comic (adj.)
late 14c., "of comedy in the dramatic sense," from Latin comicus "of comedy, represented in comedy, in comic style," from Greek komikos "of or pertaining to comedy," from komos (see comedy). Meaning "intentionally funny" first recorded 1791, and comedic (1630s) has since picked up the older sense of the word.
Speaking of the masters of the comedic spirit (if I call it, as he does, the Comic Spirit, this darkened generation will suppose me to refer to the animal spirits of tomfools and merryandrews) .... [G.B. Shaw, 1897]
Something that is comic has comedy as its aim or origin; something is comical if the effect is comedy, whether intended or not.
comical (adj.)
early 15c., "comic," from comic (or Latin comicus) + -al (1). Meaning "funny" is from 1680s. Earlier Middle English had an identical word meaning "epileptic," from Latin morbus comitialis "epilepsy."
coming (n.)
late 13c., verbal noun from come (v.). From mid-15c. as a present-participle adjective.
comingle (v.)
c. 1600, the better (because mingle is not from Latin), but less-used, English form of commingle. Related: comingled; comingling.
Comintern (n.)
"Third International," 1919, from contraction of Communist International.
comitatus
Latin collective of comes, comitem "a companion, an associate" (see count (n.1)).
comity (n.)
early 15c., "association," from French comité, from Latin comitas "courtesy, friendliness, kindness, affability," from comis "courteous, friendly, kind," from PIE *ko(m)smi-, literally "smiling with," from *kom- "together" + root *smei- "to laugh, smile" (see smile (v.)).

Meaning "courtesy" in English is from 1540s. Phrase comity of nations attested from 1862: "The obligation recognized by civilized nations to respect each other's laws and usages as far as their separate interests allow."
comix (n.)
1968 (R. Crumb), variant spelling of comics (see comic (n.)) in the comic book or strip sense.
comma (n.)
1520s as a Latin word, nativized by 1590s, from Latin comma "short phrase," from Greek komma "clause in a sentence," literally "piece which is cut off," from koptein "to cut off," from PIE root *kop- "to beat, strike" (see hatchet (n.)). Like colon (n.1) and period, originally a Greek rhetorical term for a part of a sentence, and like them it has been transferred to the punctuation mark that identifies it.
command (n.)
c. 1400, "order, command," from Old French comand (14c.), from comander (see command (v.)). Meaning "control, authority" is from mid-15c.
command (v.)
c. 1300, from Old French comander "to order, enjoin, entrust" (12c.), from Vulgar Latin *commandare, from Latin commendare "to recommend, entrust to" (see commend); altered by influence of Latin mandare "to commit, entrust" (see mandate (n.)). In this sense Old English had bebeodan. Related: Commanded; commanding.
commandant (n.)
1680s, from French commandant "the one commanding" originally "commanding," present participle of commander (Old French comander) "to order, enjoin;" see command (v.). Similar formation in Spanish and Italian comandante.
commandeer (v.)
1881, from Dutch (especially Afrikaans) kommandeeren "to command" (for military service), from French commander (see command (v.)). Related: Commandeered; commandeering.
commander (n.)
early 14c., comandur, from Old French comandeor, from comander (see command (v.)). Commander in chief attested from 1650s.
commanding (adj.)
late 15c. (in astronomy), present participle adjective from command (v.). Meaning "nobly dignified" is from 1590s. Meaning "dominant by virtue of size or position" is from 1630s. Related: Commandingly (mid-15c.).
commandment (n.)
late 13c., "an order from an authority," from Old French comandement "order, command," from Latin *commandamentum, from *commandare (see command (v.)). Pronounced as four syllables until 17c.
Of þe x commandements ... þe first comondement is þis, O God we ssul honuri [c. 1280]
commandments (n.)
short for The Ten Commandments, attested from late 13c. In Old English they were ða bebodu.
commando (n.)
