androphobia (n.) Look up androphobia at
"morbid fear of the male sex" (sometimes, rather, "of the human race" or "of crowds), 1844, from andro- + -phobia. Related: Androphobic.
Andy Look up Andy at
familiar shortening of masc. proper name Andrew (q.v.).
anear (adv.) Look up anear at
"nearly," c. 1600, from a- (1) + near.
anecdotage (n.) Look up anecdotage at
"anecdotes collectively," 1823, from anecdote + -age. As a jocular coinage meaning "garrulous old age" it is recorded from 1835, and led to anecdotard.
anecdotal (adj.) Look up anecdotal at
1794, from anecdote + -al (1). Related: Anecdotally. Anecdotical is attested from 1744.
anecdote (n.) Look up anecdote at
1670s, "secret or private stories," from French anecdote (17c.) or directly from Greek anekdota "things unpublished," neuter plural of anekdotos, from an- "not" (see an-) + ekdotos "published," from ek- "out" + didonai "to give" (see date (n.1)).

Procopius' 6c. Anecdota, unpublished memoirs of Emperor Justinian full of court gossip, gave the word a sense of "revelation of secrets," which decayed in English to "brief, amusing stories" (1761).
anechoic (adj.) Look up anechoic at
1948, in electronics, from an- (1) "not" + echoic.
anemia (n.) Look up anemia at
alternative (chiefly U.S.) spelling of anaemia (q.v.). See ae. As a genus of plants, Modern Latin, from Greek aneimon "unclad," from privative prefix an- (see an- (1)) + eima "a dress, garment" (see wear (v.)).
anemic (adj.) Look up anemic at
alternative (chiefly U.S.) spelling of anaemic (q.v.). See ae.
anemo- Look up anemo- at
before vowels anem-, word-forming element meaning "wind," from comb. form of Greek anemos (see anemone).
anemometer (n.) Look up anemometer at
1727, from anemo- "wind" + -meter.
anemone (n.) Look up anemone at
flowering plant genus, 1550s, from Middle French anemone (16c.) and directly from Latin anemone, from Greek anemone "wind flower," literally "daughter of the wind," from anemos "wind" (cognate with Latin anima; see animus) + -one feminine patronymic suffix. According to Asa Gray, so called because it was thought to open only when the wind blows. Klein suggests the flower name perhaps originally is from Hebrew (compare na'aman, in nit'e na'amanim, literally "plants of pleasantness," in Is. xvii:10, from na'em "was pleasant"). Applied to a type of sea creature (sea anemone) from 1773.
anencephalic (adj.) Look up anencephalic at
"having no brain" (biology), 1839, from Greek anenkephalos, from privative prefix an- (see an- (1)) + enkephalos "brain" (see encephalitis) + -ic.
anent (prep.) Look up anent at
"concerning, about," early 13c., onont "on level with," also "in the company of, fronting against," from Old English on efn "near to, close by," originally "on even (ground) with;" the parasitic -t added 12c. A northern form (in Midlands, anenst, with adverbial genitive), affected by English writers in Scottish sense of "in respect or reference to." Compare German neben "near to, by the side of," short for in eben, from Old High German ebani "equality."
anesthesia (n.) Look up anesthesia at
alternative spelling of anaesthesia (q.v.). See ae.
anesthesiologist (n.) Look up anesthesiologist at
alternative spelling of anaesthesiologist (q.v.). See ae.
anesthesiology (n.) Look up anesthesiology at
alternative spelling of anaesthesiology (q.v.). See ae.
anesthetic (adj.) Look up anesthetic at
alternative spelling of anaesthetic (q.v.). See ae.
anesthetist (n.) Look up anesthetist at
alternative spelling of anaesthetist (q.v.). See ae.
anesthetize (v.) Look up anesthetize at
alternative spelling of anaesthetize (q.v.). See ae.
