automatization (n.) Look up automatization at Dictionary.com
1924, noun of action from automatize.
automatize (v.) Look up automatize at Dictionary.com
1837, "to make into an automaton;" see automaton + -ize. Meaning "to make automatic" attested by 1952. Related: Automatized; automatizing.
automaton (n.) Look up automaton at Dictionary.com
1610s, from Latin automaton (Suetonius), from Greek automaton, neuter of automatos "self-acting," from autos "self" (see auto-) + matos "thinking, animated, willing," from PIE *mn-to-, from root *men- "to think" (see mind (n.)).
automobile (adj.) Look up automobile at Dictionary.com
1883, in reference to electric traction cars, from French automobile (adj.), 1861, a hybrid from Greek autos "self" (see auto-) + French mobile "moving," from Latin mobilis "movable" (see mobile (adj.)).
automobile (n.) Look up automobile at Dictionary.com
"self-propelled motor vehicle," 1895, from French automobile, short for véhicule automobile (see automobile (adj.)). The modern Greek calls it autokineto "moved of itself." The French word had competition in the early years from locomobile; in English other early forms were motorcar and autocar. An electrical car was an electromobile (1899).
automotive (adj.) Look up automotive at Dictionary.com
1865, in reference to some sort of helicopter-like device, a hybrid from auto- "self," from Greek, + motive (adj.), from Latin. Meaning "pertaining to automobiles" is from 1898.
autonomic (adj.) Look up autonomic at Dictionary.com
1832, "pertaining to autonomy" (q.v.); used mostly in physiology. Autonomical is recorded from 1650s.
autonomous (adj.) Look up autonomous at Dictionary.com
1800, from Greek autonomos "having one's own laws," of animals, "feeding or ranging at will," from autos "self" (see auto-) + nomos "law" (see numismatics). Compare privilege. Used mostly in metaphysics and politics; see autonomic.
autonomy (n.) Look up autonomy at Dictionary.com
1620s, of states, from Greek autonomia "independence," noun of quality from autonomos "independent, living by one's own laws," from auto- "self" (see auto-) + nomos "custom, law" (see numismatics). Of persons, from 1803.
autophobia (n.) Look up autophobia at Dictionary.com
"fear of referring to oneself," 1845 (as autophoby), from Greek autos "self" (see auto-) + -phobia "fear." Related: Autophobic; autophobe.
autopilot (n.) Look up autopilot at Dictionary.com
1935, from auto- + pilot (n.).
autopsy (n.) Look up autopsy at Dictionary.com
1650s, "an eye-witnessing," from Modern Latin autopsia, from Greek autopsia "a seeing with one's own eyes," from autos- "self" (see auto-) + opsis "a sight" (see eye (n.)). Sense of "dissection of a body to determine cause of death" is first recorded 1670s, probably from the same sense in French autopsie (1570s).
autosome (n.) Look up autosome at Dictionary.com
coined 1906 by U.S. cytologist T.H. Montgomery (1873-1912), from auto- + -some (3)). Related: Autosomal.
autosuggestion (n.) Look up autosuggestion at Dictionary.com
also auto-suggestion, 1879, a hybrid from auto- + suggestion. The idea, and probably the model for the word, originally from French.
autotheism (n.) Look up autotheism at Dictionary.com
"self-deification," 1610s, from auto- + theism. The religion of one who mistakes his own inner voices for God's voice in him. Also used in a theological sense (1580s) for "the regarding of the second person of the Trinity as God entire." Related: Autotheist.
autumn (n.) Look up autumn at Dictionary.com
late 14c., autumpne (modern form from 16c.), from Old French autumpne, automne (13c.), from Latin autumnus (also auctumnus, perhaps influenced by auctus "increase"), which is of unknown origin. Perhaps from Etruscan, but Tucker suggests a meaning "drying-up season" and a root in *auq- (which would suggest the form in -c- was the original) and compares archaic English sere-month "August."

Harvest was the English name for the season until autumn began to displace it 16c. In Britain, the season is popularly August through October; in U.S., September through November. Compare Italian autunno, Spanish otoño, Portuguese outono, all from the Latin word. Unlike the other three seasons, its names across the Indo-European languages leave no evidence that there ever was a common word for it.