Afrikaans, "a troop under a commander," from Portuguese, literally "party commanded" (see command (v.)); in use c. 1809 during the Peninsula campaign, then from 1834, in a South African sense, of military expeditions of the Boers against the natives; modern sense is from 1940 (originally shock troops to repel the threatened German invasion of England), first attested in writings of Winston Churchill, who could have picked it up during the Boer War. Phrase going commando "not wearing underwear" attested by 1996, U.S. slang, perhaps on notion of being ready for instant action.
comme il faut
1756, French, literally "as it should be;" from comme "as, like, how," from Old French com, from Vulgar Latin quomo, from Latin quomodo "how? in what way?," pronominal adverb of manner, related to quam "how much?," qui "who" (from PIE root *kwo-, stem of relative and interrogative pronouns).
commedia dell'arte (n.)
1877, Italian, literally "comedy of art;" see comedy + art (n.).
commemorate (v.)
1590s, from Latin commemoratus, past participle of commemorare "bring to remembrance" (see commemoration). Related: Commemorated; commemorates; commemorating.
commemoration (n.)
late 14c., "a calling to mind," also "service or church festival commemorating something," from Old French comemoration, from Latin commemorationem (nominative commemoratio) "reminding, mention," noun of action from past participle stem of commemorare "to call to mind," from com-, here as an intensive prefix (see com-), + memorare "to remind," from memor "mindful of" (see memory).
commemorative (adj.)
1610s, from commemorate + -ive. As a noun meaning "means of commemoration" it is recorded from 1630s; as short for commemorative postage stamp from 1916.
commen
obsolete spelling of common.
commence (v.)
c. 1300, from Old French comencier "to begin, start" (10c., Modern French commencer), from Vulgar Latin *cominitiare, originally "to initiate as priest, consecrate," from Latin com "with, together" (see com-) + initiare "to initiate," from initium "a beginning," noun use of neuter past participle of inire "to go into, begin," from in- "into, in" (from PIE root *en "in") + ire "to go" (from PIE root *ei- "to go").

Spelling with double -m- began in French and was established in English by 1500. Related: Commenced; commencing.
commencement (n.)
late 13c., "beginning," from Old French comencement "beginning, start" (Modern French commencement), from comencier (see commence). Meaning "school graduation ceremony" attested by 1850, American English. (Sense "entrance upon the privileges of a master or doctor in a university" is from late 14c.)
I know what you are thinking of -- the class members grouped in a semicircle on the stage, the three scared boys in new ready-made black suits, the seventeen pretty girls in fluffy white dresses (the gowns of the year), each senior holding a ribbon-tied manuscript bulging with thoughts on "Beyond the Alps Lies Italy," "Our Ship is Launched -- Whither Shall it Sail?" and similar topics. [Charles Moreau Harger, "The Real Commencement," "New Outlook," May 8, 1909]
commend (v.)
mid-14c., comenden, from Latin commendare "to commit to the care or keeping (of someone), to entrust to; to commit to writing;" hence "to set off, render agreeable, praise," from com-, intensive prefix (see com-), + mandare "to commit to one's charge" (see mandate (n.)). In some senses, a shortening of recommend. Related: Commended; commending.
commendable (adj.)
mid-14c., from Middle French commendable, from Latin commendabilis "praiseworthy," from commendare "commit to one's care, commend" (see commend). Related: Commendably.
commendation (n.)
"expression of approval," late 14c. (from c. 1200 as the name of one of the Offices of the Dead), from Old French commendacion "approval, praise," from Latin commendationem (nominative commendatio) "recommendation, commendation," noun of action from past participle stem of commendare "commit to one's care, commend" (see commend).
commensal (n.)
"one who eats at the same table" (as another), c. 1400, from Old French commensal (15c.), from Medieval Latin commensalis, from com "with, together" (see com-) + mensa (genitive mensalis) "table" (see mesa). Biological sense attested from 1870.
commensalism (n.)
1870, from commensal + -ism.
commensurable (adj.)
1550s, from Late Latin commensurabilis "having a common measure," from com "together, with" (see com-) + Latin mensurabilis "that can be measured," from mensurare "to measure," from Latin mensura "a measuring, a measurement; thing to measure by," from mensus, past participle of metiri "to measure," from PIE root *me- (2) "to measure."
commensurate (adj.)
