colony (n.) Look up colony at Dictionary.com
late 14c., "ancient Roman settlement outside Italy," from Latin colonia "settled land, farm, landed estate," from colonus "husbandman, tenant farmer, settler in new land," from colere "to inhabit, cultivate, frequent, practice, tend, guard, respect," from PIE root *kwel- (1) "move around" (source of Latin -cola "inhabitant;" see cycle (n.)). Also used by the Romans to translate Greek apoikia "people from home." Modern application dates from 1540s.
colophon (n.) Look up colophon at Dictionary.com
1774, "publisher's inscription at the end of a book," from Latin colophon, from Greek kolophon "summit, final touch" (see hill).
color (n.) Look up color at Dictionary.com
early 13c., "skin color, complexion," from Old French color "color, complexion, appearance" (Modern French couleur), from Latin color "color of the skin; color in general, hue; appearance," from Old Latin colos, originally "a covering" (akin to celare "to hide, conceal"), from PIE root *kel- (2) "to cover, conceal" (see cell).

For sense evolution, compare Sanskrit varnah "covering, color," related to vrnoti "covers," and also see chroma. Meaning "visible color, color of something" is attested in English from c.1300. As "color as a property of things," from late 14c. Old English words for "color" were hiw ("hue"), bleo.
color (v.) Look up color at Dictionary.com
late 14c.; see color (n.); earliest use is figurative. Related: Colored; coloring.
color blindness (n.) Look up color blindness at Dictionary.com
1844, replacing Daltonism (after English chemist John Dalton, 1766-1844, who published a description of it in 1794); in figurative use, with reference to race or ethnicity, attested from 1866, American English. Related: color blind (adj.).
Colorado Look up Colorado at Dictionary.com
U.S. state (organized as a territory 1861, admitted as a state 1876), named for the river, Spanish Rio Colorado, from colorado "ruddy, reddish," literally "colored," past participle of colorar "to color, dye, paint," from Latin colorare (see coloration).
coloration (n.) Look up coloration at Dictionary.com
1620s, from French coloration (16c.), from Late Latin colorationem (nominative coloratio) "act or fact of coloring," noun of action from past participle stem of Latin colorare "to color, to get tanned," from color (see color (n.)).
coloratura (n.) Look up coloratura at Dictionary.com
"Ornamental passages, roulades, embellishments, etc., in vocal music" [Elson], 1740, from Italian coloratura, literally "coloring," from Late Latin coloratura, from colorare "to color," from color (see color (n.)).
colorectal (adj.) Look up colorectal at Dictionary.com
by 1918, from comb. form of colon (n.2) + rectal.
colored (adj.) Look up colored at Dictionary.com
late 14c., past participle adjective from color (v.); in reference to "non-white skin," 1610s.
colorful (adj.) Look up colorful at Dictionary.com
1889, in figurative sense of "interesting," from color (n.) + -ful. Related: Colorfully.
coloring (n.) Look up coloring at Dictionary.com
late 14c., "action of applying color," noun of action from color (v.). Figurative use by 1540s. Meaning "way something is colored" is early 15c. Coloring book is from 1931.
colorless (adj.) Look up colorless at Dictionary.com
late 14c., from color (n.) + -less. Figurative sense of "lacking vividness" is recorded from 1861. Related: Colorlessness.
colors (n.) Look up colors at Dictionary.com
"flag of a regiment or ship" 1580s, from color (n.).
colossal (adj.) Look up colossal at Dictionary.com
1712 (colossic in the same sense is recorded from c.1600), from French colossal, from colosse, from Latin colossus, from Greek kolossos (see colossus).
Colosseum (n.) Look up Colosseum at Dictionary.com
1560s, Medieval Latin name for the classical Amphitheatrum Flavium (begun c.70 C.E.), noun use of neuter of adjective colosseus "gigantic;" perhaps a reference to the colossal statue of Nero that long stood nearby (see colossus).
colossus (n.) Look up colossus at Dictionary.com
"gigantic statue," late 14c., from Latin colossus "a statue larger than life," from Greek kolossos "gigantic statue," of unknown origin, used by Herodotus of giant Egyptian statues, and used by Romans of the bronze Apollo at the entrance to the harbor of Rhodes. Figurative sense of "any thing of awesome greatness or vastness" is from 1794.