aneuploidy (n.) Look up aneuploidy at
abnormal number of chromosomes, 1934, from aneuploid (1931), Modern Latin, coined 1922 by G. Täckholm from an- (1) "not" + euploid, from Greek eu- "well, good" (see eu-) + -ploid, from ploos "fold" (see -plus) + -oid.
aneurism (n.) Look up aneurism at
the less correct, but more popular, spelling of aneurysm (q.v.), by influence of words in -ism. The -y- is etymologically correct; the spelling with -i- suggests a meaning "nervelessness."
aneurysm (n.) Look up aneurysm at
early 15c., from Medieval Latin aneurisma, from Greek aneurysmos "dilation," from aneurynein "to dilate," from ana- "up" (see ana-) + eurynein "widen," from eurys "broad, wide" (see eury-).
anew (adv.) Look up anew at
c. 1300, a neue, from Old English of-niowe; see a- (1) + new. One-word form dominant from c. 1400.
anext (adv.) Look up anext at
"next to," c. 1400, from a- (1) + next.
anfractuous (adj.) Look up anfractuous at
"full of windings and turnings," 1620s, from Latin anfractuous, from anfractus "a winding, a turning, bending round," especially "a circuitous route," from am(bi)- "around" (see ambi-) + fractus, past participle of frangere "to break" (see fraction). Related: Anfractuosity.
angel (n.) Look up angel at
14c. fusion of Old English engel (with hard -g-) and Old French angele, both from Latin angelus, from Greek angelos "messenger, envoy, one that announces," possibly related to angaros "mounted courier," both from an unknown Oriental word (Watkins compares Sanskrit ajira- "swift;" Klein suggests Semitic sources). Used in Scriptural translations for Hebrew mal'akh (yehowah) "messenger (of Jehovah)," from base l-'-k "to send." An Old English word for it was aerendgast, literally "errand-spirit."

Of persons, "loving; lovely," by 1590s. The medieval gold coin (a new issue of the noble, first struck 1465 by Edward VI) was so called for the image of archangel Michael slaying the dragon, which was stamped on it. It was the coin given to patients who had been "touched" for the King's Evil. Angel food cake is from 1881; angel dust "phencyclidine" is from 1968.
Angela Look up Angela at
fem. proper name, Latin fem. of angelus "angel" (see angel).
Angeleno (n.) Look up Angeleno at
"resident or native of Los Angeles," 1888, from American Spanish Angeleño, from (Los) Angeles + -eño, suffix indicating a native or resident. See Los Angeles.
angelfish (n.) Look up angelfish at
also angel-fish, 1660s, from angel + fish (n.); so called for its "wings."
angelic (adj.) Look up angelic at
late 15c., "pertaining to angels," from Old French angelique "angelic" (Modern French angélique (13c.), from Latin angelicus, from Greek angelikos "angelic," from angelos (see angel). Meaning "angel-like" is from late 14c.; sense of "wonderfully pure, sweet" is recorded from early 16c. Related: Angelically.
Angelica Look up Angelica at
fem. proper name, Latin fem. of angelicus "angelic" (see angel).
Angelina Look up Angelina at
fem. proper name, diminutive of Angela.
angelolatry (n.) Look up angelolatry at
"worship of angels," 1847, from angel + -latry.
anger (v.) Look up anger at
c. 1200, "to irritate, annoy, provoke," from Old Norse angra "to grieve, vex, distress; to be vexed at, take offense with," from Proto-Germanic *angus (cognates: Old English enge "narrow, painful," Middle Dutch enghe, Gothic aggwus "narrow"), from PIE root *angh- "tight, painfully constricted, painful" (cognates: Sanskrit amhu- "narrow," amhah "anguish;" Armenian anjuk "narrow;" Lithuanian ankstas "narrow;" Greek ankhein "to squeeze," ankhone "a strangling;" Latin angere "to throttle, torment;" Old Irish cum-ang "straitness, want"). In Middle English, also of physical pain. Meaning "excite to wrath, make angry" is from late 14c. Related: Angered; angering.
anger (n.) Look up anger at
mid-13c., "distress, suffering; anguish, agony," also "hostile attitude, ill will, surliness," from Old Norse angr "distress, grief. sorrow, affliction," from the same root as anger (v.). Sense of "rage, wrath" is early 14c. Old Norse also had angr-gapi "rash, foolish person;" angr-lauss "free from care;" angr-lyndi "sadness, low spirits."