1640s, from Late Latin commensuratus, from Latin com "with, together" (see com-) + Late Latin mensuratus, past participle of mensurare "to measure," from Latin mensura "a measuring, a measurement; thing to measure by," from mensus, past participle of metiri "to measure," from PIE root *me- (2) "to measure."
comment (v.)
early 15c., from Middle French commenter (15c.), from Latin commentari, from commentum (see comment (n.)). Related: Commented; commenting.
comment (n.)
late 14c., from Old French coment "commentary" or directly from Late Latin commentum "comment, interpretation," in classical Latin "invention, fabrication, fiction," neuter past participle of comminisci "to contrive, devise," from com-, intensive prefix (see com-), + base of meminisse "to remember," related to mens (genitive mentis) "mind" (from PIE root *men- (1) "to think").

The Latin word meaning "something invented" was taken by Isidore and other Christian theologians for "interpretation, annotation." No comment as a stock refusal to answer a journalist's question is first recorded 1950, from Truman's White House press secretary, Charles Ross.
commentary (n.)
1530s, from Middle French commentaire, or directly from Latin commentarius "notebook, annotation; diary, memoir," noun use of adjective, "relating to comments," from commentum (see comment (n.)). Perhaps the Latin noun is short for volumen commentarium. Originally in English as an adjective (early 15c.).
commentate (v.)
1794, "to comment," back-formation from commentator. Meaning "to deliver commentary" is attested from 1939 (implied in commentating). Related: Commentated; commentating.
commentator (n.)
late 14c., "writer of commentaries," agent noun in Latin form from comment or commentary (Latin commentator meant "inventor, author"). Middle English also had a noun commentate, attested from early 15c. Meaning "writer of notes or expository comments" is from 1640s; sense of "one who gives commentary" (originally in sports) is from 1928.
"Well, Jem, what is a commentator?["]--"Why," was Jem's reply, "I suppose it must be the commonest of all taturs." ["Smart Sayings of Bright Children," collected by Howard Paul, 1886]
commerce (n.)
1530s, from Middle French commerce (14c.), from Latin commercium "trade, trafficking," from com "with, together" (see com-) + merx (genitive mercis) "merchandise" (see market (n.)).
commercial (n.)
"an advertisement broadcast on radio or TV," 1935, from commercial (adj.).
commercial (adj.)
1680s, "pertaining to trade," from commerce + -al (1). Meaning "paid for by advertisements" (in reference to radio, TV, etc.) is from 1932; meaning "done for the sake of financial profit" (of art, etc.) is from 1871. Related: Commercially.
commercialism (n.)
"principles and practice of commerce," 1849, from commercial (adj.) + -ism.
commercialization (n.)
1889, from commercialize + noun ending -ation.
commercialize (v.)
1830, from commercial (adj.) + -ize. Related: Commercialized; commercializing.
commingle (v.)
1620s, from com- + mingle. See comingle. Related: Commingled; commingling.
comminute (v.)
1620s, from Latin comminutus, past participle of comminuere "to lessen, break into smaller parts," from com "with, together" (see com-) + minuere "to make smaller" (from PIE root *mei- (2) "small"). Related: Comminuted; comminuting.
commiserate (v.)
c. 1600, from Latin commiseratus, past participle of commiserari "to pity, bewail" (see commiseration). Related: Commiserated; commiserating. An Old English loan-translation of commiserate was efensargian.
commiseration (n.)
1580s, from Middle French commisération, from Latin commiserationem (nominative commiseratio) "act or fact of pitying," noun of action from past participle stem of commiserari "to pity," from com- intensive prefix (see com-) + miserari "bewail, lament," from miser "wretched" (see miser).
commissar (n.)
1918, from Russian komissar, from German Kommissar "commissioner," from French, ultimately from Medieval Latin commissarius (see commissary).
commissariat (n.)
c. 1600, in Scottish law, "commissary court," from French commissariat, from Medieval Latin *commissariatus, from commissarius (see commissary). Military use is from 1779. In reference to the USSR, "ministry," from 1918.