committee (n.) Look up committee at Dictionary.com
1620s, from commit + -ee, or else a revival of Anglo-French commite, past participle of commettre "to commit," from Latin committere "to unite, connect" (see commit). Originally "person to whom something is committed" (late 15c.); from 17c. in reference to a body of such people.
commode (n.) Look up commode at Dictionary.com
1786, "chest of drawers," earlier (1680s) name of a type of fashionable ladies' headdress, from French commode, noun use of adjective meaning "convenient, suitable," from Latin commodus "proper, fit, appropriate, convenient, satisfactory," from com-, here as an intensive prefix (see com-), + modus "measure, manner" (from PIE root *med- "take appropriate measures"). Meaning "chair housing a chamber pot" first attested 1851 from notion of "convenience."
commodification (n.) Look up commodification at Dictionary.com
1968, from the stem of commodity + -fication "a making or causing." Originally in Marxist political theory, "the assignment of a market value," often to some quality or material the user of the word feels would be better without it.
commodify (v.) Look up commodify at Dictionary.com
1971, back-formation from commodification. Related: Commodified; commodifying.
commodious (adj.) Look up commodious at Dictionary.com
early 15c., "beneficial, convenient," from Medieval Latin commodiosus "convenient, useful," from Latin commodus "proper, fit, appropriate, convenient, satisfactory" (see commode). Meaning "roomy, spacious" first attested 1550s. Related: Commodiously; commodiousness.
commoditization (n.) Look up commoditization at Dictionary.com
1965, from commodity + -ization; the businessman's word; the Marxist's is commodification.
commodity (n.) Look up commodity at Dictionary.com
early 15c., "benefit, profit, welfare;" later "a convenient or useful product," from Middle French commodité "benefit, profit," from Latin commoditatem (nominative commoditas) "fitness, adaptation, convenience, advantage," from commodus "suitable, convenient" (see commode). General sense "property possession" is from c. 1500.
commodore (n.) Look up commodore at Dictionary.com
1690s, probably via Dutch kommandeur from French commandeur, from Old French comandeor (see commander). In U.S. Navy, above a captain, below a rear-admiral.
common (n.) Look up common at Dictionary.com
late 15c., "land held in common," from common (adj.). Commons "the third estate of the English people as represented in Parliament," is from late 14c. Latin communis "common, general" (adj.) also served as a noun meaning "common property, state, commonwealth."
common (adj.) Look up common at Dictionary.com
c. 1300, "belonging to all, general," from Old French comun "common, general, free, open, public" (9c., Modern French commun), from Latin communis "in common, public, shared by all or many; general, not specific; familiar, not pretentious," from PIE *ko-moin-i- "held in common," compound adjective formed from *ko- "together" + *moi-n-, suffixed form of root *mei- (1) "to change, go, move," hence literally "shared by all."

Second element of the compound also is the source of Latin munia "duties, public duties, functions," those related to munia "office." Perhaps reinforced in Old French by the Germanic form of PIE *ko-moin-i- (compare Old English gemæne "common, public, general, universal;" see mean (adj.)), which came to French via Frankish.

Used disparagingly of women and criminals since c. 1300. Common pleas is 13c., from Anglo-French communs plets, hearing civil actions by one subject against another as opposed to pleas of the crown. Common prayer is contrasted with private prayer. Common stock is attested from 1888.
common good (n.) Look up common good at Dictionary.com
late 14c., translating Latin bonum publicum "the common weal."
common law (n.) Look up common law at Dictionary.com
mid-14c., "the customary and unwritten laws of England as embodied in commentaries and old cases" (see common (adj.)), as opposed to statute law. Phrase common law marriage is attested from 1909.
common sense (n.) Look up common sense at Dictionary.com
14c., originally the power of uniting mentally the impressions conveyed by the five physical senses, thus "ordinary understanding, without which one is foolish or insane" (Latin sensus communis, Greek koine aisthesis); meaning "good sense" is from 1726. Also, as an adjective, commonsense.
commonality (n.) Look up commonality at Dictionary.com
late 14c., "a community," from common (adj.), as if from Latin *communalitas. A respelling of commonalty (late 13c.). Meaning "the common people" is attested from 1580s; that of "state or quality of being shared" is from 1954.
commoner (n.) Look up commoner at Dictionary.com
early 14c. (in commoners), from common (adj.).
commonly (adv.) Look up commonly at Dictionary.com
c. 1300, "in a way common to all," also "common to all;" also "usually," from common (adj.) + -ly (2).
commonplace (n.) Look up commonplace at Dictionary.com
1540s, "a statement generally accepted," literal translation of Latin locus communis, from Greek koinos topos "general topic." See common (adj.) + place (n.). The adjectival sense of "having nothing original" dates from c. 1600.
commonsensical (adj.) Look up commonsensical at Dictionary.com
1860, from common sense, with ending as in nonsensical, etc.
