eviscerate (v.) Look up eviscerate at Dictionary.com
c.1600 (figurative); 1620s (literal), from Latin evisceratus, past participle of eviscerare "to disembowel," from assimilated form of ex- "out" (see ex-) + viscera "internal organs" (see viscera). Sometimes used 17c. in a figurative sense of "to bring out the deepest secrets of." Related: Eviscerated; eviscerating.
evisceration (n.) Look up evisceration at Dictionary.com
1620s, noun of action from eviscerate.
evitable (adj.) Look up evitable at Dictionary.com
c.1500, from Latin evitabilis "avoidable," from evitare "to shun, avoid" (see inevitable). In modern use, likely a back-formation from inevitable.
evocation (n.) Look up evocation at Dictionary.com
1570s, from Latin evocationem (nominative evocatio) "a calling forth, a calling from concealment," noun of action from past participle stem of evocare "call out, summon; call forth, rouse, appeal to," from assimilated form of ex- "out" (see ex-) + vocare "to call" (see voice (n.)).

Evocatio was used of the Roman custom of petitioning the gods of an enemy city to abandon it and come to Rome; it also was used to translate the Platonic Greek anamnesis "a calling up of knowledge acquired in a previous state of existence."
evocative (adj.) Look up evocative at Dictionary.com
1650s, "tending to call forth," from Late Latin evocativus "pertaining to summoning," from Latin evocatus, past participle of evocare "call out; rouse, summon" (see evocation).
evoke (v.) Look up evoke at Dictionary.com
1620s, from French évoquer or directly from Latin evocare "call out, rouse, summon" (see evocation). Often more or less with a sense of "calling spirits," or being called by them. Of feelings, memories, etc., by 1856. Related: Evoked; evokes; evoking.
evolution (n.) Look up evolution at Dictionary.com
1620s, "an opening of what was rolled up," from Latin evolutionem (nominative evolutio) "unrolling (of a book)," noun of action from past participle stem of evolvere "to unroll" (see evolve).

Used in medicine, mathematics, and general writing in various senses including "growth to maturity and development of an individual living thing" (1660s). Modern use in biology, of species, first attested 1832 in works of Scottish geologist Charles Lyell. Charles Darwin used the word in print once only, in the closing paragraph of "The Origin of Species" (1859), and preferred descent with modification, in part because evolution already had been used in the discarded 18c. homunculus theory of embryological development (first proposed under this name by Bonnet, 1762) and in part because it carried a sense of "progress" not present in Darwin's idea. But Victorian belief in progress prevailed (and the advantages of brevity), and Herbert Spencer and other biologists after Darwin popularized evolution.
evolutionary (adj.) Look up evolutionary at Dictionary.com
1846, from evolution + -ary.
evolutionist (n.) Look up evolutionist at Dictionary.com
1859, "one who accepts as true the biological theory of evolution," from evolution + -ist. Related: Evolutionism.
evolve (v.) Look up evolve at Dictionary.com
1640s, "to unfold, open out, expand," from Latin evolvere "to unroll, roll out, roll forth, unfold," especially of books; figuratively "to make clear, disclose; to produce, develop," from assimilated form of ex- "out" (see ex-) + volvere "to roll" (see volvox). Meaning "to develop by natural processes to a higher state" is from 1832. Related: Evolved; evolving.
ewe (n.) Look up ewe at Dictionary.com
Old English eowu "female sheep," fem. of eow "sheep," from Proto-Germanic *awi, genitive *awjoz (cognates: Old Saxon ewi, Old Frisian ei, Middle Dutch ooge, Dutch ooi, Old High German ouwi "sheep," Gothic aweþi "flock of sheep"), from PIE *owi- "sheep" (cognates: Sanskrit avih, Greek ois, Latin ovis, Lithuanian avis "sheep," Old Church Slavonic ovica "ewe," Old Irish oi "sheep," Welsh ewig "hind").
