coast (v.) Look up coast at Dictionary.com
late 14c., "to skirt, to go around the sides, to go along the border" of something (as a ship does the coastline), from Anglo-French costien, from the French source of coast (n.). The meaning "sled downhill," first attested 1775 in American English, is a separate borrowing. Of motor vehicles, "to move without thrust from the engine," by 1925; figurative use, of persons, "not to exert oneself," by 1934. Related: Coasted; coasting.
coastal (adj.) Look up coastal at Dictionary.com
1883, from coast (n.) + -al (1). The proper Latin form costal is used only of ribs.
coaster (n.) Look up coaster at Dictionary.com
1570s, "one who sails along coasts," agent noun from coast (v.) in its original sense "to go around the sides or border" of something. Applied to vessels for such sailing from 1680s. Tabletop drink stand (c.1887), originally "round tray for a decanter," so called from a resemblance to a sled, or because it "coasted" around the perimeter of the table to each guest in turn after dinner.
coastline (n.) Look up coastline at Dictionary.com
1860, from coast (n.) + line (n.).
coat (n.) Look up coat at Dictionary.com
early 14c., "outer garment," from Old French cote "coat, robe, tunic, overgarment," from Frankish *kotta "coarse cloth" or some other Germanic source (compare Old Saxon kot "woolen mantle," Old High German chozza "cloak of coarse wool," German Kotze "a coarse coat"), of unknown origin. Transferred to animal's natural covering late 14c. Extended 1660s to a layer of any substance covering any surface. Spanish, Portuguese cota, Italian cotta are Germanic loan-words.
coat (v.) Look up coat at Dictionary.com
late 14c., "to provide with a coat," from coat (n.). Meaning "to cover with a substance" is from 1753. Related: Coated; coating.
coat of arms (n.) Look up coat of arms at Dictionary.com
mid-14c., originally a tunic embroidered with heraldic arms (worn over armor, etc); see from coat (n.) + arm (n.2) and compare Old French cote a armer. Sense transferred to the heraldic arms themselves by 1560s. Hence turncoat, one who put his coat on inside-out to hide the badge of his loyalty.
coati (n.) Look up coati at Dictionary.com
Brazilian raccoon, 1670s, from Tupi (Brazil), from cua "belt, cincture" + tim "nose."
coating (n.) Look up coating at Dictionary.com
"layer over a surface," 1768, verbal noun from coat (v.).
coattails (n.) Look up coattails at Dictionary.com
also coat-tail, c.1600, from coat (n.) + tail (n.). In 17c., to do something on one's own coattail meant "at one's own expense. Meaning "power of one person," especially in politics, is from 1848 (in a Congressional speech by Abraham Lincoln, in reference to Andrew Jackson); expression riding (someone's) coattails into political office is from 1949.
coauthor (n.) Look up coauthor at Dictionary.com
also co-author, from co- + author. From 1948 as a verb. Related: Coauthored; coauthoring.
coax (v.) Look up coax at Dictionary.com
1580s, originally in slang phrase to make a coax of, from earlier noun coax, cox, cokes "a fool, ninny, simpleton" (1560s); modern spelling is 1706. Origin obscure, perhaps related to cock (n.1). Related: Coaxed; coaxing.
coaxial (adj.) Look up coaxial at Dictionary.com
"having a common axis," 1904, as a term in mathematics; coaxial cable is 1934. See co- + axial.
cob (n.) Look up cob at Dictionary.com
a word or set of identical words with a wide range of meanings, many seeming to derive from notions of "heap, lump, rounded object," also "head" and its metaphoric extensions. With cognates in other Germanic languages; of uncertain origin and development. "The N.E.D. recognizes eight nouns cob, with numerous sub-groups. Like other monosyllables common in the dial[ect] its hist[ory] is inextricable" [Weekley]. In the 2nd print edition, the number stands at 11. Some senses are probably from Old English copp "top, head," others probably from Old Norse kubbi or Low German, all perhaps from a Proto-Germanic base *kubb- "something rounded." Among the earliest attested English senses are "headman, chief," and "male swan," both early 15c., but the surname Cobb (1066) suggests Old English used a form of the word as a nickname for "big, leading man." The "corn shoot" sense is attested by 1680s.
cobalt (n.) Look up cobalt at Dictionary.com
1680s, from German kobold "household goblin," Harz Mountains silver miners' term for rock laced with arsenic and sulfur (so called because it degraded the ore and made the miners ill), from Middle High German kobe "hut, shed" + *holt "goblin," from hold "gracious, friendly," a euphemistic word for a troublesome being. The metallic element was extracted from this rock. It was known to Paracelsus, but discovery is usually credited to the Swede George Brandt (1733), who gave it the name. Extended to a blue color 1835 (a mineral containing it had been used as a blue coloring for glass since 16c.). Compare nickel.
