Clovis Look up Clovis at Dictionary.com
type of prehistoric stone spearpoints, 1943, from Clovis, New Mexico, U.S., near which place they were found. The town is said to have been named for the Frankish king Clovis (Latinized from Frankish Chlodovech, from Germanic masc. proper name *hluda-wigaz "famous in battle," cognate with Ludwig and Louis).
clowder Look up clowder at Dictionary.com
1811, variant of clutter.
clown (v.) Look up clown at Dictionary.com
c. 1600, "to play the clown onstage," from clown (n.); colloquial sense of "to behave inappropriately" (as in clown around, 1932) attested by 1928, perhaps from theatrical slang sense of "play a (non-comical) part farcically or comically" (1891). Related: Clowned; clowning.
clown (n.) Look up clown at Dictionary.com
1560s, clowne, also cloyne, "rustic, boor, peasant," origin uncertain. Perhaps from Scandinavian dialect (compare Icelandic klunni "clumsy, boorish fellow;" Swedish kluns "a hard knob; a clumsy fellow," Danish klunt "log, block"), or akin to North Frisian klönne "clumsy person." Or, less likely, from Latin colonus "colonist, farmer," though awareness of this word might have influenced the sense development in English.

Meaning "professional fool, professional or habitual jester" is c. 1600. "The pantomime clown represents a blend of the Shakes[pearean] rustic with one of the stock types of the It. comedy" [Weekley]. Meaning "contemptible person" is from 1920s. Fem. form clowness attested from 1801.
clownage (n.) Look up clownage at Dictionary.com
"function or manners of a clown or jester," 1580s, from clown (n.) + -age.
clownery (n.) Look up clownery at Dictionary.com
1580s, from clown (n.) + -ery.
clownify (v.) Look up clownify at Dictionary.com
1610s, from clown (n.) + -ify. Related: Clownified; clownifying.
clowning (n.) Look up clowning at Dictionary.com
1861, verbal noun from clown (v.).
clownish (adj.) Look up clownish at Dictionary.com
1560s, "rustic;" 1580s, "boorish, ungainly, awkward," from clown (n.) + -ish. Related: Clownishly; clownishness.
cloy (v.) Look up cloy at Dictionary.com
"weary by too much, fill to loathing, surfeit," 1520s, from Middle English cloyen "hinder movement, encumber" (late 14c.), a shortening of accloyen (early 14c.), from Old French encloer "to fasten with a nail, grip, grasp," figuratively "to hinder, check, stop, curb," from Late Latin inclavare "drive a nail into a horse's foot when shoeing," from Latin clavus "a nail" (see slot (n.2)).
Accloye is a hurt that cometh of shooing, when a Smith driveth a nail in the quick, which make him to halt. [Edward Topsell, "The History of Four-footed Beasts," 1607]
The figurative meaning "fill to a satiety, overfill" is attested for accloy from late 14c. Related: Cloyed; cloying.
cloying (adj.) Look up cloying at Dictionary.com
1640s, present participle adjective from cloy (v.). Related: Cloyingly; cloyingness.
cloze (n.) Look up cloze at Dictionary.com
1953, in psychological writing, evidently abstracted from the pronunciation of closure.
club (v.) Look up club at Dictionary.com
"to hit with a club," 1590s, from club (v.). Meaning "gather in a club-like mass" is from 1620s. Related: Clubbed; clubbing.
CLUB, verb (military). -- In manoeuvring troops, so to blunder the word of command that the soldiers get into a position from which they cannot extricate themselves by ordinary tactics. [Farmer & Henley]
club (n.) Look up club at Dictionary.com
c. 1200, "thick stick used as a weapon," from Old Norse klubba "cudgel" or a similar Scandinavian source (compare Swedish klubba, Danish klubbe), assimilated from Proto-Germanic *klumbon, related to clump (n.). Old English words for this were sagol, cycgel. Specific sense of "bat used in games" is from mid-15c.

The club suit in the deck of cards (1560s) bears the correct name (Spanish basto, Italian bastone), but the pattern adopted on English cards is the French trefoil. Compare Danish klőver, Dutch klaver "a club at cards," literally "a clover."

The social club (1660s) apparently evolved from this word from the verbal sense "gather in a club-like mass" (1620s), then, as a noun, "association of people" (1640s).
We now use the word clubbe for a sodality in a tavern. [John Aubrey, 1659]

Admission to membership of clubs is commonly by ballot. Clubs are now an important feature of social life in all large cities, many of them occupying large buildings containing reading-rooms, libraries, restaurants, etc. [Century Dictionary, 1902]