Ewen Look up Ewen at Dictionary.com
see Owen.
ewer (n.) Look up ewer at Dictionary.com
"water pitcher with a wide spout," early 14c., from Anglo-French *ewiere, Old French eviere "water pitcher," parallel form of aiguiere (Modern French aiguière), from fem. of Latin aquarius "of or for water," as a noun, "water-carrier" (see aquarium).
ewigkeit (n.) Look up ewigkeit at Dictionary.com
1877, from German, literally "eternity," from ewig "everlasting" (see eon).
ex (n.) Look up ex at Dictionary.com
1827, originally short for ex-Catholic; see ex-. Since 1929 as abbreviation for ex-wife, ex-husband, etc. Also used in some commercial compound words for "from, out of."
ex cathedra Look up ex cathedra at Dictionary.com
Latin, literally "from the (teacher's) chair," from ex "out of" (see ex-) + cathedra (see cathedral).
ex libris Look up ex libris at Dictionary.com
Latin, literally "out of the books (of)," from ex "out of" (see ex-) + ablative plural of liber "book" (see library).
ex nihilo Look up ex nihilo at Dictionary.com
Latin, literally "out of nothing," from ex "out of" (see ex-) + nihilo, ablative of nihil "nothing" (see nil).
ex officio Look up ex officio at Dictionary.com
Latin, "in discharge of one's duties," literally "out of duty," from ex "out of" (see ex-) + officio, ablative of officium "duty" (see office).
ex parte Look up ex parte at Dictionary.com
Latin legal term, "on the one side only," from ex "out of" (see ex-) + parte, ablative of pars "part, side" (see part (n.)).
ex post facto Look up ex post facto at Dictionary.com
from Medieval Latin ex postfacto, "from what is done afterwards." From facto, ablative of factum "deed, act" (see fact). Also see ex-, post-.
ex- Look up ex- at Dictionary.com
word-forming element, in English meaning usually "out of, from," but also "upwards, completely, deprive of, without," and "former;" from Latin ex "out of, from within," from PIE *eghs "out" (cognates: Gaulish ex-, Old Irish ess-, Old Church Slavonic izu, Russian iz). In some cases also from Greek cognate ex, ek. PIE *eghs had comparative form *eks-tero and superlative *eks-t(e)r-emo-. Often reduced to e- before -b-, -d-, -g-, consonantal -i-, -l-, -m-, -n-, -v- (as in elude, emerge, evaporate, etc.).
exacerbate (v.) Look up exacerbate at Dictionary.com
1650s, a back-formation from exacerbation or else from Latin exacerbatus, past participle of exacerbare "irritate, provoke." Related: Exacerbated; exacerbating.
exacerbation (n.) Look up exacerbation at Dictionary.com
c.1400, from Late Latin exacerbationem (nominative exacerbatio), noun of action from past participle stem of Latin exacerbare "exasperate, irritate, provoke," from ex- "thoroughly" (see ex-) + acerbus "harsh, bitter," from acer "sharp, keen" (see acrid).
exact (adj.) Look up exact at Dictionary.com
"precise, rigorous, accurate," 1530s, from Latin exactus "precise, accurate, highly finished," past participle adjective from exigere "demand, require, enforce," literally "to drive or force out," also "finish, measure," from ex- "out" (see ex-) + agere "drive, lead, act" (see act (n.)).
exact (v.) Look up exact at Dictionary.com
mid-15c., from Latin exactus, past participle of exigere "require, enforce, demand, collect (money);" see exact (adj.). Older in English than the adjective and retaining the literal sense of the Latin source. Related: Exacted; exacting.
exacta (n.) Look up exacta at Dictionary.com
type of horse-racing bet involving picking the first two horses in a race in order of finish, 1964, said to have originated in New York; from exact (adj.).
exacting (adj.) Look up exacting at Dictionary.com
"very demanding, severe in requirement," 1580s, present participle adjective from exact (v.).
exaction (n.) Look up exaction at Dictionary.com
late 14c., "action of demanding payment; imposition, requisitioning" of taxes, etc., from Old French exaccion and directly from Latin exactionem (nominative exactio) "a driving out; supervision; exaction; a tax, tribute, impost," noun of action from past participle stem of exigere (see exact (adj.)). Meaning "a tax, tribute, toll, fee," etc. is from mid-15c.
exactitude (n.) Look up exactitude at Dictionary.com
1734, from French exactitude (17c.), from exact, from Latin exactus (see exact (adj.)).
exactly (adv.) Look up exactly at Dictionary.com
1530s, from exact (adj.) + -ly (2). Elliptical use for "quite right" not recorded before 1869.
exactness (n.) Look up exactness at Dictionary.com
1560s, "perfection," from exact (adj.) + -ness. Meaning "precision" is 1640s.
exaggerate (v.) Look up exaggerate at Dictionary.com
1530s, "to pile up, accumulate," from Latin exaggeratus, past participle of exaggerare "heighten, amplify, magnify," literally "to heap, pile, load, fill," from ex- "thoroughly" (see ex-) + aggerare "heap up, accumulate," figuratively "amplify, magnify," from agger (genitive aggeris) "heap," from aggerere "bring together, carry toward," from assimilated form of ad- "to, toward" (see ad-) + gerere "carry" (see gest). Sense of "overstate" first recorded in English 1560s. Related: Exaggerated; exaggerating.