cobble (n.) Look up cobble at Dictionary.com
"paving stone; worn, rounded stone," c.1600, earlier cobblestone, probably a diminutive of cob in some sense. The verb in this sense is from 1690s. Related: Cobbled; cobbling.
cobble (v.) Look up cobble at Dictionary.com
"to mend clumsily," late 15c., perhaps a back-formation from cobbler (n.1), or from cob, via a notion of lumps. Related: Cobbled; cobbling.
cobbler (n.1) Look up cobbler at Dictionary.com
late 13c., cobelere "one who mends shoes," of uncertain origin. It and cobble (v.) "evidently go together etymologically" [OED], but the historical record presents some difficulties. "The cobbler should stick to his last" (ne sutor ultra crepidam) is from the anecdote of Greek painter Apelles.
On one occasion a cobbler noticed a fault in the painting of a shoe, and remarking upon it to a person standing by, passed on. As soon as the man was out of sight Apelles came from his hiding-place, examined the painting, found that the cobbler's criticism was just, and at once corrected the error. ... The cobbler came by again and soon discovered that the fault he had pointed out had been remedied; and, emboldened by the success of his criticism, began to express his opinion pretty freely about the painting of the leg! This was too much for the patience of the artist, who rushed from his hiding place and told the cobbler to stick to his shoes. [William Edward Winks, "Lives of Illustrious Shoemakers," London, 1883]
[The quote is variously reported: Pliny ("Natural History" XXXV.x.36) has ne supra crepidam judicaret, while Valerius Maximus (VIII.xiii.3) gives supra plantam ascendere vetuit.]
cobbler (n.2) Look up cobbler at Dictionary.com
"deep-dish fruit pie," 1859, American English, perhaps related to 14c. cobeler "wooden bowl."
cobblestone (n.) Look up cobblestone at Dictionary.com
late 14c., kobilstane; see cobble (n.) + stone (n.).
COBOL (n.) Look up COBOL at Dictionary.com
1960, U.S. Defense Department acronym, from "Common Business-Oriented Language."
cobra (n.) Look up cobra at Dictionary.com
1802, short for cobra capello (1670s), from Portuguese cobra de capello "serpent (of the hood)," from Latin colubra "a snake, female serpent" (source of French couleuvre "adder"), of uncertain origin. So called for the expandable loose skin about its neck. The word came to English via Portuguese colonies in India, where the native name is nag (see naga).
cobweb (n.) Look up cobweb at Dictionary.com
early 14c., coppewebbe; the first element is Old English -coppe, in atorcoppe "spider," literally "poison-head" (see attercop). Spelling with -b- is from 16c., perhaps from cob. Cob as a stand-alone for "a spider" was an old word nearly dead even in dialects when J.R.R. Tolkien used it in "The Hobbit" (1937).
coca (n.) Look up coca at Dictionary.com
South American plant, 1570s, from Spanish coca, from Quechua cuca, which is perhaps ultimately from Aymara, a native language of Bolivia.
Coca-Cola Look up Coca-Cola at Dictionary.com
invented 1886 in Atlanta, Georgia, U.S., by druggist Dr. John S. Pemberton. So called because original ingredients were derived from coca leaves and cola nuts. It contained minute amounts of cocaine until 1909.
Drink the brain tonic and intellectual soda fountain beverage Coca-Cola. [Atlanta "Evening Journal," June 30, 1887]
Coca-colanization, also Coca-colonization coined 1950 during an attempt to ban the beverage in France, led by the communist party and the wine-growers.
France's Communist press bristled with warnings against US "Coca-Colonization." Coke salesmen were described as agents of the OSS and the U.S. State Department. "Tremble," roared Vienna's Communist Der Abend, "Coca-Cola is on the march!" [Time Magazine, 1950]
Coca-colonialism attested by 1956.
cocaine (n.) Look up cocaine at Dictionary.com
1874, from Modern Latin cocaine (1856), coined by Albert Niemann of Gottingen University from coca (from Quechua cuca) + chemical suffix -ine (2). A medical coinage, the drug was used 1870s as a local anaesthetic for eye surgery, etc. "It is interesting to note that although cocaine is pronounced as a disyllabic word it is trisyllabic in its formation." [Flood]
cocci (n.) Look up cocci at Dictionary.com
spherical-shaped bacteria, plural of Latin coccus, from Greek kokkos "berry" (see cocco-).
