candid (adj.) Look up candid at Dictionary.com
1620s, "white," from Latin candidum "white; pure; sincere, honest, upright," from candere "to shine," from PIE root *kand- "to glow, to shine" (see candle). In English, metaphoric extension to "frank" first recorded 1670s (compare French candide "open, frank, ingenuous, sincere"). Of photography, 1929. Related: Candidly; candidness.
candidacy (n.) Look up candidacy at Dictionary.com
1822; see candidate + -cy.
candidate (n.) Look up candidate at Dictionary.com
c.1600s, from Latin candidatus "one aspiring to office," originally "white-robed," past participle of candidare "to make white or bright," from candidus (see candid). Office-seekers in ancient Rome wore white togas.
candied (adj.) Look up candied at Dictionary.com
c.1600, past participle adjective from candy (v.).
candle (n.) Look up candle at Dictionary.com
Old English candel "lamp, lantern, candle," an early ecclesiastical borrowing from Latin candela "a light, torch, candle made of tallow or wax," from candere "to shine," from PIE root *kand- "to glow, to shine, to shoot out light" (cognates: Sanskrit cand- "to give light, shine," candra- "shining, glowing, moon;" Greek kandaros "coal;" Welsh cann "white;" Middle Irish condud "fuel").

Candles were unknown in ancient Greece (where oil lamps sufficed), but common from early times among Romans and Etruscans. Candles on birthday cakes seems to have been originally a German custom. To hold a candle to originally meant "to help in a subordinate capacity," from the notion of an assistant or apprentice holding a candle for light while the master works (compare Old English taporberend "acolyte"). To burn the candle at both ends is recorded from 1730.
candlelight (n.) Look up candlelight at Dictionary.com
Old English candelleoht; from candle + light (n.).
Candlemass Look up Candlemass at Dictionary.com
Old English candelmæsse (from candle + mass (n.2)), feast of the purification of the Virgin Mary (Feb. 2), celebrated with many candles, corresponding to Celtic pagan Imbolc.
candlestick (n.) Look up candlestick at Dictionary.com
Old English candelsticca; see candle + stick (n.).
candor (n.) Look up candor at Dictionary.com
"openness of mind, impartiality, frankness," c.1600, from Latin candor "purity, openness," originally "whiteness," from candere "to shine, to be white" (see candle). Borrowed earlier in English (c.1500) with the Latin literal sense "extreme whiteness."
candour (n.) Look up candour at Dictionary.com
chiefly British English spelling of candor (q.v.); for spelling, see -or.
candy (n.) Look up candy at Dictionary.com
late 13c., "crystalized sugar," from Old French çucre candi "sugar candy," ultimately from Arabic qandi, from Persian qand "cane sugar," probably from Sanskrit khanda "piece (of sugar)," perhaps from Dravidian (compare Tamil kantu "candy," kattu "to harden, condense").
candy (v.) Look up candy at Dictionary.com
1530s, from candy (n.). Related: Candied; candying.
candy-striper (n.) Look up candy-striper at Dictionary.com
young female volunteer nurse at a hospital, by 1962, so called from the pink-striped design of her uniform, similar to patterns on peppermint candy.
candyass Look up candyass at Dictionary.com
also candy-ass, 1961, from candy (n.) + ass (n.2). Perhaps originally U.S. military.
cane (n.) Look up cane at Dictionary.com
late 14c., from Old French cane "reed, cane, spear" (13c., Modern French canne), from Latin canna "reed, cane," from Greek kanna, perhaps from Assyrian qanu "tube, reed" (compare Hebrew qaneh, Arabic qanah "reed"), from Sumerian gin "reed." But Tucker finds this borrowing "needless" and proposes a native Indo-European formation from a root meaning "to bind, bend." Sense of "walking stick" in English is 1580s.
cane (v.) Look up cane at Dictionary.com
"to beat with a walking stick," 1660s, from cane (n.). Related: Caned; caning.
canebreak (n.) Look up canebreak at Dictionary.com
1770, American English, from cane (n.) + break (n.).
