boardroom (n.) Look up boardroom at Dictionary.com
also board-room, 1731, from board (n.1) in the sense of "table where council is held" + room (n.).
boardwalk (n.) Look up boardwalk at Dictionary.com
"walkway made of boards," 1864, American English, from board (n.1) + walk (n.). As a seaside attraction from 1881, first in reference to Atlantic City, N.J.
boast (v.) Look up boast at Dictionary.com
early 14c., "to brag, speak arrogantly;" from the same source as boast (n.). Related: Boasted; boasting.
boast (n.) Look up boast at Dictionary.com
mid-13c., "arrogance, presumption, pride, vanity;" c. 1300, "a brag, boastful speech," from Anglo-French bost "ostentation," probably via Scandinavian (compare Norwegian baus "proud, bold, daring"), from Proto-Germanic *bausia "to blow up, puff up, swell" (source also of Middle High German bus "swelling," dialectal German baustern "to swell;" Middle Dutch bose, Dutch boos "evil, wicked, angry," Old High German bosi "worthless, slanderous," German böse "evil, bad, angry"), from PIE *bhou-, variant of root *beu-, *bheu- "to grow, swell" (see bull (n.2)).

The notion apparently is of being "puffed up" with pride; compare Old English belgan "to become angry, offend, provoke," belg "anger, arrogance," from the same root as bellows and belly (n.). Related: Boasted; boasting. An Old English word for "boasting" was micelsprecende, "big talk."
boastful (adj.) Look up boastful at Dictionary.com
early 14c., from boast (n.) + -ful. Related: Boastfully; boastfulness.
boat (n.) Look up boat at Dictionary.com
Old English bat "boat, ship, vessel," from Proto-Germanic *bait- (source also of Old Norse batr, Dutch boot, German Boot), possibly from PIE root *bheid- "to split," if the notion is of making a boat by hollowing out a tree trunk or from split planking; or it may be an extension of the name for some part of a ship. French bateau "boat" is from Old English or Norse. Spanish batel, Italian battello, Medieval Latin batellus likewise probably are from Germanic.
boatswain (n.) Look up boatswain at Dictionary.com
mid-15c., from late Old English batswegen, from bat "boat" (see boat (n.)) + Old Norse sveinn "boy" (see swain). Phonetic spelling bo'sun/bosun is attested from 1840.
BOATSWAIN. The warrant officer who in the old Navy was responsible for all the gear that set the ship in motion and all the tackle that kept her at rest. [Sir Geoffrey Callender, "Sea Passages," 1943]
bob (n.1) Look up bob at Dictionary.com
"act of bobbing," 1540s, from bob (v.1). As a slang word for "shilling" it is attested from 1789, but the signification is unknown.
bob (v.1) Look up bob at Dictionary.com
"move with a short, jerking motion," late 14c., probably connected to Middle English bobben "to strike, beat" (late 13c.), perhaps of echoic origin. Another early sense was "to make a fool of, cheat" (early 14c.). Related: Bobbed; bobbing. The sense in bobbing for apples (or cherries) recorded by 1799.
bob (n.2) Look up bob at Dictionary.com
"short hair," 1680s, attested 1570s in sense of "a horse's tail cut short," from earlier bobbe "cluster" (as of leaves), mid-14c., a northern word, perhaps of Celtic origin (compare Irish baban "tassel, cluster," Gaelic babag). Used over the years in various senses connected by the notion of "round, hanging mass," such as "weight at the end of a line" (1650s). The hair sense was revived with a shift in women's styles early 20c. (verb 1918, noun 1920). Related words include bobby pin, bobby sox, bobsled, bobcat.
bobbin (n.) Look up bobbin at Dictionary.com
1520s, from French bobine, small instrument used in sewing or tapestry-making, perhaps from Latin balbus (see babble (v.)) for the stuttering, stammering noise it made.
bobbinet (n.) Look up bobbinet at Dictionary.com
1819, from bobbin + net (n.).
