effloresce).
efflorescent (adj.)
1818, from Latin efflorescentem (nominative efflorescens), present participle of efflorescere (see effloresce).
effluence (n.)
c.1600, from Late Latin effluentia, from Latin effluentem (nominative effluens) "flowing out," present participle of effluere "to flow out," from ex- "out" (see ex-) + fluere "to flow" (see fluent).
effluent (adj.)
mid-15c., from Latin effluentem (see effluence). As a noun, from 1859; meaning "liquid industrial waste" is from 1930.
effluvia (n.)
Latin plural of effluvium.
effluvium (n.)
1640s, from Latin effluvium "a flowing out," from effluere (see effluence).
efflux (n.)
1640s, from Latin effluxus, past participle of effluere (see effluence).
effort (n.)
late 15c., from Middle French effort, noun of action from Old French esforz "force, impetuosity, strength, power," back-formation from esforcier "force out, exert oneself," from Vulgar Latin *exfortiare "to show strength" (source of Italian sforza), from Latin ex- "out" (see ex-) + Latin fortis "strong" (see fort).
Effort is only effort when it begins to hurt. [Ortega y Gasset, 1949]
Related: Efforts.
effortless (adj.)
1801, "passive," from effort + -less. Meaning "easy" is from 1831. Related: Effortlessly; effortlessness.
effrontery (n.)
1715, from French effronterie, from effronté "shameless," from Old French esfronte "shameless, brazen," probably from Late Latin effrontem (nominative effrons) "barefaced," from Latin ex- "out" (see ex-) + frontem (nominative frons) "brow" (see front (n.)).

Latin frontus had a sense of "ability to blush," but the literal sense of effrontery often has been taken to be "putting forth the forehead." Forehead in Johnson's Dictionary (1755) has a secondary sense of "impudence; confidence; assurance; audaciousness; audacity."
effulgence (n.)
1660s, from Late Latin effulgentia (from Latin effulgentum; see effulgent) + -ce.