Canfield (n.) Look up Canfield at Dictionary.com
type of solitaire, 1912, from U.S. gambler J.A. Canfield (1855-1914).
canicular (adj.) Look up canicular at Dictionary.com
late 14c., in reference to the "dog days," from Latin canicularis "pertaining to the dog days," from canicula "little dog," also "the Dog Star," diminutive of canis (see canine). Also see heliacal; Sirius. In literal use ("pertaining to a dog") historically only as attempt at humor.
canid (n.) Look up canid at Dictionary.com
member of the Canidae family (dogs, wolves, foxes, jackals), 1889, from Modern Latin Canidae, from Latin canis "dog" (see canine (n.)) + -idae.
canine (n.) Look up canine at Dictionary.com
"pointed tooth," late 14c., from Latin caninus "of the dog," genitive of canis "dog" (source of Italian cane, French chien), from PIE root *kwon- "dog" (cognates: Greek kyon, Old English hund, Old High German hunt, Old Irish cu, Welsh ci, Sanskrit svan-, Avestan spa, Russian sobaka (apparently from an Iranian source, such as Median spaka), Armenian shun, Lithuanian šuo). The noun meaning "dog" is first recorded 1869.
canine (adj.) Look up canine at Dictionary.com
c.1600, of teeth, from canine (n.) or Latin caninus. Meaning "pertaining to a dog or dogs" is from 1620s.
canister (n.) Look up canister at Dictionary.com
late 15c., "basket," from Latin canistrum "wicker basket" for bread, fruit, flowers, etc., from Greek kanystron "basket made from reed," from kanna (see cane (n.)). It came to mean "metal receptacle" (1711) through influence of can (n.). As short for canister shot, it is attested from 1801, so called for its casing.
canker (n.) Look up canker at Dictionary.com
late Old English cancer "spreading ulcer, cancerous tumor," from Latin cancer "malignant tumor," literally "crab" (see cancer); influenced in Middle English by Old North French cancre "canker, sore, abscess" (Old French chancre, Modern French chancre). The word was the common one for "cancer" until c.1700. Also used since 15c. of caterpillars and insect larvae that eat plant buds and leaves. As a verb from late 14c. Related: Cankered; cankerous. Canker blossom is recorded from 1580s.
cannabis (n.) Look up cannabis at Dictionary.com
1798, "common hemp," from Cannabis, Modern Latin plant genus named (1728), from Greek kannabis "hemp," a Scythian or Thracian word. Also source of Armenian kanap', Albanian kanep, Russian konoplja, Persian kanab, Lithuanian kanapes "hemp," and English canvas and possibly hemp. In reference to use of the plant parts as an intoxicant, from 1848. Related: Cannabic.
canned (adj.) Look up canned at Dictionary.com
1859, "put up in a can," past participle adjective from can (v.2). Figuratively, of music, from 1904, originally a contemptuous term (associated with John Philip Sousa) for music played by automatic instruments.
cannery (n.) Look up cannery at Dictionary.com
1879, from can (v.2) + -ery.
Cannes Look up Cannes at Dictionary.com
city on the French Riviera, perhaps from a pre-Indo-European word *kan, meaning "height." The film festival dates from 1946.
cannibal (n.) Look up cannibal at Dictionary.com
"human that eats human flesh," 1550s, from Spanish canibal, caribal "a savage, cannibal," from Caniba, Christopher Columbus' rendition of the Caribs' name for themselves (see Caribbean). The natives were believed to be anthropophagites. Columbus, seeking evidence that he was in Asia, thought the name meant the natives were subjects of the Great Khan. Shakespeare's Caliban (in "The Tempest") is from a version of this word, with -n- and -l- interchanged, found in Hakluyt's "Voyages" (1599). The Spanish word had reached French by 1515. Used of animals from 1796. An Old English word for "cannibal" was selfæta.
cannibalism (n.) Look up cannibalism at Dictionary.com
1796, from cannibal + -ism. Perhaps from French cannibalisme, from the same year.
cannibalistic (adj.) Look up cannibalistic at Dictionary.com
1840, from cannibal + -istic. Elder but failing to flourish were cannibalic, cannibalish (both from 1824).
cannibalization (n.) Look up cannibalization at Dictionary.com
by 1907, noun of action from cannibalize.
cannibalize (v.) Look up cannibalize at Dictionary.com
1798 (in Burke's memoirs), figurative, and meaning "be perverted into cannibalism," from cannibal + -ize. Meaning "take parts from one construction and use them in another" is from 1943, originally of military equipment. Related: Cannibalized; cannibalizing.