bobble (v.) Look up bobble at Dictionary.com
1812, frequentative of bob (v.1). The notion is "to move or handle something with continual bobbing." Related: Bobbled; bobbling. Bobble-head as a type of doll is from 1968.
bobby (n.) Look up bobby at Dictionary.com
"London policeman," 1844, from Mr. (later Sir) Robert Peel (1788-1850), Home Secretary who introduced the Metropolitan Police Act (10 Geo IV, c.44) of 1829. Compare peeler.
bobby pin (n.) Look up bobby pin at Dictionary.com
1928, from diminutive of bob (n.2) + pin (n.).
bobby sox Look up bobby sox at Dictionary.com
1943, from diminutive of bob (n.2) + sox. So called because they are "shortened" compared to knee-socks. Derivative bobby-soxer first attested 1944.
Months ago colored bobby sox folded at the top were decreed, not by anyone or any group but, as usual, by a sudden mysterious and universal acceptance of the new idea. Now no teen-ager dares wear anything but pure white socks without a fold. ["Life" magazine, Dec. 11, 1944]
bobcat (n.) Look up bobcat at Dictionary.com
North American lynx, 1873, in a Maine context; so called for its short tail; see bob (n.2) + cat (n.).
bobolink (n.) Look up bobolink at Dictionary.com
American passerine bird, 1796, American English, earlier bob-lincoln, bob-o-Lincoln (1774), imitative of the hearty song of the bird.
bobsled (n.) Look up bobsled at Dictionary.com
1839, from bob (n.2) + sled (n.). So called because it is a short type.
bobwhite (n.) Look up bobwhite at Dictionary.com
North American partridge, 1819, so called from the sound of its cry.
Boccaccio Look up Boccaccio at Dictionary.com
the name means "big-mouth" in Italian, from boccaccia, augmentative of bocca "mouth" (see bouche).
bocce (n.) Look up bocce at Dictionary.com
from Italian bocce "(wooden) balls," plural of boccia, which is related to French bosse "bump, hump," perhaps from a Germanic source.
Boche (n.) Look up Boche at Dictionary.com
"German soldier in World War I," 1914, perhaps from French slang boche "rascal," applied to the Germans; a word of unknown origin. Another theory traces it to French Allemand "German," in eastern French Al(le)moche, altered contemptuously to Alboche by association with caboche, a slang word for "head," literally "cabbage" (compare tete de boche, French for "German" in an 1887 slang dictionary). All the French terms are no older than mid-19c.
bock (n.) Look up bock at Dictionary.com
strong, dark type of German beer, 1856, from German ambock, from Bavarian dialectal pronunciation of Einbecker bier, from Einbeck, Hanover, where it was first brewed; popularly associated with Bock "a goat." Brewed in December and January, drunk in May.
bod (n.) Look up bod at Dictionary.com
1788, "a person," short for body. Meaning "physical body" is recorded from 1933.
bodacious (adj.) Look up bodacious at Dictionary.com
1837 (implied in bodaciously), Southern U.S. slang, perhaps from bodyaciously "bodily, totally," or a blend of bold and audacious, which suits the earliest attested sense of the word. Popularized anew by 1982 Hollywood film "An Officer and a Gentleman."
bode (v.) Look up bode at Dictionary.com
Old English bodian "proclaim, announce; foretell," from boda "messenger," probably from Proto-Germanic *budon- (source also of Old Saxon gibod, German gebot, Old Norse boð), from PIE root *bheudh- "be aware, make aware." As a shortened form of forebode (usually evil), it dates from 1740. Related: Boded; boding.
bodega (n.) Look up bodega at Dictionary.com
1848, from Mexican Spanish, from Spanish bodega "a wine shop; cellar," from Latin apotheca, from Greek apotheke "depot, store" (see apothecary). Also a doublet of boutique.