commonwealth (n.) Look up commonwealth at Dictionary.com
late 15c., "public welfare, general good," from common (adj.) + wealth (n.); meaning "the state" is attested from 1510s; applied specifically to the government of England in the period 1649-1660.
commotion (n.) Look up commotion at Dictionary.com
late 14c., from Middle French commocion "violent motion, agitation" (12c., Modern French commotion), from Latin commotionem (nominative commotio) "violent motion, agitation," noun of action from past participle stem of commovere "to move, disturb," from com "with, together," perhaps here "thoroughly" (see com-) + movere "to move" (from PIE root *meue- "to push away").
communal (adj.) Look up communal at Dictionary.com
1811 in reference to communes; 1843 in reference to communities, from French communal (Old French comunal, 12c.), from Late Latin communalis, from communa (see commune (n.)).
communalism (n.) Look up communalism at Dictionary.com
1871 (in reference to Paris), from communal + -ism.
commune (n.) Look up commune at Dictionary.com
1792, from French commune "small territorial divisions set up after the Revolution," from Middle French commune "free city, group of citizens" (12c.), from Medieval Latin communia, literally "that which is common," noun use of neuter plural of Latin adjective communis "common, general" (see common (adj.)). The Commune of Paris usurped the government during the Reign of Terror. The word later was applied to a government on communalistic principles set up in Paris in 1871. Adherents of the 1871 government were Communards.
commune (v.) Look up commune at Dictionary.com
c. 1300, "have dealings with," from Old French comuner "to make common, share" (10c., Modern French communier), from comun "common, general, free, open, public" (see common (adj.)). Meaning "to talk intimately" is late 14c. Related: Communed; communing.
communicable (adj.) Look up communicable at Dictionary.com
late 14c., from Old French communicable, from Late Latin communicabilis, from Latin communicare "to share, communicate" (see communication).
communicate (v.) Look up communicate at Dictionary.com
1520s, "to impart" (information, etc.), from Latin communicatus, past participle of communicare "to share, communicate, impart, inform," literally "to make common," related to communis "common, public, general" (see common (adj.)). Meaning "to share, transmit" (diseases, etc.) is from 1530s. Related: Communicated; communicating.
communication (n.) Look up communication at Dictionary.com
late 14c., from Old French comunicacion (14c., Modern French communication), from Latin communicationem (nominative communicatio), noun of action from past participle stem of communicare "to share, divide out; communicate, impart, inform; join, unite, participate in," literally "to make common," related to communis "common, public, general" (see common (adj.)).
communicative (adj.) Look up communicative at Dictionary.com
late 14c., "that communicates," from French communicatif, from Latin communicat-, past participle stem of communicare "to share, communicate, impart, inform" (see communication). Meaning "talkative" is recorded from 1650s.
communicator (n.) Look up communicator at Dictionary.com
1660s, from Latin communicator, agent noun from communicare "to share, communicate" (see communication).
communion (n.) Look up communion at Dictionary.com
late 14c., from Old French comunion "community, communion" (12c.), from Latin communionem (nominative communio) "fellowship, mutual participation, a sharing," used in Late Latin ecclesiastical language for "participation in the sacrament," from communis "common, general" (see common (adj.)). Used by Augustine, in belief that the word was derived from com- "with, together" + unus "oneness, union."
communique (n.) Look up communique at Dictionary.com
1852, from French communiqué, originally past participle of communiquer "to communicate" (14c.), from Latin communicare "impart, inform" (see communication). Originally the heading of official statements from the French government. Better, if it must be used in English, to print it with the accent.
communism (n.) Look up communism at Dictionary.com
"social system based on collective ownership," 1843, from French communisme (c. 1840), from commun (Old French comun "common, general, free, open, public;" see common (adj.)) + -isme (see -ism). Originally a theory of society; as name of a political system, 1850, a translation of German Kommunismus (itself from French), in Marx and Engels' "Manifesto of the Communist Party." Compare communist. In some cases in early and mid-20c., a term of abuse implying anti-social criminality without regard to political theory.
Each [i.e. socialism, communism, anarchism] stands for a state of things, or a striving after it, that differs much from that which we know; & for many of us, especially those who are comfortably at home in the world as it is, they have consequently come to be the positive, comparative, & superlative, distinguished not in kind but in degree only, of the terms of abuse applicable to those who would disturb our peace. [Fowler]
communist Look up communist at Dictionary.com
1841, as both a noun and adjective, from French communiste, from commun (Old French comun "common, general, free, open, public;" see common (adj.)) + -iste (see -ist). First attested in writing by John Goodwin Barmby (1820-1881), British Owenite and utopian socialist who founded the London Communist Propaganda Society in 1841. Main modern sense emerged after publication of Communist Manifesto ("Manifest der Kommunistischen Partei") in 1848. Shortened form Commie attested from 1940. Related: Communistic.
communitarian (n.) Look up communitarian at Dictionary.com
1841, "member of a commune," from community + ending from utilitarian, etc. The adjective is attested from 1909.
community (n.) Look up community at Dictionary.com
late 14c., from Old French comunité "community, commonness, everybody" (Modern French communauté), from Latin communitatem (nominative communitas) "community, society, fellowship, friendly intercourse; courtesy, condescension, affability," from communis "common, public, general, shared by all or many" (see common (adj.)). Latin communitatem "was merely a noun of quality ... meaning 'fellowship, community of relations or feelings,' but in med.L. it was, like universitas, used concretely in the sense of 'a body of fellows or fellow-townsmen' " [OED].