cannister (n.) Look up cannister at Dictionary.com
obsolete form of canister.
cannon (n.) Look up cannon at Dictionary.com
c.1400, "tube for projectiles," from Anglo-French canon, Old French canon (14c.), from Italian cannone "large tube, barrel," augmentative of Latin canna "reed, tube" (see cane (n.)). Meaning "large ordnance piece," the main modern sense, is from 1520s. Spelling not differentiated from canon till c.1800. Cannon fodder (1891) translates German kanonenfutter (compare Shakespeare's food for powder in "I Hen. IV").
cannon-ball (n.) Look up cannon-ball at Dictionary.com
also cannon ball, 1660s, from cannon (n.) + ball (n.1). As a type of dive, from 1905.
cannon-shot (n.) Look up cannon-shot at Dictionary.com
"distance a cannon will throw a ball," 1570s, from cannon (n.) + shot (n.).
cannonade (n.) Look up cannonade at Dictionary.com
"discharge of artillery," 1650s, from cannon + -ade. As a verb, from 1660s. Compare French canonnade (16c.), Italian cannonata. Related: Cannonaded; cannonading.
cannot (v.) Look up cannot at Dictionary.com
c.1400, from can (v.1) + not. Old English expressed the notion by ne cunnan.
cannula (n.) Look up cannula at Dictionary.com
1680s in surgical sense, from Latin cannula "small reed or pipe," diminutive of canna "reed, pipe" (see cane (n.)).
canny (adj.) Look up canny at Dictionary.com
1630s, Scottish and northern English formation from can (v.1) in its sense of "know how to," + -y (2). "Knowing," hence, "careful." A doublet of cunning that flowed into distinct senses. Often used superciliously of Scots by their southern neighbors (and their American cousins).
The Canny Scot is so well known as scarcely to require description. He carries caution, cunning, and selfishness to excess. Deceitful when a purpose is to be accomplished, he is not habitually deceitful. One thing he never loses sight of--his own interest. But of his own interest he is not the most enlightened judge. ["The Natural History of Scotsmen," in "The Argosy," December 1865]
Related: Cannily; canniness.
canoe (n.) Look up canoe at Dictionary.com
1550s, originally in a West Indian context, from Spanish canoa, a term used by Columbus, from Arawakan (Haiti) canaoua. Extended to rough-made or dugout boats generally. Early variants in English included cano, canow, canoa, etc., before spelling settled down c.1600.
canoe (v.) Look up canoe at Dictionary.com
1842, from canoe (n.). Related: Canoed; canoing.
canoeing (n.) Look up canoeing at Dictionary.com
1870, verbal noun from canoe (v.). Related: Canoeist.
canola (n.) Look up canola at Dictionary.com
"rapeseed," a euphemistic name coined 1978, supposedly involving Canada, where it was developed, and the root of oil (n.).
canon (n.1) Look up canon at Dictionary.com
"church law," Old English canon, from Old French canon or directly from Late Latin canon "Church law," in classical Latin, "measuring line, rule," from Greek kanon "any straight rod or bar; rule; standard of excellence," perhaps from kanna "reed" (see cane (n.)). Taken in ecclesiastical sense for "decree of the Church." General sense of "standard of judging" is from c.1600. Related: Canonicity.
canon (n.2) Look up canon at Dictionary.com
"clergyman," c.1200, from Anglo-French canun, from Old North French canonie (Modern French chanoine), from Church Latin canonicus "clergyman living under a rule," noun use of Latin adjective canonicus "according to rule" (in ecclesiastical use, "pertaining to the canon"), from Greek kanonikos, from kanon "rule" (see canon (n.1)).
canonical (adj.) Look up canonical at Dictionary.com
early 15c., from Medieval Latin canonicalis, from Late Latin canonicus "according to rule," in Church Latin, "pertaining to the canon" (see canon (n.2)). Earlier was canonial (early 13c.).
canonization (n.) Look up canonization at Dictionary.com
late 14c., from Medieval Latin canonizationem (nominative canonizatio), noun of action from past participle stem of canonizare (see canonize).
canonize (v.) Look up canonize at Dictionary.com
late 14c., "to place in the canon or calendar of saints," from Old French cannonisier and directly from Medieval Latin canonizare, from Late Latin canon "church rule" (see canon (n.1)). Related: Canonized; cannonizing.