Bodhisattva (n.) Look up Bodhisattva at Dictionary.com
1828, from Sanskrit, literally "one whose essence is perfect knowledge," from bodhi "perfect knowledge" (see Buddha) + sattva "reality, being," from sat-, sant- "existing, true, virtuous," from PIE root *es- "to be."
bodice (n.) Look up bodice at Dictionary.com
1560s, oddly spelled plural of body, name of a tight-fitting Elizabethan garment covering the torso; plural because the body came in two parts which fastened in the middle. Bodice-ripper for "racy romance novel" is from 1981.
bodily (adj.) Look up bodily at Dictionary.com
c. 1300, "pertaining to the body;" also opposed to "spiritual;" from body + -ly (1). As an adverb (with -ly (2)) from late 14c.
bodkin (n.) Look up bodkin at Dictionary.com
late 14c., boydekin, of unknown origin. The ending suggests a diminutive formation, and Celtic has been suggested as the source of the root.
Bodleian Look up Bodleian at Dictionary.com
from Sir Thomas Bodley (1545-1613), who in 1597 refounded the library at Oxford University.
Bodoni Look up Bodoni at Dictionary.com
1880, typeface based on that used by celebrated Italian printer Giambattista Bodoni (1740-1813) of Parma. The modern type of this name is a composite of his many forms.
body (n.) Look up body at Dictionary.com
Old English bodig "trunk, chest" (of a man or animal); related to Old High German botah, of unknown origin. Not elsewhere in Germanic, and the word has died out in German (replaced by leib, originally "life," and körper, from Latin). In English, extension to "person" is from late 13c. Meaning "main part" of anything was in late Old English, hence its use in reference to vehicles (1520s).

Contrasted with soul since at least mid-13c. Meaning "corpse" (short for dead body) is from late 13c. Transferred to matter generally in Middle English (as in heavenly body, late 14c.). Body politic "the nation, the state" first recorded 1520s, legalese, with French word order. Body image was coined 1935. Body language is attested from 1967, perhaps from French langage corporel (1966). Phrase over my dead body attested by 1833.
bodyguard (n.) Look up bodyguard at Dictionary.com
1735, "retinue, escort," collective singular, from body + guard (n.). Attested 1861 as "a soldier of the bodyguard."
Boeing Look up Boeing at Dictionary.com
U.S. aerospace corporation, founded 1916 by William E. Boeing in Seattle, Washington, as an airplane manufacturer. The family name is German.
Boeotian (adj.) Look up Boeotian at Dictionary.com
1590s, "ignorant, dull," from Boeotia, district around Thebes in ancient Greece (said to have been so called for its cattle pastures; from Greek bous "ox," from PIE root *gwou- "ox, bull, cow"), whose inhabitants were characterized as proverbially dull and countrified by their neighbors, the Athenians. The Boeotians presumably held reciprocal opinions, but their great writers, Plutarch and Pindar, though patriots, are full of praise for Athenian deeds and institutions.
Though his aim was to vindicate Boeotia, [Pindar] has probably done her a disservice, in that he has helped to immortalise the scurrilous proverb Βοιωτία ύς, which he wished to confute. ... If left to itself, the slander might have passed into oblivion long ago. [W. Rhys Roberts, "The Ancient Boeotians," 1895]
Boer (n.) Look up Boer at Dictionary.com
"Dutch colonist in South Africa," 1824, from Dutch boer "farmer," from Middle Dutch, cognate with Old English gebur "dweller, farmer, peasant," and thus related to bower, German Bauer, and the final syllable of neighbor, from PIE root *bheue- "to be, exist, grow." Boer War (1899-1902) was technically the Second Boer War, there having been a brief preview 1880-1881.
boffin (n.) Look up boffin at Dictionary.com
"person engaged in innovative research," especially in aviation, 1945; earlier "elderly naval officer" (1941), probably from one of the "Mr. Boffins" of English literature (as in "Our Mutual Friend").
boffo (adj.) Look up boffo at Dictionary.com
strikingly successful, by 1961, show biz slang, probably echoic of a "hit."