Many "autumn" words mean "end, end of summer," or "harvest." Compare also Lithuanian ruduo "autumn," from rudas "reddish," in reference to leaves; Old Irish fogamar, literally "under-winter."
autumnal (adj.) Look up autumnal at Dictionary.com
1570s, from Latin autumnalis "pertaining to autumn," from autumnus (see autumn).
auxiliary (adj.) Look up auxiliary at Dictionary.com
c. 1600, from Latin auxiliaris "helpful," from auxilium "aid, help, support," related to auctus, past participle of augere "to increase" (see augment).
auxiliary (n.) Look up auxiliary at Dictionary.com
"foreign troops in service of a nation at war," c. 1600, from auxiliary (adj.). Related: Auxiliaries.
auxin (n.) Look up auxin at Dictionary.com
plant growth hormone, 1934, from German (1931), from Greek auxein "to increase" (see augment) + chemical suffix -in (2).
avail (v.) Look up avail at Dictionary.com
c. 1300, availen, apparently a French compound formed in English from Old French a- "to" (see ad-) + vailen "to avail," from vaill-, present stem of valoir "be worth," from Latin valere (see valiant). Related: Availed; availing. As a noun, from c. 1400.
availability (n.) Look up availability at Dictionary.com
1803, from available + -ity.
available (adj.) Look up available at Dictionary.com
mid-15c., "beneficial," also "valid, effective, capable of producing the desired effect," from avail + -able. Meaning "at one's disposal, capable of being made use of" is recorded from 1827.
availing (adj.) Look up availing at Dictionary.com
"advantageous," early 15c., present participle adjective from avail (v.).
availment (n.) Look up availment at Dictionary.com
1690s, from avail (v.) + -ment.
avalanche (n.) Look up avalanche at Dictionary.com
1763, from French avalanche (17c.), from Romansch (Swiss) avalantze "descent," altered (by metathesis of -l- and -v-, probably influenced by Old French avaler "to descend, go down") from Savoy dialect lavantse, from Provençal lavanca "avalanche," perhaps from a pre-Latin Alpine language (the suffix -anca suggests Ligurian). As a verb, from 1872.
avant Look up avant at Dictionary.com
French, literally "before," in various terms borrowed into English, corresponding to Italian avanti, both from Latin abante, a compound of ab "from" (see ab-) and ante "before, in front of" (see ante), which first meant "from in front of," but in Vulgar Latin came to mean simply "before."
avant-garde (n.) Look up avant-garde at Dictionary.com
(also avant garde, avantgarde); French, literally "advance guard" (see avant + guard (n.)). Used in English 15c.-18c. in a literal, military sense; borrowed again 1910 as an artistic term for "pioneers or innovators of a particular period." Also used around the same time in communist and anarchist publications. As an adjective, by 1925.
The avant-garde générale, avant-garde stratégique, or avant-garde d'armée is a strong force (one, two, or three army corps) pushed out a day's march to the front, immediately behind the cavalry screen. Its mission is, vigorously to engage the enemy wherever he is found, and, by binding him, to ensure liberty of action in time and space for the main army. ["Sadowa," Gen. Henri Bonnal, transl. C.F. Atkinson, 1907]
avarice (n.) Look up avarice at Dictionary.com
c. 1300, from Old French avarice "greed, covetousness" (12c.), from Latin avaritia "greed," from avarus "greedy," adjectival form of avere "crave, long for."
avaricious (adj.) Look up avaricious at Dictionary.com
late 15c., from Old French avaricios "greedy, covetous" (Modern French avaricieux), from avarice (see avarice). An Old English word for it was feoh-georn. Related: Avariciously; avariciousness.
avast Look up avast at Dictionary.com
1680s, a nautical interjection, "hold! stop!" probably worn down from Dutch houd vast "hold fast."
AVAST. -- The order to stop, or pause, in any exercise or operation; as Avast heaving -- that is to say, desist, or stop, from drawing in the cable or hawser, by means of the capstan &c. [George Biddlecombe, "The Art of Rigging," 1848]
avatar (n.) Look up avatar at Dictionary.com
1784, "descent of a Hindu deity," from Sanskrit avatarana "descent" (of a deity to the earth in incarnate form), from ava- "off, down" (from PIE *au- (2) "off, away") + base of tarati "(he) crosses over," from PIE root *tere- (2) "to cross over" (see through). In computer use, it seems to trace to the novel "Snowcrash" (1992) by Neal Stephenson.
avaunt Look up avaunt at Dictionary.com
interjection, late 15c., "begone," literally "move on," from Middle French avant "forward!" (see avant).
ave Look up ave at Dictionary.com
"hail," also "farewell," early 13c. (in reference to the Ave Maria), from Latin ave, second person singular imperative of avere "to be or fare well."