An Old English word for "community" was gemænscipe "community, fellowship, union, common ownership," from mæne "common, public, general," probably composed from the same PIE roots as communis. Community service as a criminal sentence is recorded from 1972, American English. Community college is recorded from 1959.
commutation (n.) Look up commutation at Dictionary.com
mid-15c., from Old French commutacion "change, transformation, exchange, barter" (13c., Modern French commutation), from Latin commutationem (nominative commutatio) "a change, alteration," noun of action from past participle stem of commutare "to change, alter entirely" (see commute (v.)).
commutative (adj.) Look up commutative at Dictionary.com
1530s, from Medieval Latin commutativus, from Latin commutat-, past participle stem of commutare (see commute (v.)).
commutator (n.) Look up commutator at Dictionary.com
1839, agent noun in Latin form from Latin commutare (see commute (v.)).
commute (v.) Look up commute at Dictionary.com
mid-15c., "to change, transform," from Latin commutare "to often change, to change altogether," from com-, intensive prefix (see com-), + mutare "to change" (from PIE root *mei- (1) "to change, go, move"). Sense of "make less severe" is 1630s. Sense of "go back and forth to work" is 1889, from commutation ticket "season pass" (on a railroad, streetcar line, etc.), from commute in its sense of "to change one kind of payment into another" (1795), especially "to combine a number of payments into a single one." Related: Commuted; commuting.
commuter (n.) Look up commuter at Dictionary.com
1865, American English, "holder of a commutation ticket," agent noun from commute (v.).
Como Look up Como at Dictionary.com
lake in Italy, named for the town along its shore, which is Roman Comum, from Celtic cumba "valley" (compare coomb). Its ancient name was Lacus Larius; Lacus Comacinus begins to appear 4c. It is associated with Virgil and the two Plinys.
comorbidity (n.) Look up comorbidity at Dictionary.com
1985, from co- "along with" + morbidity "diseased condition." Comorbid (adj.) is a 1990 back-formation.
comp (n.) Look up comp at Dictionary.com
"complimentary ticket," 1885, short for complimentary. Meaning "nonpaying guest" is attested by 1930s; generalized to "anything given free" by 1960s. As a verb, by 1974. Related: Comped; comping. As a shortening of compensation (especially worker's/workman's) it was in use by 1970s.
compact (n.2) Look up compact at Dictionary.com
"make-up case," 1921, from compact (adj.), based on its containing compacted face powder.
compact (v.) Look up compact at Dictionary.com
early 15c., from Latin compactus, past participle of compingere "to fasten together" (see compact (adj.)). Related: Compacted; compacting.
compact (adj.) Look up compact at Dictionary.com
late 14c., from Middle French compact (14c.) or directly from Latin compactus "concentrated," past participle of compingere "to fasten together, construct," from com "with, together" (see com-) + pangere "to fix, fasten" (from PIE root *pag- "to fasten"). Compact car is 1960. Compact disc is from 1979.
compact (n.1) Look up compact at Dictionary.com
"agreement," 1590s, from Latin compactum "agreement," noun use of neuter past participle of compacisci "come to agreement," from com "with, together" (see com-) + pacisci "to covenant, contract" (from PIE root *pag- "to fasten").
compaction (n.) Look up compaction at Dictionary.com
late 14c., from Old French compaction, from Latin compactionem (nominative compactio) "a putting or joining together," noun of action from past participle stem of compingere (see compact (adj.)).
compadre (n.) Look up compadre at Dictionary.com
"companion," 1834, American English, from Spanish compadre "godfather," hence "benefactor, friend," from Medieval Latin compater, from com "with, together" (see com-) + pater "father" (see father (n.). Compare compere, also gossip (n.).
companion (n.) Look up companion at Dictionary.com
c. 1300, from Old French compagnon "fellow, mate, friend, partner" (12c.), from Late Latin companionem (nominative companio), literally "bread fellow, messmate," from Latin com "with, together" (see com-) + panis "bread," from PIE root *pa- "to feed."

Found first in 6c. Frankish Lex Salica, and probably a translation of a Germanic word (compare Gothic gahlaiba "messmate," from hlaib "loaf of bread"). Replaced Old English gefera "traveling companion," from faran "go, fare."