colostomy (n.) Look up colostomy at Dictionary.com
1888, from colon (n.2) + Modern Latin -stoma "opening, orifice," from Greek stoma "opening, mouth" (see stoma).
colostrum (n.) Look up colostrum at Dictionary.com
1570s, from Latin colostrum "first milk from an animal," of unknown origin.
colour Look up colour at Dictionary.com
chiefly British English spelling of color (q.v.); for ending see -or. Related: Coloured; colouring; colourful; colours.
colposcopy (n.) Look up colposcopy at Dictionary.com
1940, from colpo-, Latinized comb. form of Greek kolpos "womb" (used from c.1900 in medical compounds in sense "vagina;" see gulf (n.)) + -oscopy (see -scope).
colt (n.) Look up colt at Dictionary.com
Old English colt "colt," originally "young ass," in Biblical translations also used for "young camel," perhaps from Proto-Germanic *kultaz (cognates: Swedish dialectal kult "young boar, piglet; boy," Danish kuld "offspring, brood") and akin to child. Applied to persons from early 13c.
COLT'S TOOTH An old fellow who marries, or keeps a young girl, is ſaid to have a colt's tooth in his head. ["Classical Dictionary of the Vulgar Tongue," 1796]
Colt (n.) Look up Colt at Dictionary.com
type of revolver, 1838, originally the manufacture of U.S. gunsmith Samuel Colt (1814-1862).
coltish (adj.) Look up coltish at Dictionary.com
late 14c., "wild, frisky," also in early use "lustful, lewd," from colt + -ish. Lit. sense of "pertaining to a colt" is recorded from 1540s.
columbarium (n.) Look up columbarium at Dictionary.com
"subterranean sepulchre in ancient Roman places with niches for urns holding remains," neuter of Latin columbarius, "dove-cote" (so called from resemblance), literally "pertaining to doves;" from columba "dove." Literal sense of "dove-cote" is attested in English from 1881.
Columbia Look up Columbia at Dictionary.com
poetic name for United States of America, earlier for the British colonies there, 1730s, also the nation's female personification, from name of Christopher Columbus (also see Colombia) with Latin "country" ending -ia. A popular name for places and institutions in the U.S. in the post-Revolutionary years, when former tributes to king and crown were out of fashion: such as Columbia University (New York, U.S.) founded in 1754 as King's College; re-named 1784. Also District of Columbia (1791, as Territory of Columbia); "Hail, Columbia" (Joseph Hopkinson, 1798), Barlow's "Columbiad" (1809).
columbine (n.) Look up columbine at Dictionary.com
c.1300, from Old French columbine "columbine," or directly from Medieval Latin columbina, from Late Latin columbina "verbena," fem. of Latin columbinus, literally "dove-like," from columba "dove." The inverted flower supposedly resembles a cluster of five doves. Also a fem. proper name; in Italian comedy, the name of the mistress of Harlequin.
Columbus Look up Columbus at Dictionary.com
his name is Latinized from his native Italian Cristoforo Colombo, in Spanish Christobal Colon.
America was discovered accidentally by a great seaman who was looking for something else, and most of the exploration for the next fifty years was done in the hope of getting through or around it. [S.E. Morison, "The Oxford History of the United States," 1965]
column (n.) Look up column at Dictionary.com
mid-15c., "vertical division of a page," also "a pillar, post," from Old French colombe (12c., Modern French colonne "column, pillar"), from Latin columna "pillar," collateral form of columen "top, summit," from PIE root *kel- (4) "to project, be prominent" (see hill). Sense of "matter written for a newspaper" dates from 1785.
columnar (adj.) Look up columnar at Dictionary.com
1728, from Late Latin columnaris "rising in the form of a pillar," from columna "column" (see column).
columnist (n.) Look up columnist at Dictionary.com
1920, from column in the newspaper sense + -ist.
com- Look up com- at Dictionary.com
word-forming element usually meaning "with, together," from Latin com, archaic form of classical Latin cum "together, together with, in combination," from PIE *kom- "beside, near, by, with" (compare Old English ge-, German ge-). The prefix in Latin sometimes was used as an intensive.