Ave Maria Look up Ave Maria at Dictionary.com
modified form of the angelic salutation to the Virgin (Luke i:28) used as a devotional recitation, early 13c., from the opening words ("Ave [Maria] gratia plena").
avenge (v.) Look up avenge at Dictionary.com
late 14c., from Anglo-French avenger, Old French avengier, from a- "to" (see ad-) + vengier "take revenge" (Modern French venger), from Latin vindicare "to claim, avenge, punish" (see vindicate). Related: Avenged; avenging.
avenger (n.) Look up avenger at Dictionary.com
1530s, agent noun from avenge (v.). Spenser (1596) has avengeress but no mention of Mrs. Peel.
avenue (n.) Look up avenue at Dictionary.com
c. 1600, "a way of approach" (originally a military word), from Middle French avenue "way of access," from Old French avenue "act of approaching, arrival," noun use of fem. of avenu, past participle of avenir "to come to, arrive," from Latin advenire "to come to," from ad- "to" (see ad-) + venire "to come" (see venue). Meaning shifted to "a way of approach to a country-house," usually bordered by trees, hence, "a broad, tree-lined roadway" (1650s), then to "wide, main street" (by 1846, especially in U.S.).
aver (v.) Look up aver at Dictionary.com
late 14c., from Old French averer "verify," from Vulgar Latin *adverare "make true, prove to be true," from Latin ad- "to" (see ad-) + verus "true" (see very). Related: Averred; averring.
average (adj.) Look up average at Dictionary.com
1770; see average (n.).
average (v.) Look up average at Dictionary.com
1769, from average (n.). Related: Averaged; averaging.
average (n.) Look up average at Dictionary.com
late 15c., "financial loss incurred through damage to goods in transit," from French avarie "damage to ship," and Italian avaria; a word from 12c. Mediterranean maritime trade (compare Spanish averia; other Germanic forms, Dutch avarij, German haferei, etc., also are from Romanic languages), which is of uncertain origin. Sometimes traced to Arabic 'arwariya "damaged merchandise." Meaning shifted to "equal sharing of such loss by the interested parties." Transferred sense of "statement of a medial estimate" is first recorded 1735. The mathematical extension is from 1755.
Averroes Look up Averroes at Dictionary.com
Latinization of name of Ibn Rushd (1126-1198) Arab philosopher and physician of Spain and Morocco.
averse (adj.) Look up averse at Dictionary.com
mid-15c., "turned away in mind or feeling," from Old French avers and directly from Latin aversus "turned away, turned back," past participle of avertere (see avert). Originally and usually in English in the mental sense, while avert is used in a physical sense.
Averse applies to feeling, adverse to action: as, I was very averse to his going: an adverse vote: adverse fortune. [Century Dictionary, 1906]
aversion (n.) Look up aversion at Dictionary.com
"a turning away from," 1590s; figurative sense of "mental attitude of repugnance" is from 1650s, from Middle French aversion and directly from Latin aversionem (nominative aversio), noun of action from past participle stem of aversus "turned away, backwards, behind, hostile," itself past participle of avertere (see avert). Earlier in the literal sense of "a turning away from" (1590s). Aversion therapy in psychology is from 1950.
avert (v.) Look up avert at Dictionary.com
c. 1400, from Old French avertir (12c.), "turn, direct; avert; make aware," from Vulgar Latin *advertire, from Latin avertere "to turn away, to drive away," from ab- "from, away" (see ab-) + vertere "to turn" (see versus). Related: Averted; averting.
Avestan Look up Avestan at Dictionary.com
Eastern Iranian language that survived in sacred texts centuries after it went extinct, from Persian Avesta "sacred books of the Parsees," earlier Avistak, literally "books."
avian (adj.) Look up avian at Dictionary.com
"pertaining to birds," 1870, from Latin avis "bird" (see aviary) + -an.
aviary (n.) Look up aviary at Dictionary.com
1570s, from Latin aviarium "place in which birds are kept," neuter of aviarius "of birds," from avis "bird," from PIE *awi- "bird" (cognates: Sanskrit vih, Avestan vish "bird," Greek aietos "eagle").
aviation (n.) Look up aviation at Dictionary.com
1866, from French aviation, noun of action from stem of Latin avis "bird" (see aviary). Coined 1863 by French aviation pioneer Guillaume Joseph Gabriel de La Landelle (1812-1886) in "Aviation ou Navigation aérienne."