I got a good mind to join a club and beat you over the head with it. [Rufus T. Firefly]
Club soda is by 1881, originally a proprietary name (Cantrell & Cochrane, Dublin). Club sandwich recorded by 1899, apparently as a type of sandwich served in clubs. Club car is from 1890, American English, originally one well-appointed and reserved for members of a club run by the railway company; later of any railway car fitted with chairs instead of benches, and other amenities (1917). Hence club for "class of fares between first-class and transit" (1978).
The club car is one of the most elaborate developments of the entire Commuter idea. It is a comfortable coach, which is rented to a group of responsible men coming either from a single point or a chain of contiguous points. The railroad charges from $250 to $300 a month for the use of this car in addition to the commutation fares, and the "club" arranges dues to cover this cost and the cost of such attendants and supplies as it may elect to place on its roving house. [Edward Hungerford, "The Modern Railroad," 1911]
club-fist (n.) Look up club-fist at Dictionary.com
1570s, "a large fist," hence, "a brutal fellow," from club (n.) + fist (n.).
club-foot (n.) Look up club-foot at Dictionary.com
also clubfoot, "deformed foot," 1530s, from club (n.) + foot (n.).
club-house (n.) Look up club-house at Dictionary.com
also clubhouse, "place of meeting and refreshment always open to those who are members of the club," 1818, from club (n.) in the associative sense + house (n.). Clubhouse lawyer is baseball slang by 1940s.
clubbed (adj.) Look up clubbed at Dictionary.com
late 14c., "shaped like a club," from club (n.). Specifically of defects of the foot by c. 1500; meaning "formed into a club" is from 1620s.
clubby (adj.) Look up clubby at Dictionary.com
"of a social disposition," 1859, from club (n.) in the associative sense + -y (2). Related: Clubbily; clubbiness.
cluck (n.) Look up cluck at Dictionary.com
1703, "sound made by a hen," from cluck (v.). Slang meaning "stupid person" (turkeys are famously foolish) is from 1927.
cluck (v.) Look up cluck at Dictionary.com
Old English cloccian originally echoic. Compare Turkish culuk, one of the words for "turkey;" Greek klozein, Latin glocire, German glucken. Related: Clucked; clucking.
clue (v.) Look up clue at Dictionary.com
"to inform someone of the important facts," usually with in, 1934, from clue (n.). Related: Clued; cluing. Earlier in now-obsolete sense of "follow or track by clues" (1660s). In nautical use, "to haul up (a sail) by means of the clue-lines," from clue (n.) in the "wound ball of yarn" sense.
clue (n.) Look up clue at Dictionary.com
1590s, spelling variant of clew "a ball of thread or yarn," in this sense with reference to the one Theseus used as a guide out of the Labyrinth. The purely figurative sense of "that which points the way" is from 1620s. As something which a bewildered person does not have, by 1948.
clueless (adj.) Look up clueless at Dictionary.com
1862, "trackless," from clue (n.) + -less. Meaning "ignorant, uninformed" is from 1943, said to be RAF slang from 1930s. Student slang use by 1985 is perhaps an independent extension along the same line. Related: Cluelessly; cluelessness.
clump (v.2) Look up clump at Dictionary.com
"walk heavily," 1660s, imitative. Related: Clumped; clumping.
clump (v.1) Look up clump at Dictionary.com
"to heap or gather in clumps" (transitive), 1824, from clump (n.). Related: Clumped; clumping. Intransitive sense "to form a clump or clumps" is recorded from 1896.
clump (n.) Look up clump at Dictionary.com
1580s, "lump; cluster of trees," from Middle English clompe "a lump" (c. 1300), from Dutch klomp "lump, mass," or Middle Low German klumpe "clog, wooden shoe." Old English had clympre "lump, mass of metal."
clumperton (n.) Look up clumperton at Dictionary.com
"clown, clodhopper," 1530s, from clump (n.), probably on model of simpleton.
clumpy (adj.) Look up clumpy at Dictionary.com
1820, from clump (n.) + -y (2). Also noted 1881 in an Isle of Wight glossary as a noun meaning "a stupid fellow." Related: Clumpily; clumpiness. Compare also clumperton "clown, clodhopper" (1530s).
clumsy (adj.) Look up clumsy at Dictionary.com
1590s, "acting as if benumbed," alteration of Middle English clumsid "numb with cold" (14c.), past participle of clumsen "to benumb, stiffen or paralyze with cold or fear," from a Scandinavian source akin to Old Norse klumsa "make speechless, palsy; prevent from speaking," intensive of kluma "to make motionless." For insertion of -s-, see flimsy.