Before vowels and aspirates, reduced to co-; before -g-, assimilated to cog- or con-; before -l-, assimilated to col-; before -r-, assimilated to cor-; before -c-, -d-, -j-, -n-, -q-, -s-, -t-, -v- assimilated to con-.
coma (n.1) Look up coma at Dictionary.com
state of prolonged unconsciousness, 1640s, from Latinized form of Greek koma (genitive komatos) "deep sleep," of uncertain origin. A term for "coma" in Middle English was false sleep (late 14c.).
coma (n.2) Look up coma at Dictionary.com
"head of a comet," 1765, from Latin coma, from Greek kome "hair of the head," of unknown origin. Earlier in English as a botanical term for a tuft of hairs (1660s).
Comanche (n.) Look up Comanche at Dictionary.com
1819, from Spanish, from a word in a Shoshonean language, such as Ute kimánci "enemy, foreigner." Comanchero was a 19c. name given to Hispanic and American traders who dealt with the Comanches.
comatose (adj.) Look up comatose at Dictionary.com
1755, from Latinized form of Greek komat-, comb. form of koma (genitive komatos; see coma) + -ose (1). Perhaps immediately from French comateux. Transferred sense of "lethargic" is from 1828.
comb (n.) Look up comb at Dictionary.com
Old English camb "comb, crest, honeycomb" (later Anglian comb), from Proto-Germanic *kambaz (cognates: Old Saxon and Old High German camb, German Kamm, Middle Dutch cam, Dutch kam, Old Norse kambr), literally "toothed object," from PIE *gombhos, from root *gembh- "to bite, tooth" (cognates: Greek gomphos "a molar tooth," Sanskrit gambha-s "tooth").
comb (v.) Look up comb at Dictionary.com
late 14c. (implied in past participle kombid), verb derived from comb (n.); replacing the former verb, Old English cemban, which however survives in unkempt. Related: Combed; combing.
combat (v.) Look up combat at Dictionary.com
1560s, from Middle French combat (16c.), from Old French combattre (12c.), from Late Latin combattere, from Latin com- "with" (each other) (see com-) + battuere "to beat, fight" (see batter (v.)). Related: Combated; combating; combatted; combatting.
combat (n.) Look up combat at Dictionary.com
1560s, from Middle French combat (16c.), from combattre (see combat (v.)).
combatant Look up combatant at Dictionary.com
mid-15c. (adj.), late 15c. (n.), from Old French combatant (Modern French combattant) "skilled at fighting, warlike" (also used as a noun in Old French), present participle adjective of combattre (see combat (v.)).
combative (adj.) Look up combative at Dictionary.com
1819, from combat + -ive. In 1820s-30s, much associated with phrenology. Related: Combatively; combativeness (1815).
comber (n.) Look up comber at Dictionary.com
c.1200, "one who cards wool," agent noun from comb (v.).
combination (n.) Look up combination at Dictionary.com
late 14c., combinacyoun, from Old French combination (14c., Modern French combinaison), from Late Latin combinationem (nominative combinatio) "a joining two by two," noun of action from past participle stem of combinare (see combine (v.)).
combine (n.) Look up combine at Dictionary.com
"machine that cuts, threshes and cleans grain" (short for combine harvester), 1857, from combine (v.).
combine (v.) Look up combine at Dictionary.com
early 15c., from Middle French combiner (14c.), from Late Latin combinare "to unite, yoke together," from Latin com- "together" (see com-) + bini "two by two," adverb from bi- "twice" (see binary). Related: Combinative; combined; combining.
combo (n.) Look up combo at Dictionary.com
1929, U.S. slang, originally in entertainment (jazz groups, dance teams), short for combination.
combust Look up combust at Dictionary.com
late 14c. as an adjective, "burnt," from Old French combust (14c.), from Latin combustus, past participle of combuere "to burn up, consume" (see combustion). Also an astrological term for planets when near the sun. The verb is attested from late 15c. Related: Combusted; combusting.
combustible (adj.) Look up combustible at Dictionary.com
1520s, from Middle French combustible, or directly from Late Latin combustibilis, from Latin combustus, past participle of combuere "to burn up, consume" (see combustion). Figurative sense is from 1640s; as a noun, from 1680s. Related: Combustibility (late 15c.).
combustion (n.) Look up combustion at Dictionary.com
early 15c., from Old French combustion (13c.), from Latin combustionem (nominative combustio) "a burning," noun of action from past participle stem of Latin comburere "to burn up, consume," from com-, intensive prefix (see com-), + *burere, faulty separation of amburere "to burn around," actually ambi-urere, from urere "to burn, singe," from PIE root *eus- "to burn" (see ember).