coccidiosis (n.) Look up coccidiosis at Dictionary.com
Modern Latin, from Greek *kokkidion, diminutive of kokkis, diminutive of kokkos "berry" + -osis.
cocco- Look up cocco- at Dictionary.com
word-forming element meaning "berry, seed," or something shaped like them, from Latinized form of Greek kokkos "a grain, a seed," especially "kermes-berry, gall of the kermes oak" (actually an insect), which yields scarlet dye, of unknown origin, perhaps from a non-Greek source.
coccus (n.) Look up coccus at Dictionary.com
1763 as an insect genus (including the cochineal bug); 1883 as a type of bacterium, from Greek kokkos "grain, seed, berry" (see cocco-).
coccyx (n.) Look up coccyx at Dictionary.com
1610s, from Latin coccyx, from Greek kokkyx "cuckoo" (from kokku, like the bird's English name echoic of its cry), so called by ancient Greek physician Galen because the bone in humans supposedly resembles a cuckoo's beak.
Cochin-china Look up Cochin-china at Dictionary.com
old name of a region and French colony in southern Vietnam, from French Cochin-China, from Portuguese corruption of Ko-chen, of uncertain meaning; the China added to distinguish it from the town and port of Cochin in southwest India, the name of which is Tamil, perhaps from koncham "little," in reference to the river there.
cochineal (n.) Look up cochineal at Dictionary.com
1580s, from French cochenille (16c.), probably from Spanish cochinilla, from a diminutive of Latin coccinus (adj.) "scarlet-colored," from coccum "berry (actually an insect) yielding scarlet dye" (see kermes). But some sources identify the Spanish source word as cochinilla "wood louse" (a diminutive form related to French cochon "pig").

The insect (Coccus Cacti) lives on the prickly pear cactus in Mexico and Central America and is a relative of the kermes and has similar, but more intense, dying qualities. Aztecs and other Mexican Indians used it as a dyestuff. It first is mentioned in Europe in 1523 in Spanish correspondence to Hernán Cortés in Mexico. Specimens were brought to Spain in the 1520s, and cloth merchants in Antwerp were buying cochineal in insect and powdered form in Spain by the 1540s. It soon superseded the use of kermes as a tinetorial substance. Other species of coccus are useless for dye and considered mere pests, such as the common mealy bug.
Cochise Look up Cochise at Dictionary.com
(c.1815-1874), leader of the Chiricahua Apache people; his name is Athabaskan, perhaps from chizh "firewood" (compare ko-chizh "his firewood"), or from ch'izhi "the rough one."
cochlea (n.) Look up cochlea at Dictionary.com
"spiral cavity of the inner ear," 1680s, from Latin cochlea "snail shell," from Greek kokhlias "snail, screw," etc., from kokhlos "spiral shell," perhaps related to konkhos "mussel, conch."
cock (n.1) Look up cock at Dictionary.com
"male chicken," Old English cocc "male bird," Old French coc (12c., Modern French coq), Old Norse kokkr, all of echoic origin. Old English cocc was a nickname for "one who strutted like a cock," thus a common term in the Middle Ages for a pert boy, used of scullions, apprentices, servants, etc.

A common personal name till c.1500, it was affixed to Christian names as a pet diminutive, as in Wilcox, Hitchcock, etc. Slang sense of "penis" is attested since 1610s (but compare pillicock "penis," from c.1300); cock-teaser is from 1891. A cocker spaniel (1823) was trained to start woodcocks. Cock-and-bull is first recorded 1620s, perhaps an allusion to Aesop's fables, with their incredible talking animals, or to a particular story, now forgotten. French has parallel expression coq-à-l'âne.
cock (n.2) Look up cock at Dictionary.com
in various mechanical senses, such as cock of a faucet (early 15c.) is of uncertain connection with cock (n.1), but German has hahn "cock" in many of the same senses. The cock of an old matchlock firearm is 1560s, hence half-cocked "with the cock lifted to the first catch, at which position the trigger does not act" (by 1809).
cock (v.) Look up cock at Dictionary.com
mid-12c., cocken, "to fight;" 1570s, "to swagger;" seeming contradictory modern senses of "to stand up" (as in cock one's ear), c.1600, and "to bend" (1898) are from the two cock nouns. The first is probably in reference to the posture of the bird's head or tail, the second to the firearm position. To cock ones hat carries the notion of "defiant boastfulness."
cock-a-doodle-doo Look up cock-a-doodle-doo at Dictionary.com
1570s, imitative; compare French cocorico, German kikeriki, Latin cucurire, Russian kikareku, Vietnamese cuc-cu, Arabic ko-ko, etc.
cockade (n.) Look up cockade at Dictionary.com
1709, earlier cockard (1650s), from French cocarde (16c.), fem. of cocard (Old French cocart) "foolishly proud, cocky," as a noun, "idiot, fool;" an allusive extension from coq (see cock (n.1)).