Not in general use until 18c., with senses "manifesting awkwardness; so made as to be unwieldy." Related: Clumsily; clumsiness. Compare Swedish dialectal klummsen "benumbed with cold," Norwegian klumsad (past participle) "speechless, palsied by a spasm or by fear or witchery;" German verklammen "grow stiff or numb with cold." Also compare clumse (n.) "a stupid fellow."
clung Look up clung at Dictionary.com
Old English clungen, past tense and past participle of cling.
clunk (v.) Look up clunk at Dictionary.com
1796, "to make the sound of a cork being pulled from a bottle;" imitative. This was the main sense through most of 19c. Meaning "to hit, strike" is attested from 1940s. Related: Clunked; clunking.
clunker (n.) Look up clunker at Dictionary.com
"anything inferior," 1940s, agent noun from clunk (v.), probably in imitation of the sounds made by old machinery. Specific sense of "old car" was in use by 1951 (clunk in the sense "old worn-out machine" is from 1940s).
clunky (adj.) Look up clunky at Dictionary.com
"blocky, ungraceful," by 1968 (when it was the name of a style of women's shoe), from clunk + -y (2). Related: Clunkily; clunkiness.
cluster (v.) Look up cluster at Dictionary.com
late 14c. (transitive), from cluster (n.). Intransitive sense from 1540s. Related: Clustered; clustering.
cluster (n.) Look up cluster at Dictionary.com
Old English clyster "cluster," probably from the same root as clot (n.). Of stars, from 1727. Cluster-bomb attested from 1967.
clusterfuck (n.) Look up clusterfuck at Dictionary.com
"bungled or confused undertaking," 1969, U.S. military slang, from cluster + fuck, probably in the "bungle" sense. Earlier the compound meant "orgy" (1966).
clutch (n.2) Look up clutch at Dictionary.com
movable mechanical part for transmitting motion, 1814, from clutch (v.), with the "seizing" sense extended to "device for bringing working parts together." Originally of mill-works, first used of motor vehicles 1899. Meaning "moment when heroics are required" is attested from 1920s.
clutch (v.) Look up clutch at Dictionary.com
Old English clyccan "bring together, bend (the fingers), clench," from PIE *klukja- (source also of Swedish klyka "clamp, fork;" related to cling). Meaning "to grasp" is early 14c.; that of "to seize with the claws or clutches" is from late 14c. Sense of "hold tightly and close" is from c. 1600. Influenced in meaning by Middle English cloke "a claw." Related: Clutched; clutching.
clutch (n.3) Look up clutch at Dictionary.com
"a brood, a nest" in reference to chickens, eggs, 1721, from clekken "to hatch" (c. 1400). Said by OED to be apparently a southern England dialect word. Compare batch/bake. Probably from a Scandinavian source (such as Old Norse klekja "to hatch"), perhaps of imitative origin (compare cluck (v.)).
clutch (n.1) Look up clutch at Dictionary.com
"a claw, grip, grasp," c. 1300, from cloche "claw," from cloke (c. 1200), related to clucchen, clicchen (see clutch (v.)). Meaning "grasping hand" (1520s) led to that of "tight grasp" (1784). Related: Clutches.
clutter (v.) Look up clutter at Dictionary.com
1550s, "to collect in heaps," variant of clotern "to form clots, to heap on" (c. 1400); related to clot (n.). Sense of "to litter" is first recorded 1660s. Related: Cluttered; cluttering.
clutter (n.) Look up clutter at Dictionary.com
1570s, "things lying in heaps or confusion," from clutter (v.); the "litter" sense is from 1660s.
Clyde Look up Clyde at Dictionary.com
masc. proper name, from the family name, from the region of the Clyde River in Scotland (see Clydesdale). Most popular in U.S. for boys c. 1890-1910, falling off rapidly thereafter, hence probably its use in 1940s teenager slang for "a square, one not versed in popular music or culture."
Clydesdale Look up Clydesdale at Dictionary.com
"breed of heavy draught horses," 1786, so called because they were bred in the valley of the Clyde in Scotland. The river name is perhaps literally "cleansing," from a Celtic root akin to Latin cloaca (see cloaca).
clyster (n.) Look up clyster at Dictionary.com
from French clystère (Old French clistre, 13c.) or directly from Latin clyster, from Greek klyster, from klyzein "to wash out" (see cloaca).
Clytaemnestra Look up Clytaemnestra at Dictionary.com
also Clytemnestra, wife and murderess of Agamemnon, from Greek Klytaimnestra, from klytos "celebrated, heard of" (see loud) + mnester "wooer, suitor," literally "willing to mind, mindful of," related to mnasthai "to remember," from PIE root *men- (1) "to think."
cn- Look up cn- at Dictionary.com
consonant group used in Old English (the Clark Hall dictionary has 82 entries under cn-) but in Middle English all lost or turned to kn-. Also common in Greek, and retained in the spelling of some English words from Greek but not now admitted in speech, the n- only being sounded.
Cnidaria (n.) Look up Cnidaria at Dictionary.com
phylum of stinging invertebrates, from Latinized form of Greek knide "nettle," from stem of knizein "to scratch scrape," + abstract noun ending -ia. Related: Cnidarian.
co- Look up co- at Dictionary.com
in Latin, the form of com- in compounds with stems beginning in vowels and h- and gn- (see com-). Taken in English from 17c. as a living prefix meaning "together, mutually, in common," and used promiscuously with native words and Latin-derived words not beginning with vowels, sometimes even with words already having it (such as co-conspiritor).