exaggeration (n.) Look up exaggeration at Dictionary.com
1560s, from Latin exaggerationem (nominative exaggeratio) "elevation, exaltation" (figurative), noun of action from past participle stem of exaggerare "amplify, magnify," literally "heap up" (see exaggerate).
exalt (v.) Look up exalt at Dictionary.com
late 14c., from Old French exalter (10c.), from Latin exaltare "raise, elevate," from ex- "out, up" (see ex-) + altus "high" (see old). Related: Exalted; exalting.
exaltation (n.) Look up exaltation at Dictionary.com
late 14c, from Old French exaltacion "enhancement, elevation," from Late Latin exaltationem (nominative exaltatio) "elevation, pride," noun of action from past participle stem of exaltare "to raise, elevate" (see exalt).
exam (n.) Look up exam at Dictionary.com
college student slang shortened form of examination, 1848.
examination (n.) Look up examination at Dictionary.com
late 14c., "action of testing or judging; judicial inquiry," from Old French examinacion, from Latin examinationem (nominative examinatio), noun of action from past participle stem of examinare (see examine). Sense of "test of knowledge" is attested from 1610s.
examine (v.) Look up examine at Dictionary.com
c.1300, from Old French examiner "interrogate, question, torture," from Latin examinare "to test or try; weigh, consider, ponder," from examen "a means of weighing or testing," probably ultimately from exigere "weigh accurately" (see exact (adj.)). Related: Examined; examining.
examiner (n.) Look up examiner at Dictionary.com
early 14c., examinour, agent noun from examine.
example (n.) Look up example at Dictionary.com
late 14c., partial re-Latinization of earlier essample, asaumple (mid-13c.), from Old French essemple "sample, model, example, precedent, cautionary tale," from Latin exemplum "a sample," literally "that which is taken out," from eximere "take out, remove" (see exempt (adj.)). Oldest English senses are of "behavior" and "punishment."
exanimate (adj.) Look up exanimate at Dictionary.com
1530s, from Latin exanimatus "lifeless, dead," past participle of exanimare "to deprive of air or breath; tire, fatigue; to deprive of life; to terrify," from ex- (see ex-) + animare (see animate (v.)).
exarch (n.) Look up exarch at Dictionary.com
from Late Latin exarchus, from Greek exarkhos, from ex (see ex-) + arkhos "leader, chief, ruler" (see archon).
exasperate (v.) Look up exasperate at Dictionary.com
1530s, from Latin exasperatus, past participle of exasperare "roughen, irritate, provoke," from ex- "thoroughly" (see ex-) + asper "rough" (see asperity). Related: Exasperated; exasperating.
exasperation (n.) Look up exasperation at Dictionary.com
1540s, from Latin exasperationem (nominative exasperatio), noun of action from past participle stem of exasperare (see exasperate).
Excalibur (n.) Look up Excalibur at Dictionary.com
King Arthur's sword, c.1300, from Old French Escalibor, corruption of Caliburn, in Geoffrey of Monmouth (c.1140) Caliburnus, apparently from Welsh Caledvwlch probably a variant of the legendary Irish sword name Caladbolg which might mean literally "hard-belly," i.e. "voracious." For first element, see callus; for second, see belly (n.).
excavate (v.) Look up excavate at Dictionary.com
1590s, from Latin excavatus, past participle of excavare "to hollow out," from ex- "out" (see ex-) + cavare "to hollow, hollow out," from cavus "cave" (see cave (n.)). Related: Excavated; excavating.
excavation (n.) Look up excavation at Dictionary.com
1610s, "action of excavating," from Latin excavationem (nominative excavatio) "a hollowing out," noun of action from past participle stem of excavare (see excavate).
exceed (v.) Look up exceed at Dictionary.com
late 14c., from Old French exceder (14c.) "exceed, surpass, go too far," from Latin excedere "depart, go beyond, be in excess, surpass," from ex- "out" (see ex-) + cedere "go, yield" (see cede). Related: Exceeded; exceeding. Exceedingly (late 15c.) means "very greatly or very much;" excessively (mid-15c.) means "too greatly or too much."
excel (v.) Look up excel at Dictionary.com
c.1400, from Latin excellere "to rise, surpass, be eminent," from ex- "out from" (see ex-) + -cellere "rise high, tower," related to celsus "high, lofty, great," from PIE root *kel- "to rise, be elevated" (see hill). Related: Excelled; excelling.