Cockaigne (n.) Look up Cockaigne at Dictionary.com
c.1300, from Old French Cocaigne (12c.) "lubberland," imaginary country, abode of luxury and idleness. Of obscure origin, speculation centers on words related to cook (v.) and cake (compare Middle Dutch kokenje, a child's honey-sweetened treat; also compare Big Rock Candy Mountain). The German equivalent is Schlaraffenland.
cockamamie (adj.) Look up cockamamie at Dictionary.com
American English slang word attested by 1946, popularized c.1960, but said to be New York City children's slang from mid-1920s; perhaps an alteration of decalcomania (see decal).
cockatoo (n.) Look up cockatoo at Dictionary.com
1610s, from Dutch kaketoe, from Malay kakatua, possibly echoic, or from kakak "elder brother or sister" + tua "old." Also cockatiel (1880), from Dutch diminutive kaketielje (1850), which is perhaps influenced by Portuguese. Spelling influenced by cock (n.1).
cockatrice (n.) Look up cockatrice at Dictionary.com
late 14c., from Old French cocatriz, altered (by influence of coq) from Late Latin *calcatrix, from Latin calcare "to tread" (from calx (1) "heel"), as translation of Greek ikhneumon, literally "tracker, tracer."

In classical writings, an Egyptian animal of some sort, the mortal enemy of the crocodile, which it tracks down and kills. This vague sense became hopelessly confused in the Christian West, and in England the word ended up applied to the equivalent of the basilisk. A serpent hatched from a cock's egg, it was fabled to kill by its glance and could be slain only by tricking it into seeing its own reflection. Belief in them persisted even among the educated because the word was used in the KJV several times to translate a Hebrew word for "serpent." In heraldry, a beast half cock, half serpent.
cockchaffer (n.) Look up cockchaffer at Dictionary.com
from cock (n.1), in reference to its size, + chaffer.
cockerel (n.) Look up cockerel at Dictionary.com
"young cock," mid-15c. (late 12c. as a surname), apparently a diminutive of cock (n.1). Despite the form, no evidence that it is from French.
cockeyed (adj.) Look up cockeyed at Dictionary.com
1821, "squint-eyed," perhaps from cock (v.) in some sense + eye (n.). Figurative sense of "absurd, askew, crazy" is from 1896; that of "drunk" is attested from 1926.
cockle (n.1) Look up cockle at Dictionary.com
type of mollusk, early 14c., from Old French coquille (13c.) "scallop, scallop shell; mother of pearl; a kind of hat," altered (by influence of coque "shell") from Vulgar Latin *conchilia, from Latin conchylium "mussel, shellfish," from Greek konkhylion "little shellfish," from konkhe "mussel, conch." Phrase cockles of the heart (1660s) is perhaps from similar shape, or from Latin corculum, diminutive of cor "heart."
cockle (n.2) Look up cockle at Dictionary.com
flowering weed that grows in wheat fields, Old English coccel "darnel," used in Middle English to translate the Bible word now usually given as tares (see tare (n.1)). It is in no other Germanic language and may be from a diminutive of Latin coccus "grain, berry."
cockney (n.) Look up cockney at Dictionary.com
c.1600, usually said to be from rare Middle English cokenei, cokeney "spoiled child, milksop" (late 14c.), originally cokene-ey "cock's egg" (mid-14c.). Most likely disentangling of the etymology is to start from Old English cocena "cock's egg" -- genitive plural of coc "cock" + æg "egg" -- medieval term for "runt of a clutch," extended derisively c.1520s to "town dweller," gradually narrowing thereafter to residents of a particular neighborhood in the East End of London. Liberman, however, disagrees:
[I]n all likelihood, not the etymon of ME cokeney 'milksop, simpleton; effeminate man; Londoner,' which is rather a reshaping of [Old French] acoquiné 'spoiled' (participle). However, this derivation poses some phonetic problems that have not been resolved.
The accent so called from 1890, but the speech peculiarities were noted from 17c. As an adjective in this sense, from 1630s.