bog (v.) Look up bog at Dictionary.com
"to sink (something or someone) in a bog," c. 1600, from bog (n.). Intransitive use from c. 1800. Related: Bogged; bogging.
bog (n.) Look up bog at Dictionary.com
c. 1500, from Gaelic and Irish bogach "bog," from adjective bog "soft, moist," from Proto-Celtic *buggo- "flexible," from PIE root *bheugh- "to bend." Bog-trotter applied to the wild Irish from 1670s.
bogart (v.) Look up bogart at Dictionary.com
1969, "to keep a joint in your mouth," dangling from the lip like Humphrey Bogart's cigarette in the old movies, instead of passing it on. First attested in "Easy Rider." The word was also used 1960s with notions of "get something by intimidation, be a tough guy" (again with reference to the actor and the characters he typically played). In old drinking slang, Captain Cork was "a man slow in passing the bottle."
bogey (n.1) Look up bogey at Dictionary.com
World War II aviator slang for "unidentified aircraft, presumably hostile," probably ultimately from bogge, a variant of Middle English bugge "a frightening specter" (see bug (n.)). Thus it shares ancestry with many dialect words, such as bog/bogge (attested 16c.-17c.), bogeyman (16c.), boggart "specter that haunts a gloomy spot" (c. 1570, in Westmoreland, Lancashire, Cheshire, and Yorkshire). The earliest modern form appears to be Scottish bogle "ghost," attested from c. 1500 and popularized c. 1800 in English literature by Scott, Burns, etc.
bogey (n.2) Look up bogey at Dictionary.com
in golfing, c. 1891, originally "number of strokes a good player is supposed to need for a given hole or course;" later, "score one over par" (1946); from the same source as bogey (n.1), on the notion of a "phantom" opponent, represented by the "ground score." The word was in vogue at the time in Britain because of the popularity of a music hall tune "Hush, Hush, Hush, Here Comes the Bogey Man."
One popular song at least has left its permanent effect on the game of golf. That song is 'The Bogey Man.' In 1890 Dr. Thos. Browne, R.N., the hon. secretary of the Great Yarmouth Club, was playing against a Major Wellman, the match being against the 'ground score,' which was the name given to the scratch value of each hole. The system of playing against the 'ground score' was new to Major Wellman, and he exclaimed, thinking of the song of the moment, that his mysterious and well-nigh invincible opponent was a regular 'bogey-man.' The name 'caught on' at Great Yarmouth, and to-day 'Bogey' is one of the most feared opponents on all the courses that acknowledge him. [1908, cited in OED]
Other early golfing sources give it an American origin. As a verb, attested by 1948.
bogeyman (n.) Look up bogeyman at Dictionary.com
16c.; see bogey (n.1) + man (n.).
boggle (v.) Look up boggle at Dictionary.com
1590s, "to start with fright (as a startled horse does), shy, take alarm," from Middle English bugge "specter" (among other things, supposed to scare horses at night); see bug (n.); also compare bogey (n.1). The meaning "to raise scruples, hesitate" is from 1630s. As a noun from 1650s. Related: Boggled; boggling; boggler (from c. 1600 as "one who hesitates").
boggy (adj.) Look up boggy at Dictionary.com
1580s, from bog (n.) + -y (2). Related: Bogginess.
bogus Look up bogus at Dictionary.com
1838, "counterfeit money, spurious coin," American English, apparently from a slang word applied (according to some sources first in Ohio in 1827) to a counterfeiter's apparatus.
One bogus or machine impressing dies on the coin, with a number of dies, engraving tools, bank bill paper, spurious coin, &c. &c. making in all a large wagon load, was taken into possession by the attorney general of Lower Canada. [Niles' Register, Sept. 7, 1833, quoting from Concord, New Hampshire, "Statesman," Aug. 24]
Some trace this to tantrabobus, also tantrabogus, a late 18c. colloquial Vermont word for any odd-looking object, in later 19c. use "the devil," which might be connected to tantarabobs, recorded as a Devonshire name for the devil. Others trace it to the same source as bogey (n.1).