Angevin Look up Angevin at
1650s, "pertaining to the French province of Anjou," from French Angevin, from Medieval Latin Andegavinus, from Andegavum "Angers," city in France, capital of Anjou (Latin Andegavia, from Andecavi, Roman name of the Gaulish people who lived here, which is of unknown origin). In English history, of the Plantagenet kings (beginning with Henry II) who were descended from Geoffrey, count of Anjou, and Matilda, daughter of Henry I.
angina (n.) Look up angina at
1570s, from Latin angina "infection of the throat," from Greek ankhone "a strangling" (see anger); probably influenced in Latin by angere "to throttle." Angina pectoris is from 1744, from Latin pectoris, genitive of pectus "chest" (see pectoral (adj.)).
angio- Look up angio- at
before verbs angi-, word-forming element now usually meaning "covered or enclosed by a seed or blood vessel," from Latinized form of Greek angeion "a vessel, receptacle," diminutive of angos "chest, box," which is of unknown origin.
angiogenesis (n.) Look up angiogenesis at
1896, from angio- + -genesis "birth, origin, creation."
angiogram (n.) Look up angiogram at
1933, from angio- + -gram.
angiography (n.) Look up angiography at
1731, from angio- + -graphy.
angioma (n.) Look up angioma at
1867, medical Latin, from angio- + -oma.
angioplasty (n.) Look up angioplasty at
by 1976, from angio- + -plasty.
angiosperm (n.) Look up angiosperm at
"plant with seeds contained in a protective vessel" (as distinguished from a gymnosperm), 1853, from Modern Latin Angiospermae, coined 1690 by German botanist Paul Hermann (1646-1695), from Greek angeion "vessel" (see angio-) + spermos, adjective from sperma "seed" (see sperm). So called because the seeds in this class of plants are enclosed.
angle (v.1) Look up angle at
"to fish with a hook," mid-15c., from Old English angel (n.) "angle, hook, fishhook," related to anga "hook," from PIE *ang-/*ank- "to bend" (see angle (n.)). Compare Old English angul, Old Norse öngull, Old High German angul, German Angel "fishhook." Figurative sense is recorded from 1580s.
It is but a sory lyfe and an yuell to stand anglynge all day to catche a fewe fisshes. [John Palsgrave, 1530]
Related: Angled; angling.
angle (n.) Look up angle at
"space between intersecting lines," late 14c., from Old French angle "angle, corner," and directly from Latin angulus "an angle, corner," a diminutive form from PIE root *ang-/*ank- "to bend" (cognates: Greek ankylos "bent, crooked," Latin ang(u)ere "to compress in a bend, fold, strangle;" Old Church Slavonic aglu "corner;" Lithuanian anka "loop;" Sanskrit ankah "hook, bent," angam "limb;" Old English ancleo "ankle;" Old High German ango "hook"). Angle bracket is 1875 in carpentry; 1956 in typography.
Angle Look up Angle at
member of a Teutonic tribe, Old English, from Latin Angli "the Angles," literally "people of Angul" (Old Norse Öngull), a region in what is now Holstein, said to be so-called for its hook-like shape (see angle (n.)). People from the tribe there founded the kingdoms of Mercia, Northumbia, and East Anglia in 5c. Britain. Their name, rather than that of the Saxons or Jutes, may have become the common one for the whole group of Germanic tribes because their dialect was the first committed to writing.
angle (v.2) Look up angle at
"to move at an angle, to move diagonally or obliquely," 1741, from angle (n.). Related: Angled; angling.
angler (n.) Look up angler at
"fisher with a hook and line," mid-15c. (c. 1300 as a surname); agent noun from angle (v.1).